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==> ulimit -a core file size (blocks, -c) 0 data seg size (kbytes, -d) unlimited scheduling priority (-e) 0 file size (blocks, -f) unlimited pending signals (-i) 4549 max locked memory (kbytes, -l) 64 max memory size (kbytes, -m) unlimited open files (-n) ...


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Ubuntu is a lightweight but powerful operating system needs at least 512MB of random access memory to start operating, so 1GB ram will work just fine. On top of that, a 32Bit architecture is also lightweight and runs on most machines, even ancient ones.. So it will work just fine on your Acer laptop


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A 32 Bit operating system will handle 2GB of Ram just fine. But you should consider upgrading to Ubuntu 14.04 or use 12.04, since 13.10 is no longer supported.


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I'm not aware of a simple/lean clock indicator, however I have a cunning alternative. 1) Write a shell script which gets the current date/time. 2) Install indicator-sysmonitor from here. 3) Add your shell script to indicator-sysmonitor as one of the sensors (and ditch the other sensors). 4) Set the update period to be one minute, more or less frequent as ...


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The issue, unbeknownst to me, was that I ran apt-get upgrade and forgot that I did. It had a kernel fix, and this version was unable to find /boot/efi, I suppose.


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Min specs are posted here - https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/SystemRequirements I've always installed as much as possible, but a Linux OS is much lighter than Windows. 4GB would be more than enough for your purpose. Ubuntu requires 512MB or more :) I personally recommend you buy/install 8GB+ within your budget as it wouldn't be wasted. You ...


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In most case, RAM limitation is based on north-bridge chipset on the system board. Your processor is quite old, maximum RAM support may be upto 4.0 GB (but installing 3.0GB is recommended).


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Did you check in BIOS setup? If it is not visible even there, then I guess there is something odd going on with the system (maybe one of the hardware forums can provide better guidance).


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I've had similar issues with dmidecode. I've found lshw to be helpful in instances like this. Open a terminal (CTRL-ALT-T) should open a terminal in the current Xwindows session. Alternatively you can switch to a terminal with CTRL-ALT-F1 (in which case you will have to login.) Regardless of how you get there, issue the command sudo lshw -c memory You ...


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When you mention "dynamic limits" using cgroups, you need to be a little more specific on what you are looking for. Its best to provide an example of what your app and cgroup does along with the cgconfig.conf. This would give us better picture. Although cgroups, allows limiting a process to certain amount of memory using memory.limit_in_bytes in ...


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Use the amd64-version, becuase your CPU (intel i5) is a 64-bit CPU.


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Despite what you say in your edit, I have to suspect you have bad RAM. Sometimes bad RAM creates more problems in one OS than in another, just because of the way each OS uses RAM. I therefore recommend that you run a memory-test program. On an EFI-based computer, the commercial (but free) memtest86 can do the job; there's a version that will run in the EFI, ...


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There is an 1100/900 ratio between the system and video memory. Since 900M is reserved for video at boot, the system can only see the remaining 1.1G. Source


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You can view detailed log of the processes and their resources consumption using htop. Install it typing sudo apt-get install htop and to run it type sudo htop. That should let you know what is using your resources. Once you figure it out, try killing that process and see if that works; if that worked, uninstall that application package or replace it with ...


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Apparently (I don't want to test this) GRUB2 has an option allowing the masking of bad memory cells, on a byte-by-byte basis. You will need to use the memtest boot options to determine the bad adresses, and list them in the grub configuration file as GRUB_BADRAM="0x01234567,0xfefefefe,0x89abcdef,0xefefefef" using your addresses, of course. The links I ...


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The sentence "32-bit operating systems don't support more than 4 GB of RAM" is false in general. The Physical Address Extension, which is CPU feature, allows the 32-bit operating system to address more than 4GB of RAM. It is true, however, that some editions of 32-bit Microsoft Windows system don't use Physical Address Extension due to marketing reasons and ...


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If it's showing that, you're probably using PAE. It's enabled by default. Why is it 5.8GB instead of 6GB? Do you have onboard graphics? It's probably reserving a chunk.



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