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thank you for aswering :) DNS were all rights, I was doing some trial in local domain before putting them on production.. I solved the issue more easier (I don't have index.html or any other files, I have only folder name).. Finally, I think this would be helpful for someone, the configuration is: upstream tomcat_server { server ...


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You may want to check your DNS setup. I also use multiple subdomains which I create on the fly for various applications using web frameworks such as Python Django or Ruby on Rails. A typical example is at mydomain.com I may want to have myapp.mydomain.com where myapp is a framework served at my_server_IP:some_port. In order to achieve such thing (many ...


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Go to your system settings --> network, select network proxy and then manual. Here you can enter your proxy settings, and save them. After that open up a terminal, open your bashrc file in ~/.bashrc and add the following line; export {http,https,ftp}_proxy=http://**YOURUSERNAME**:**YOURPASSWORD**@**HOST**:**PORT**/


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You most likely have http_proxy set either as a system-wide setting (either in /etc/profile or in /etc/bash.bashrc) or as your private setting (in ~/profile, ~/bashrc or wherever your sysadmin decided to put it). You can get-rid of that per bash session using unset: unset http_proxy unset https_proxy Or you disable it permanently when you locate where ...


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libdconf0 now not available. Available one is libdconf1 sudo apt-get install libdconf1


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You must tell apt-get to use your proxy. In a shell, type: export _http_proxy=htp://user:password@proxyserver:port apt-get update If this works, you can make the change persistent: vi /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/proxy and then Acquire::http::Proxy "htp://user:password@proxyserver:port";


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If you are trying to use an SSH connection with an HTTP proxy, it won't work. Github offers Git over HTTPS as well. So try: git clone https://github.com/myusername/myrepo.git


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This is something you cannot fullfill. If you decide to communicate via TCP between nginx and your application, localhost will always be able to access the ports -- this is the way, nginx is doing it. You could reconfiure it to use sockets, but this something needs to be done starting by your applciation nginx is the reverse proxy for.


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Take a look at my answer here: http://askubuntu.com/a/424542/251032 PS: I know this is a pretty old question, but since it took me a couple of years to figure out the details of how to use apt with a proxy, it's possible that an answer is still welcome.


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Test this: sudo su apt-get update apt-get install ntlmaps Configure it: domain, username, password, proxyserver.net, port Files: /etc/bash.bashrc export http_proxy=http://127.0.0.1:5865 export https_proxy=http://127.0.0.1:5865 export ftp_proxy=http://127.0.0.1:5865 /etc/environment http_proxy=http://127.0.0.1:5865 https_proxy=http://127.0.0.1:5865 ...


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You can also try the following commands. For http connection - export: http_proxy="http://username:password@proxy_server_address:port_no" For https connection - export: https_proxy="https://username:password@proxy_server_address:port_no" And likewise for ftp and other connections.


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sometimes the remote site doesn't accept proxies.. in that case you can use wget with --no-proxy in order to skip going through proxy for example you are wgetting some remote file, the syntax would be: wget --no-proxy <path of remote file>



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