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As your Laptop graphics card shares the RAM, it is reasonable to assume that the shortfall in RAM is being used / reserved by the graphics card and therefore unavailable. It may be worth looking in to buying an additional 4GB RAM for you Laptop, as it has a spare slot.


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htop does it right, and reads free/used memory the same way as the line +/- buffers/cache shows in free -m output. Check this thread about the details: https://discuss.newrelic.com/t/why-do-free-and-or-top-show-different-memory-usage-than-the-new-relic-ui/273


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I would not bother about Ubuntu using half of my RAM, as it is usually used to cache information to be able to access them very fast. So caching as much as possible (e.g. from your hard disk) is the best Ubuntnu can do, as long as there is this much space left for other applications and no need to use the swap. But if you are interested in which processes ...


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Your memorychip in slot 2 might be defective, but I do not think so. Try swapping the two so your Nanya chip is in slot 1. Since they are different, they might have different timing (not notiable by us humans), but the bios will think the other is off. Swapping them will let the bios set its parameters by the Nanya chip (the lesser of the 2), and it should ...


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Short answer: YES. The limit of 32bit is exactly 4Gb. In case of Ubuntu even a bigger amount of ram can be used with 32bit if you are running a so-called 'PAE' kernel. The installer is smart enough to choose for you the best kernel based on the ram amount.


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32-bit processors can access 4GB of RAM maximum without PAE (physical address extension). With PAE, it can access 64GB of RAM.


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Hitting will not solve anything (since windows boot just fine), but it has to be done in order to teach who's the boss. Having less Swap memory than the actual RAM wouldn't be a problem. I had a linux mint xfce installed in a bootable USB, no SWAP partition and still worked ok. I think it would be a hardware problem... You said you switched the rams (I ...


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/var/run is tied to the specific running instance of a machine at a time due to storing PIDs of the running processes, I would only avoid placing that on a RAM disk if you are using a virtual machine and suspend the VM often. /var/lock is intended to prevent more than a single instance of a given application from running and thus should also be fine. If ...



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