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Absolutely it is, and mdadm is indeed the tool with which you would want to do this. When you boot up your live USB or CD to install Ubuntu, create the logical RAID devices via CLI prior to beginning then installation. Here is a link that nicely lays out how to use mdadm to set up your software RAID devices: RAID setup - Linux Raid Wiki After setting up ...


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If your motherboard offers this, there is generally a Hard Drive setting in the BIOs that will allow you to change the setup from IDE to RAID. Once you have made that change, you should be able to configure RAID but you would need to make sure that your motherboard supports SATA RAID or something similar, depending on your setup.


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Since the Desktop Package of Ubuntu 14.04 does not allow for RAID installation I found the best route is to install the Server Package of Ubuntu 14.04 and add the ubuntu-desktop after. Once partitioned, configured, and installed at a command line prompt you can enter the following to install ubuntu-desktop: sudo apt-get install ubuntu-desktop When the ...


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The ability to create partitions from a volume applies to RAID and any device exposed to the OS like a single SATA/IDE HDD, they are all just block storage volumes to the OS. 2 potential advantages, you essentially move the configuration of your storage from a hardware level to an OS level and you would less reliant on your RAID controller manufacturers ...


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Ok I think I can answer your question. The partition should not be unallocated. If you use Gparted, go to the program and right click on the unallocated button. Click "new". You will see a drop down menu. Select ntfs. I hope this helps.


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As always, you should back up your data before doing any of this !! You can change the type with fdisk sudo fdisk /dev/sdc Display the partition list ; p The partition(s) on the disc will be listed, along with some information. Look for what is listed under the "System" column (it should say it is a raid member). Change the type by pressing ; t ...


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I got the same problem with a fake bios raid. Since my raid is needed to boot, I had to put a script in /usr/share/initramfs-tools/scripts/init-premount to assemble the raid: #!/bin/sh mdadm --assemble --scan Then I update the initram by running the command: update-initramfs -u I try to make my raid work with dmraid but only the raid0 set was working. ...


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SOLVED Boot into the system on one disk (ie degraded RAID array), and in /etc/default/grub, set: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="" to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="rootdelay=90" then run update-grub Once that's done, reinstall the disk you removed and re-sync the RAID array using the good disk (Should normally do this by default). Then boot like normal. This is ...


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Well first of all a little more information on your setup would be nice so I could fill your partition names etc. As you said you marked it as failed and removed it (I guess with mdadm --manage /dev/md0 --remove /dev/sdb1 or whatever your raid/physical partitions are for every partition). Did you do this in a live system? Meaning is this a machine you can ...


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Sometimes a reshaping will sit at speed=0K/sec because the backup file failed to be created, or was lost during the processing. The solution, in this case, was supplied by Neil Brown in response to an email to linux-raid@vger.kernel.org. You should be able to simply stop the array and re-assemble with a different backup file and the magic flag ...


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There are no advantages to fake RAID or expensive real hardware RAID controllers that I know of. The advantage of software RAID is that your RAID sets are not dependent on a certain controller or format and that you receive bugfixes and software updates easily through the software update process.


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If you haven't found an answer yet, this should work: MegaCli64 -LDRecon ShowProg L0 -a0 This website has a lot of useful MegaCLI commands: http://artipc10.vub.ac.be/wordpress/2011/09/12/megacli-useful-commands/


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Pragmatically: Back up all your data to an external harddrive. Destroy your raid array. When you recreate your raid array, use the XFS file system, ESPECIALLY if you are using this for large files. If not XFS, use EXT4. BTRFS is not a performance filesystem, and raid support is still in its infancy. Also, the developers of BTRFS outright say that XFS is ...


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Well first of all, if you change to RAID 0, you would need to create the array again, which means you would lose all your data. I think it's important to be aware of the risks involved with RAID 0 though. There is an increased risk of array, or drive failure resulting in complete and total data loss on the RAID 0 array. If you are determined to use RAID 0, ...


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There is a meta package called ubuntu-desktop that contains all packages you need for the desktop. Install it with: sudo apt-get install ubuntu-desktop


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My OS works again. I had to transport it another PC and boot from there, with the help of the "boot repair disk" Switched the grub line to "Text" mode instead of splash and finally I installed openSSH to it so I can login the OS remotely. Thanks everybody for the kind help.


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I have the same machine (with lower specs though) and did install Fedora 20 on it. It would also not boot correctly because of KMS (kernel Mode Setting) incompatibilities with the nVidia Quadro FX1800. In the boot screen (grub) I edited the boot line to add the nomodeset setting to disable KMS and be able to boot. But it has an impact on the Nouveau driver ...


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Well bcache is an option on 14.04. dm-cache (for which lvmcache is apparently just a friendly frontend) seems faster according to benchmarks but seems quite painful to use directly. That should still be an option if you like, but it's a slog. You could manually update (or find a PPA for) lvm2. This package is largely just a toolchain for exploiting Kernel ...


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It is true, that the ubiquity installer does not know about mdadm software raid devices. Also it is true, that the live-cd is missing the mdadm raid administration tool. However, doing some work by hand, it is very much possible to install Ubuntu on RAID1. In the following I will assume two identical hard disks (/dev/sd[ab]) which will be used completely ...



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