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That has nothing to do with the distro. It sounds like your board is a little funky when it comes to general Linux support. http://www.amazon.com/review/R1LPS5LC21G3ZA/ref=cm_cr_pr_viewpnt#R1LPS5LC21G3ZA This board is not directly compatible with Linux, specifically the built-in Ethernet. In order for it to work you must enable IOMMU in BIOS, but ...


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You could add an entry to /etc/fstab: /dev/md127 /media/server ext4 defaults 0 0 Make sure that /media/server is present: sudo mkdir -p /media/server You could use the UUID of the partition instead of /dev/md127. The UUID of a filesystem is unlikely to change unless you alter it, whereas the partition may change its identifier and be named md0 ...


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Here's what I did (I asked adaptec at http://ask.adaptec.com/app/account/questions/detail/i_id/117462) Go to http://ask.adaptec.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/17202 and download the minimally tested driver Essentially follow the instructions in Ubuntu Server/Ubuntu 12.04 LTS/Ubuntu 12.04.2 thru 12.04.5 LTS/Installing Ubuntu 12.04.2 thru 12.04.X LTS on ...


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Did you try Lubuntu installer which still provide alternate ISO image to properly setup RAID ? http://cdimages.ubuntu.com/lubuntu/releases/14.04.1/release/lubuntu-14.04.1-alternate-amd64.iso I guess you already wiped all Windows related partitions to start clean right ?


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I managed to mount the raid 1 array and recover my data. This is what I used: sudo fuseext2 -o ro -o sync_read -o allow_other /dev/sda4 /mnt/raid For more information refer to this excellent blog article: [Recovering data from a WD Mybook Live 2TB / 3TB (or ...


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Even though this thread is a bit old... I've found that the tutorial posted by Mike is missing a step. After "Installing" step 6, you need to set up the mount point for the RAID device. Otherwise, you will get an error saying "no root file system is defined". This can be done by the following steps: 1. Select "#1" under the "RAID1 device #0" partition. ...


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There are many distributed file systems available for Linux. These are more geared towards server applications like cloud computing, and include the ability to mirror data between computers as well. Free options include Lustre and GlusterFS. Using software RAID is probably the most common way to do what you want though.


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The RAID normally done in BIOS is not full RAID, it is basically "RAID Assistance". It is there to help Windows do RAID as Windows cannot do full software RAID on it's own without some sort of hardware assistance. Linux on the other hand can do software RAID on it's own without any hardware assistance. Trying to use the "RAID Assistance" actually gets in the ...


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@Gunfus, Yes, I have resolved the problem. The issue in my particular issue was, that thewe super block of my ext4 partition was corrupted. There's instructions on how to fix it: http://linuxexpresso.wordpress.com/2010/03/31/repair-a-broken-ext4-superblock-in-ubuntu/


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If I understand correctly, what you want is moving the /home folder to your RAID disk. In that way, users would have a directory (their $HOME directory) in which they could do everything they want. In case you understand not fully how it works, Unix has a standard directory tree, created on installation under the root /. By default, all this is created on ...


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The BIOS boot partition(s) must be created on the disk(s) not the RAID device. One BIOS boot partition is enough for you as your system won't boot with one disk only. Linux soft RAID works on partitions, not drives. So you'll have to create one partition for the BIOS boot and one for the RAID. You could have to create a third partition. /boot can be on ...


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If you create your RAID in the installer it won't sync the whole RAID partition. Not sure if you do it later. Did you convert a standard partition to RAID? Wait for the sync to finish. Shutdown and remove one drive. Check that it still boots. Shutdown and put the drive back. Re-start and wait for the re-sync to finish. Shutdown and remove the next drive. ...


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FIXED!!!!! Turns out the controller created the array volumes with write-protection on, so the installer detected the disks, but marked them as unusable. I found this out by running fdisk from the installer debug console, and it told me that the filesystems were read-only. I then found the setting on the controller and disabled it. I have a running ...


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Thanks for your answer. Based on that, I moved forward. I was able to successfully migrate the RAID volume. One detail that complicated the move was that I had the RAID array as part of the LVM Group. So once I had the new system re-built, the RAID array was recognized, but I was unable to mount any of the LVMs. I ended up having to use ...


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mdadm stores all the necessary info to reassemble a RAID in the volume header. As soon as you configure it correctly in your new system it should pick up the existing volumes.



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