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You can add a custom keyboard command using the following steps: Go to System Settings Click Keyboard Open the Shortcuts tab Click the "+" symbol near the bottom of the window Give your command a title. E.g. System Monitor In the Command field, enter gnome-system-monitor Click Apply Click Disabled on your newly created shortcut Enter the key combination ...


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Generally pidof(8) and in more complicated cases pgrep(1) are excellent tools to find the ID of some processes. If you want to find all children of a particular process, you need to dig through the /proc file system yourself. Let's assume you're looking for the children of process 2345: for PROCSTAT in /proc/[0-9]*/stat; do read -r PID PROCNAME STATUS ...


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Are you open to using other utility cpulimit? 1) Install cpulimit by issuing sudo apt-get install cpulimit 2) Limit the process in question like this (say we want to restrict java to use not more than 30 % of CPU) cpulimit -e java -l 30


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Yes. You can use the ps tool to list all processes and their state: ps -eo s,pid If we want to parse this, we need to remove the header: ps h -eo s,pid Now we are going to pipe it to an awk command so that we can only print the pids with a state of "S" (sleeping): ps h -eo s,pid | awk '{ if ($1 == "S" || $1 == "D") { print $2 } }' And now you have a ...


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If you know the process ID (pid), then you can run: top -p <pid1>,<pid2>... And to get the list of process IDs for a given process name you can use: pgrep <process-name>


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you can do that with nice and renice command in the terminal. for example: sudo renice -n -15 -u username The options are: -n=priority from -20 to 20 (where -20 is highest) -p=process id (found in task manager) -u=all events user started Or do you mean something else?



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