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0

Your 10 GB of memory is being recognized just fine. But you have a 32-bit OS. This means that each user-level process (like memtester) only sees a 32-bit address space; inherently, no single process can access more than 4 GB of memory (and often less). You have PAE enabled. This means that different pieces of your 10 GB of memory can be allocated to ...


7

No, you do not have to make any system changes. The new RAM size will be detected automatically. If possible, select a model from the same vendor. Otherwise, get one with similar specifications : clock rate Mhz - and the same amount of RAM.


0

Why not using memtester: memtester Utility for testing the memory subsystem Install sudo apt-get install memtester Usage please add working examples


0

You only have a total of 1GB from which 292MB are free. Depending on what you are running, I would say that is normal. The 69MB are without the cache portion which can be freed at any time when needed. To see which programs are really using the most memory, you should sort by the RES column in htop (hit F6 for sorting). But if you really have memory ...


0

A good place to start is to track the statistics in /proc/meminfo, this has a considerable amount of detail on global memory utilisation. I suggest capturing the output from /proc/meminfo periodically (say every 30 minutes or so) and one can then examine this to see where the memory allocation growth is occurring. From that, you will have at least some ...


2

Run this command sudo top Find out the culprint process and then kill it sudo kill -9 <pid> Also look for some of the services that might be always running. For more details, refer to this link


0

I took them out, switched their positions, put them back. It works now. Probably they just weren't in all the way.


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On my Ubuntu 14.04 VPS I had to run the following: sudo apt-get install linux-image-extra-$(uname -r) sudo apt-get install zram-config The first line installs the zram kernel module.


5

No you don't have the reinstall the OS but i will suggest add a swap partition as you might need it.


2

You do not need to reinstall Ubuntu , every thing will run fine. It will automatically detect that you have upgraded your ram.


5

No. You don't need to reinstall your OS.


0

It turned out that there was a .conf in /etc/sysctl.d/ that had the line setting vm.swappiness = 1 Deleting that allows swappiness to be set from /etc/sysctl.conf file. I guess the takeaway from this issue is that a .conf file in /etc/sysctl.d/ can override an entry in /etc/sysctl.conf


3

When a process calls free() it does not return the memory immediately back to system, instead it returns it back to the heap owned by that process. The heap either uses anonymous memory mapping for large chunks or sbrk() to shrink or grow the heap. Memory from the heap is returned back to the system when it is unmap'd or the heap shrinks with sbrk(). At ...



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