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It is possible. You could use netstat -a | egrep 'Proto|LISTEN'


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The kernel beneath the ubuntu platfrom uses some process-scheduling algorithm to schedule the process by accessing its PCB (Process Control Block). PCB is a datastructure in linux OS where the whole information is kept regarding the process and the processID is also kept in that data structure. You can also see the PCB in linux under /proc/


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I'd break your problem into 2 parts: 1) How do I find the processes started by me? Run this: ps -u `whoami` The whoami is just in case you don't know the name of the account you are using, otherwise just type the name of the account without the back quotes. This will list all processes that can be deleted by your account. 2) The ps command will list ...


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...All processes in Linux respond to signals. Signals are an os-level way of telling programs to terminate or modify their behavior. How To Send Processes Signals by PID The most common way of passing signals to a program is with the kill command. As you might expect, the default functionality of this utility is to attempt to kill a process: kill ...


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Check if your program is controlled by cpulimit application # cpulimit -l 30 /bin/yourprogram & The above command will start application but will not allow application to use more than 30% of cpu cpulimit.1.html cpulimit examples


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As muru already pointed out grep leaves trace of itself in the ps, however, there is a small workaround for using grep with ps : use double quotes and brackets on the first letter like so ps aux | grep "[f]irefox" (Source: http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/74186/85039).


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And this is why you shouldn't grep or otherwise parse the output of ps for matching commands, but use tools like pgrep and pidof. When you run ps | grep foo, the grep foo process is also listed by ps - therefore grep foo matches itself along with any other foo processes. The exact same thing happens when you do echo $(ps aux | awk '/firefox/...) - the awk ...


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Full screen terminal applications ( think nano ) that are badly written/broken can fail to resume properly in that they don't repaint the screen correctly after its contents changed while the program was suspended. Well behaved applications notice when they have been suspended and resumed and will repaint the screen properly. That's about it.



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