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The short answer is "no". The long answer is "yes but . . ." You've re-partitioned the drive with a different type of data structure (ext4) that Windows can't recognize, so the original partition table that tells an operating system what is data and where it is is gone, and some of the data has been overwritten by the new version of Ubuntu you've installed. ...


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Probably the most powerful recovery software for most tasks is Testdisk which is free and open source and can be found in Ubuntu's software catalog, but can also be run from Windows or Mac as well. Its interface is relatively complex but its recovery is top-notch - in case of accidental formatting or destroying of a partition you probably want to use one of ...


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As long as you didn't completely shred your drive, if it was formatted fastly (it means, it just deletes the information, but it is still available in the hidden). It is possible, but requires amounts of time and a place to recover the files to (You should not recover to the same harddrive as they are located on) I found this by searching, may wanna give it ...


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Apparently it is not possible to recover the old ext4 filesystem. I am currently recovering some files with Photorec, with mixed success. A response from the developing of UFS Explorer is as follow: The reason is ext4 on time of format destroys completely all inodes and even file system journal so volume only contains file data; usually it is ...


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Ubuntu does not mount your real hard disk but you should be able to copy your data to an external hard easily enough. First Boot from the USB and select try Ubuntu I'm using the 12.04 CD to do this Now press Ctrl+Alt+T to open a termininal In the terminal enter the following command sudo -i Then nautilus This opens nautilus (the file manager) as ...


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Your disk uses the Master Boot Record (MBR) partitioning system, which is still probably the most common type on hard disks. Note that the partitioning system is entirely distinct from the filesystem, which is what's important in accessing the files on the disk. Try typing the following command: sudo blkid /dev/sdb? (Change /dev/sdb to whatever the disk ...


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You can "reconfigure" xorg or remove the driver and reinstall and check if it helps. If that doesn't help, I'd recommend you to re-install the default ones. 1st Try and reconfigure the Xserver conf, (assuming you're in the terminal, type the following): sudo dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg And after that, try and reboot your system. If that dint help ...



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