Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

The video is not as clear as it could be, but if you are referring to the corrupted text and random lines/dots on the screen, I would say this is video card/GPU or video ram issue. You didn't say if it worked previously, and this is a new problem or if you have never got it working... but I would try a different graphics card.


0

The suggestions of setting your swap size to be 2x the size of your RAM are based on very old recommendations and don't apply to modern systems. At a very high level, swap is only used when you run more programs than you have memory to hold them, so the least used memory is written out to swap until it's needed again, at which point it's traded for ...


1

A RAMDISK is a block device that is backed by your RAM. Think of it as a way to use your RAM as a 'hard drive' in the sense you could read/write files to it, however all the limitations of RAM would still apply - notably that it's volatile and rebooting your server would cause all data on that drive to be lost. A Swap partition on the other hand is a way ...


1

There is no valid reason any more to have multiple partitions, esp. on personal desktops/laptops. This is even reflected in the default setting for the partition manager: everything on a single partition. I don't bother with a swap partition. IIRC, the Ubuntu installer won't let you install without one, so pick the smallest size you can get away with, and ...


0

You cannot run unequal quantities or different speeds or different voltages or basically any 2 RAMS that are not the same model and size without running into a problem. this is because the computer can only assign equal sizes of RAM for a task so if a task requires 3GB of RAM (theoretically) then there would be a fatal error. So there is no hardware ...


0

From the information you've given, your CPU is 64-bit. While I don't know why the extra RAM isn't currently showing under PAE, my recommendation is nevertheless to run a 64-bit build of Ubuntu on it. While PAE allows the system to make use of additional RAM, any given application is still limited to 3GB. Using 64-bit Ubuntu overcomes this. Software ...


0

This happened for me in a new install of Ubuntu 14.04. In my case, it had nothing to do with sysctl issues mentioned. Instead, the problem was that the swap partition's UUID was different during installation than it was after installation. So my swap was never enabled, and my machine would lock up after a few hours use. The solution was to check the ...


0

Solution: apt-get install linux-generic-lts-vivid This installs the latest kernel and Intel graphics drivers, which do not seem to be affected.


0

The Swap partition is necessary. However, IF the PC that has been installed on has large amounts of RAM, the swap partition may be used less. System itself will deal with RAM/swap usage. Should be no real need to tinker. With small RAM amounts, swap partition is crucial! In this situation, swap is needed so that the system has a 'place to go' once the RAM is ...


0

Swap partition is needed for the system itself and some apps go crazy if there is no swap partition, and it is used for hibernation too. So I think it would worth that amount of space it needs.


0

I would suggest that if your old computer can boot from a cd/dvd or USB memory stick, to try a few different live-cds. I have tried many many different distros on older (and newer) machines. My prefered distro is: Puppy Linux Lucid v5.28 http://puppylinux.org/wikka/Puppy528, which is semi-compatible with Ubuntu 12.04. (You can find newer versions of PL ...


0

Here is my $0.02.... RAM: According to Kingston.com you have a max of 2GB with 2 sockets. If someone has been able to have 4GB installed, and usable, then there may have been a BIOS upgrade that enabled this. I do not think 8GB would be possible. DDR2 800MHz is the top for you. DDR3 will not work. 915GV is the chipset. If BIOS is reporting 82915G/GV/910GL, ...


1

Inactive memory is basically a cache, which makes consecutive operations faster. For example, that makes the second launch of Firefox significantly faster, than the first one. You can be quite sure that this does not make your system slower. When there is a need of RAM, Linux (the kernel) can drop these immediately. So actually, what you think as a ...


0

You can not get Ubuntu use more RAM that it is needed for the system and applications. Actually you do not need so much RAM, unless you use virtual machines or some specific applications. You can utilize your RAM to create temporary partitions. That may speed up your system. Look at this answer for guides.


0

If you're having this issue using Ruby on Rails with Digital Ocean it's likely because you have too little RAM. Try upping the RAM from 512MB to 1GB, that fixed it for me.



Top 50 recent answers are included