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I finally made it: THe problem was that dmraid (the former mdadm) wos installed which is legacy, I uninstalled that via apt-get. Then created the raid with mdadm -C /dev/md/imsm /dev/sda /dev/sdb /dev/sdc /dev/sdj -n 4 -e imsm mdadm -C /dev/md/vol0 /dev/md/imsm –n 3 –l 10 And now the output looks like this (AWESOME :)


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The best way to edit partitions is to use GParted tool. I used it to resize partitions on my laptop and it worked great, no data loss at all. Although, to do it, you need the partitions you are working with to be inactive, so you need to make a live CD/USB with GParted. The instructions are given on their website here. Then, you should be able to boot from ...


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Ubuntu (the Linux kernel) can handle both RAID-1 or RAID-5. Either of them can tolerate the failure of one disk. It will also tell you which drive is no longer in function. Yes the recovery process is automatic: all you have to do is to add a new disk to your degraded (i.e., faulty) RAID array. You can even grow your RAID-5 array that is add new disks to ...


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The Linux kernel supports software RAID (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/SoftwareRAID) or even Logical Volume Management (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Lvm) without any cards or extra hardware. It depends what sort of RAID you want to implement, but basically the steps are: install the new drive, and create a new, degraded array (that is only the ...


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You can copy the disks with the dd command into files (or partitions which might even be better): take care to copy each disk as a whole (and not only some partitions of them). You can assemble with mdadm the new files or partitions as you suggest. I think you are right: their order should not count. Trying to mount partitions with another file system does ...


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Your array is not listed in /etc/fstab, therefore it is not automatically mounted. If you want it to be automatically mounted in a specific location, you need to add it.


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Probably the easiest thing to do is to completely forgo RAID and to do this: 1) Use Windows Disk Defragment to clean up the drive 2) Use GParted to shrink the Windows partition to 200GB (From now on, follow only #a, or only #b instructions, but not both) 3a) In the Ubuntu installer select 'Install alongside Windows 7' if it's available 3b) If it's not ...


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From what I recall the only alternate now that carries the software raid 0 option is Lubuntu. Then when you get to partitioning you have to create a partition on each drive and under the use as setting select use as raid instead of ext3. once that part is done you can finish setting up the raid by selecting the partitions and then setting the file system ...


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Always use hardware RAID if you can afford it as a software RAID might give OS compatibility problems... (Dual-boot with Windows, Using a boot CD to repair your system, ...) Use RAID5: write speed is a bit slower then the disks all by themselves, but read speed is superior. As to which controller: buy the most expensive one your budget allows you to buy ...


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The installer should default to the correct location, but if not, make sure it is set to install grub to the whole array ( /dev/mapper/something on older editions of Ubuntu, /dev/mdXX on recent releases if you have an Intel fakeraid ) rather than an individual drive ( /dev/sda ).


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TRIM support was added to the device-mapper driver at some point ( that's what dmraid uses ), but I don't recall if it was in 14.04. 15.04 now uses mdadm to support intel fakeraids ( thanks to a lot of code contributed by Intel ), and I'm fairly certain that does.


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I am going to try boot-repair. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair#A1st_option_:_get_a_disk_including_Boot-Repair


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The official Ubuntu Guide has the full instruction set, but in summary run the following command: sudo mdadm --assemble --scan


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This should be done automatically at the end of the Ubuntu server/desktop install. See this guide - Official Ubuntu Guides On my server, the boot loader got installed on both the HDD's directly (Raid1). If that fails, you can run this command for both your hard drives: grub-install /dev/sdX X: is the letter of hard drives.


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I have been going at it all wrong. The simplest way is to burn your Alternate install on the usb, run it, and when you have to partition the disk, just create one partitions for "/" and one partitions for swap. Repeat this for both disks, and you are done. Make sure to turn the Boot flag "on". The installer takes care of the rest


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After some messing around, it seems this issue was caused by the RAID not being setup on the partitions of the disk. The RAID was created using the command: mdadm --create /dev/md0 --metadata 1.2 /dev/sdb /dev/sdc /dev/sdd Creating partitions and changing it to: mdadm --create /dev/md0 --metadata 1.2 /dev/sdb1 /dev/sdc1 /dev/sdd1


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And here is the question - would it not be better for me to set up rsync between the disks or something that can keep them in sync? Then I don't need to worry about RAID issues, slow write speed due to double write etc etc... Setting up a full scheduled rsync between two "individual" disks is just making a worse, manual RAID1. If 1 TB is enough for you ...


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The problem may have been not addressing the RAID partitions on the devices instead of the device. Using: mdadm --examine /dev/sdb mdadm --examine /dev/sdb1 you can check for which superblock is the one you want for your raid. Then, you have to choose the actual block, e.g.: mdadm --assemble /dev/md0 /dev/sdb2 /dev/sdc2



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