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I don't see a way to delete my question, and the options for closing do not apply. The answer to this is either to simply enter the repair function when Live Booting and mark all the drive partitions that were removed as part of md0 and md1 again (swap and RAID5 ext4), or the answer is very complicated and requires data recovery. Neither were enticing. ...


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Very short answer: Yes! "/" and swap on SSD, "/home" (and any other files) on RAID-5


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I was able to fix it. Upon inspecting the output of sudo parted -l and cat /proc/mdstat as well as looking in /etc/mdadm/mdadm.conf I noticed that the device labels for the harddisks seem to have changed after I tried adding noatime in /etc/fstab. My ssd used to have the label /dev/sda this then changed to /dev/sde So md could not auto assemble the raid ...


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I had an issue like this on an HP server with an internal raid controller. It was listed as supported on all the HP and Ubuntu hardware matrices, but it turns out that the controller was only supported on Windows, not Linux. However, if you have a hardware RAID controller, do you see a prompt when the system POSTs (power on self test), saying something like ...


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So you have four disks, one SSD that stands alone, and three 3TB drives in a RAID5 set. It sounds like you won't be doing much on your home directory, with your web, media, plex, etc. on the RAID array. So I would install the OS (root) and swap on the SSD and then mount the RAID device on a directory and carve it up into your requisite subdirectories. That ...


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If you have a desktop, you can add all the drives and ignore the "swapping" steps below; just replace the last "swap" with "take out the old drives" Swap the secondary hard disk with one of the new hard disks Boot the Clonezilla LiveCD, Do a disk2disk, from the old HD to the new one (and put a little sticker on it with "New 1") Shut down Swap: Take out ...


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As it turns out, the true underlying issue was that added at the end of my question: since the machine doesn't boot from UEFI, grub requires a dedicated partition (2MB is reportedly more than enough) with the "bios_grub" flag at the beginning of each drive (each drive you plan on being able to boot from if the array ever became degraded, at least). One can ...


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Grub2 is fully RAID and LVM aware. In fact you do not need a separate /boot partition at all. You need also grub-install to all of the drives in the raid5. The Ubuntu grub-pc package will prompt you to check off all of the drives you want it installed on and install it for you.


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It turns out an xfs_repair is all I needed, it just took a long time since the drives are so large, wipefs doesn't delete the secondary superblocks so xfs is able to recover itself


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I don't know about FS recovery exactly like this, and I don't know if XFS has backup superblocks or something that could help. Maybe wipefs didn't erase much, it says When used without options -a or -o, it lists all visible filesystems and the offsets of their signatures. Does running wifefs -n (the -n , --no-act to make sure nothing else gets erased ...


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Yes, that is possible, but it is not going to be a good solution. You can add pretty much every block device to a software RAID. But the limitations of that device will limit the whole array. In case of USB the limiting factors are speed (yes, even with USB 3.0) and reliability. Also the devices will have to be plugged in all the time. If one is not ...


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You need to select the actual disk drives ( /dev/sda, /dev/sdb, etc ) for where to install grub to.


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It looks like sdc1 is not assembled. I am using mdadm as well, it does not work reliable using scan operations - I always assemble them manually. So try the following: Make sure your array is stopped: mdadm --stop /dev/md127 Then reassemble your array with the following line: mdadm --assemble /dev/md127 /dev/sdb1 /dev/sdc1 /dev/sdd1 /dev/sde1 Now ...


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okay, i figured it out. For some reason it was writing the EFI boot partition automatically to the raid array. So I just mounted an Gig partition on the ssd as EFI and it fixed everything.


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Providing this answer in the proper format rather than just a link from a comment. "This can happen after an unclean shutdown (like a power fail). Usually removing and re-adding the problem devices will correct the situation." Refer to your specific drive configuration and mdadm version specific documentation for how to do this. Another alternative is ...


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Looking for love in all the wrong places .... Thank you psusi and ppetraki for your helpful replies. You each gave me additional insights into how RAID functions under Linux. It turns out that there was nothing wrong with the disks or the mdadm commands that I was using to create and manipulate the RAID arrays. Once I discovered the ata8 kernel messages, ...



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