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Don't do anything: The Linux kernel is using as much memory as possible instead of letting it sit idle doing nothing by allocating free memory to the cache. You can control the cache, but doing so would make your system perform worse as all disk access would actually be disk access instead of cached disk access. (actually you should have moved to a server ...


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You might take a closer look into the upstart directory to see what's getting big, but try changing the fstab attributes by removing the "noatime". This is ram so that is not necessary like it is on the ssd (or other flash with limited lifespan). I also don't use the defaults, but never actually run as long as you do. Here's my settings, (ignore the ramfs ...


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This is your on-board video card stealing your main RAM as it has no VRAM of itself. 2 possibilities to solve this issue: Disable the on-board video not the GPU in your BIOS. On newer BIOSes, disable 'Hybrid' mode and set it to discrete GPU only (NVidia in your particular case) On older BIOSes, you can choose how much RAM to allocate to the on-board ...


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We've seen a problem with similar symptoms reported as https://bugzilla.gnome.org/show_bug.cgi?id=699625 There, the clipboard link grabbing of jdownloader continued to increase the memory usage of GIMP. If you use this tool, or something else that accesses the clipboard (KDE's klipper used to cause the same, IIRC), then you might be able to work around the ...


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I just discovered that my sistem doesn't have any swap space If this is true, then it's probably contributing to the problem. By using multiple VMs with large memory allocations, an amount of RAM that would normally be more than enough for normal use (8GB) starts becoming tight, which means your system won't be able to use as much cache, and will want ...


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With Apache prefork MPM configured with a ServerLimit of 256 you've configured it for a maximum memory usage of about 256 processes, roughly 15-30 MB of memory each in a typical PHP5 Apache module. Do the math and you know it will explode on a small server with a high number of clients. Instead, configure it with much tighter limits. E.g. <IfModule ...


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I think the problem is the Wubi install, it's probably running low on space. I think it's like a big file on a windows drive, that's used as your Ubuntu partition. Wubi is no longer a recommended method, and it doesn't work with Windows 8 at all. To fix it, you could resize the wubi "install", but it's probably a better solution to migrate wubi to a ...


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First, the only difference between server and desktop is what packages are installed by default; both run the same kernel. The maximum amount of memory supported on both is the maximum amount your hardware supports. The max for amd64 cpus is 2^48 bytes ( the architecture defines that the higher order bits are reserved ), but motherboards invariably have a ...


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Open a terminal window (Ctrl+Alt+T) and run df -h. The -h comes from human readable, to print sizes to traditional size unit. For me for example above command print: Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/sda6 14G 4.3G 8.9G 33% / udev 989M 4.0K 989M 1% /dev tmpfs 399M 864K 398M 1% /run none ...


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you need not to remove gnome(removing may cause more problems and broken package etc), just install kde-plasma-desktop from software center. its a light weight desktop and does not require must resource, unlike Unity which is a resource eater. at the time of logging you just select kde session.


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Somebody already did it here http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/68611/whats-the-difference-between-ctrl-z-and-kill-stop When I run a command (make on a large project) from the shell, I can type Ctrl-Z to stop the process and return to the shell. Subsequently, I can run fg to continue the process. I am not sure though if the RAM will ...


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Files read from disk are stored in the disk cache of Linux (RAM). You do not need to configure anything, this works out-of-the-box. If you would like have a filesystem backed by RAM rather than a disk, then you are looking for a "RAM disk" (not to be confused with the Linux ramdisk filesystem). The tmpfs filesystem stores all its contents in RAM (which ...


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Have monit keep an eye on those daemons: Monit is a small utility for managing and monitoring Unix systems. Monit conducts automatic maintenance and repair and can execute meaningful causal actions in error situations. For example, apache is using too much resources. Monit can stop or restart apache and send you an alert message [...] The ...


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Ubuntu Desktop The following covers Ubuntu and Edubuntu: Minimum Trusty Tahr (14.04 64-bit) 384 MB of RAM 700 MHz processor (about Intel Celeron or better) 5 GB of hard-drive space VGA capable of 1024x768 screen resolution Either a CD/DVD drive or a USB port for the installer media Recommended Trusty Tahr (14.04 64-bit) 1 GB of RAM Dual Core ...


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According to the Ubuntu wiki, Ubuntu requires a minimum of 1024 MB of RAM, but 2048 MB is recommended for daily use. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/SystemRequirements You may also consider a version of Ubuntu running an alternate desktop environment requiring less RAM, such as Lubuntu or Xubuntu. Lubuntu is said to run fine with 512 MB of ...


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This tool is not including disk cache in what it is reporting as "free". Your system is swapping in order to maintain a reasonably sized disk cache. Please see my answer to this question for more information. Here's an excerpt: Each application can use some of your memory. Linux uses all otherwise unoccupied memory (except for the last few Mb) as ...



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