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Python2.7 and Python3 are already installed in lubuntu as in any ubuntu-based distribution. So you already can use both python versions in few ways. way 1 Open a text editor (like Leafpad which is part of Lubuntu, but I prefer to use SublimeText 3). Write there your program. Save it (i.e. as your_file.py) Then open terminal in directory where you saved ...


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Answering my question for posterity, in case anyone ever does something similar, which is highly unlikely! In my tests, I had only been connecting to the box with vagrant ssh, and was typing in my original terminal window. I changed my Vagrant file to include a gui, with config.vm.provider "virtualbox" { |v| v.gui = true }, and vagrant launched a CLI ...


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Yes, and no. Linux and Ubuntu is more widely used by programmers, than the average - 20.5% of programmers use it as opposed to around 1.50% of the general population (that doesn't include Chrome OS, and that's just desktop OS). Note, however that both Mac OS X and Windows are used more: Why is this? There are a number of reasons. Linux has less (not ...


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You can either copy your executable to some folder in your $PATH (if you compiled your app statically) to see what is in your $PATH type: echo $PATH /usr/local/bin is probably the best choice. So copy it there by: sudo cp yourexe /usr/local/bin Or you can add additional directory to your PATH. You can do this by putting: ...


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I used this one ppa:ubuntu-lxc/lxd-stable that has the near to latest version


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The command for compilation should be gcc fork.c but you had mistakenly written cc fork.c , so that is the reason why fatal error occurred.


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Found with a google search 'bash scripting tutorial'...it was the first link provided and seems to offer basic and advanced bash scripting guides, perfect for your needs. http://linuxconfig.org/bash-scripting-tutorial



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