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1

This bug has been resolved: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/policykit-1-gnome/+bug/1512002 You can install the updated package (must enable 'proposed' repo) which modifies the policy: /usr/share/polkit-1/actions/org.freedesktop.accounts.policy - <allow_any>auth_self</allow_any> - <allow_inactive>auth_self</allow_inactive> ...


2

For viewing logs in real-time, use tail -f -n [number of lines] [file]. -f is for follow, which will pipe the appended log data to stdout (e.g. console window) as the data is written to the file -n is for number of lines to follow A good place to start would be /var/log/syslog. This is the default log file for many system events, services, and ...


1

All activity is pretty broad. To add to the existing answers: dmesg dumps the kernel log to the terminal. Man page. strace allows real-time tracing of all system calls from single a given process. Man page. Ubuntu page. perf "strace on steroids." Perf is a very powerful tool for tracing events at various different granularities across the system, ...


6

Many things you simply cannot spot, because they are handled inside the application or process without any communication to "the outer world". a random (totally incomplete) list of a few of the most important tools you could use however to monitor specific sections of what is going on: the top command: from man top: The top program provides a dynamic ...


6

Try history command, it displays the last $HISTSIZE (default 500) executed command in terminal. journalctl command displays log messages, if system uses systemd. ps -aux shows running processes, can be used with ps -aux|grep xxxx to select a specific process.


1

Then nethogs command line utility will show you the network usage of every process on your system. You can install it by using sudo apt-get install nethogs Then just type in "nethogs" into the terminal and as soon as the process starts to use your bandwidth it will be listed.


0

The 'ps' command only displays processes. htop by default shows each thread as a separate process. Which implies 'htop' will always show more items than 'ps'. We can show per-thread statistics with the 'ps' command as well. for ex: ps -Lf | grep xyz.sh Which one to use ? If you are looking for threads status of a single process - htop If you are ...


1

The way to do it with qdbus and org.ayatana.bamf interface. List of open applications by .desktop file: $ qdbus org.ayatana.bamf /org/ayatana/bamf/matcher \ > org.ayatana.bamf.matcher.RunningApplicationsDesktopFiles /usr/share/applications/compiz.desktop /usr/share/applications/firefox.desktop ...


4

I've found something in the GVFS man page that states that it's for browsing windows file shares. • gvfsd-smb-browse - browses Windows Shares Filesystem volumes GVFS is the gnome virtual filesystem: GIO provides a VFS API to GLib applications. It includes a 'local' implementation using POSIX. gvfs provides implementations that go beyond that and allow to ...


0

There are two very neat commands pgrep and pkill that allow entering search term or part of the command name , and it will either provide the PID(s) of the process or (in case of pkill) kill that process. $ pgrep -f firefox 23699 Running the same command with pkill and -f flag will close all ...


0

With pkill and sending signal 9, you can kill process by name: sudo pkill -9 myName


1

If myName is the name of the process/executable which you want to kill, you can use: pkill myName pkill by default sends the SIGTERM signal (signal 15). If you want the SIGKILL or signal 9, use: pkilll -9 myName If myName is not the process name or for example, is an argument to another (long) command, pkill (or pgrep) might not work as expected. So ...


0

You could do a simple for loop over all the PID's associated with the specific process name, like this: $ for i in $( ps ax | awk '/[m]yName/ {print $1}' ); do kill ${i}; done This will kill all processes that contain the word: myName.


1

With a command's name use: pkill -9 myscript If you are looking for a string in the command line: kill -9 $(ps ax | grep myName | fgrep -v grep | awk '{ print $1 }') I have to warn you: the above command can send a SIGKILL signal to more than one process.


0

A simple loop in a script: #! /bin/bash start=$SECONDS while (( SECONDS - start < 3600 )) do sleep 10m pgrep -f test &>- || exit done echo success SECONDS is a special variable in bash that contains the number of seconds since the script has started. pgrep test checks for a process named test. If it doesn't find one, we exit the script. ...


1

You can use a while loop; here i am using pgrep to check if the process is running: #!/bin/bash counter=0 while :; do [ "$counter" -eq 6 ] && break if pgrep <process_name> &>/dev/null; then echo "Success !!" (( counter += 1 )) sleep 10m else echo "Process not running..exiting !!" break ...


20

You can use the killall command to send a SIGSTOP signal to all processes matching a given name to freeze them and later send SIGCONT the same way to thaw them again. First find out the process name using pgrep -l SEARCH_PATTERN: $ pgrep -l chrom 13010 chromium-browse 13036 chromium-browse 13038 chromium-browse 13153 chromium-browse 13166 chromium-browse ...


7

To suspend, try: killall -SIGTSTP chromium-browser If this does not work, try the forceful version: killall -SIGSTOP chromium-browser. Either way, to continue use killall -SIGCONT chromium-browser. I tried with Firefox and it worked. Do note however, that if you click buttons in Chromium while it is suspended it will execute that stuff once you continue ...


2

You can try the following (in a Terminal): ps aux | grep gedit Then you'll see something like this: barend 7166 5.3 1.0 722620 39044 ? Sl 16:19 0:00 gedit Write down the number 7166 (or whatever number it is) and then do: kill -STOP 7166 That will suspend execution of the process. It won't immediately free the memory used by it, but ...


1

In Unix , there are two things files Process "files has places and processes have life" by Kaare Christian A running file that is executed as a program is termed as process (set of instructions). Processes have children, parents, and grandchildren (no, I am not joking :) ) To see all the current processes, press Ctrl+Alt+T and enter ps. For more ...


2

When you issue a command or execute a shell script in any Unix-like operating system, you start, or create, a process. In short, a process is an instance of a running program. Attributes of processes include a process-id (pid) and a parent process-id (ppid), and there are others. Processes are also associated with a terminal (tty) from which they were ...


0

The easiest way I've found is using the pidof command: renice <new niceness> -p $(pidof <process name>) found from: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/4614/renice-by-name For your situation, probably put that command into crontab -e (as root) with whatever period you want (say every 30 mins). It seems like you should find the root ...


0

First, get the PIDs of the processes: pgrep google-chrome To kill all the google-chrome processes with PIDs greater than say, 4500: kill -9 $(pgrep google-chrome | awk '$1>4500') Example output: ron@ron:~$ pgrep sleep 3956 4656 4978 4992 ron@ron:~$ kill -9 $(pgrep sleep | awk '$1>4500') [2] Killed sleep 1000 [3]- Killed ...



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