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My guess is that alsa mixer works for you too? On my system, the sounds settings are active only while pulseaudio is running. To start the daemon manually: pulseaudio -D If it gets in the way of something else you can stop it by pulseaudio -k


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Just wanted to report that after upgrading to Kubuntu 15.04, and KDE 5, switching between bluetooth profiles works fine.


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I have solved the issue. I found a setting in the alsamixer called auto mute, disabling this did the trick! exact steps: open terminal and type "alsamixer" Press f6 and choose the soundcard making the popping noise. Navigate to automute and press down. Hopefully, this can save other the trouble I been through


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The XDG_RUNTIME_DIR solution worked for me, but there is no need to create a file in /etc/systemd/system. Just add this line in /etc/init.d/mpd: export XDG_RUNTIME_DIR=/run/user/1000 I already have specified mpd to run as my own user and "audio" group in /etc/mpd.conf.


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I had the exact same problem, I have a dual boot with windows 8.1. When when my windows updated, I came back with windows and I had sound on microphones but nothing on speakers. I did a lot of search and things like this answer but it didn't work. Finally from some article and this post found out that my speakers are put to sleep by windows, 1-restarted ...


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While some of the other responses are useful, they seem to miss the most common issue with microphone background noise, and that is the base volume. Many people set the base volume on the microphone to full. This overdrives the sound when there is sound, and makes noise when there isn't. This is largely because most of us have grown dependent on ...


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It is hard to tell over the static but for me it sounds like one of the default pidgin sounds. It could also be the systembell. To Further debug you sound you could kill the existing pulseaudio server, with pulseaudio -k. And launch pulseaudio -vvvvv It could be that you have any kind of IM running in background? Is there anything visible running in your ...


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I wrote this to be as fast and simple to use as possible - this script will work great in tandem with a quick access terminal like Yakuake or Guake: #!/bin/bash #################################################### # # Use this CLI util to toggle pulse audio <--> jackd # # This program will start by shutting down the # pulseaudio systems and starting ...


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I have also Intel HD Graphics 4000 with AMD Radeon 8500 2048 MB. Everything you have to do is to go to Sound Preferences from system settings and change the device in "Play sound through" and in "Settings for HDMI / DisplayPort" change mode, Digital Stereo HDMI output or Digital Surround 5.1 HDMI Output.


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It might correct sound card has not been selected. You can select the sound card in the F6 key in alsamixer. (If you can use a GUI environment, pavucontrol is recommended.)


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I managed to solve this, although not a optimal solution, it'll work. I installed PulseAudio Volume Control. Then went to "Configuration" and under the correct sound card, I chose the correct output (Analog 5.1). Then it shows up in sound settings again. Although, if I change the device in Sound Settings, I sometimes have to open PulseAudio Volume ...


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options snd_usb_audio index=0 This options tells the snd-usb-audio driver that when it loads, it must claim the first sound card index. However, If that sound card index is already used by some other driver (snd-hda-intel in your case), loading fails. In theory, you would need to prevent such conflicts by telling all drivers which index to use. But a ...


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I follow the below workaround whenever I connect laptop to a TV: Connect HDMI cable to TV and switch on the TV. Run the below command on a console (It worked without sudo) pulseaudio -k Open Sound settings, you should see "HDMI/Display Port" entry under Output tab.


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Yes there is, it is called pasystray sudo apt-get install pasystray press ALT + F2 and type pasystray to start it up. Next, you need to add the "notification area" to the xfce panel if not already added. Finally, you will see a speaker icon on the desktop panel. Click the icon to adjust the speaker. Go to startup applications and add it there to ...


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For pulseaudio there is module-switch-on-connect designed to switch the output sink to any new sink as soon as a connection was established. To test this module we can issue the following command in a terminal: pactl load-module module-switch-on-connect After restarting the pulseaudio server (pulseaudio -k) this module will be unloaded again. In case we ...


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It is possible in "Audio Mixser Plugin". Probably it is included in the xfce4-mixer package.


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The issue was the result of a kernel bug Ubuntu's kernel version 3.19.0-18. The issue was fixed in a later update.


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The following worked for me. There's an option in /etc/bluetooth/audio.conf called AutoConnect=true. Make sure this is not commented (i.e. no hashes) (change #AutoConnect=true to AutoConnect=true) This will make pulseaudio recognize the device.


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It was fixed by running the following in the terminal sudo apt-get install --reinstall alsa-base alsa-utils linux-sound-base pulseaudio -k sudo alsa force-reload service pulseaudio start Now amixer and pulseaudio gives me output and I could change the script. But it still seems like I'm missing sound from the laptop itself.


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Looks like you hit the bug https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1457369. It will be fixed in 3.19.0-20.20 which will be released the end of this week. If you can't wait, you can either downgrade your kernel or grab 3.19.0-20.20 from trusty-proposed (see https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Testing/EnableProposed)


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See the answers on this post: HDMI sound option disappears when I install the latest updates to Ubuntu Vivid 15 Apparently it is a bug in the latest kernel. Revert to an earlier version or wait until next kernel update. edit: this should probably have been a 'comment', not an 'answer'. Sorry.



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