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The numbers you have pointed out are referred to as exit status value of a process. If a process terminates properly then the exit status will always be 0, if it does not terminate properly then the exit status will be some number other than 0. You can found the exit status of the last executed command by running the following in the terminal: echo $? ...


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Yes. It is possible to have multiple init processes. In the olden days before Upstart, there was just one init process (where PID = 1). Now, with Upstart, there's the original init process (where PID = 1). But, when a user logs in, a new init process is created for that user session. Thus, that is why you see the second init process (where PID != 1).


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nano is a small commandline text editor for Linux. Some possible explanations for the high memory consumption: The application has been running a very long time with a memory leak The application has a VERY VERY big file open It's a virus concealing itself as nano What you can do to further investigate ps -auxuf should give you a little bit more ...


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Nginx depends on worker processes being able to shutdown gracefully. Apparently it can start new requests with the newly applied configuration. But it does not continue already started requests. To quote from http://nginx.org/en/docs/beginners_guide.html: Once the master process receives the signal to reload configuration, it checks the syntax validity ...


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Or just from bash: MYPID=$(pidof target) ; zenity -- info --text "Process $MYPID waiting" & wait $MYPID ; killall zenity Note that wait requires the process to be a child of the current shell; you could use your original version instead.


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Using Zenity What can relatively easy be done is to: generate a Zenity message to mention your script is waiting for a pid to appear. The window will be automatically closed if the pid appears in the output of ps -p <pid>, ps -e or any other ps command, run by the script. Example Below is the procedure how it can be done. I am using python in ...


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Run gedit and paste this into the new text document: #!/bin/bash while true do docky done Then, save it as '[AnyNameHere].sh' (preferably in your Documents folder). After saving, open your file manager, locate the new file, and right click it. Select Proprieties, then go to the permissions tab. There should be a tickbox that says "Executable" or something ...


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One way would be to send the SIGSTOP signal to all of your brother's processes: sudo pkill -STOP -u brother To awaken the stopped processes, the SIGCONT signal is used: sudo pkill -CONT -u brother You can use an Upstart session job, one which would run when you logged in or out or locked or unlocked your screen. For example, create a .conf file in ...


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Check this Save and Restore Linux Processes with CRIU


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Check which application is taking higher resources. Find the pid of that application using the command pidof "application name" without the quotes. sudo kill -STOP "ID of the process" Then once you have completed your work use the below command to start that stopped process. sudo kill -CONT "PID that you have killed earlier" Give it a try!


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You can add an optional --sort= specifier e.g. ps -e --sort=args From man ps --sort spec Specify sorting order. Sorting syntax is [+|-]key[,[+|-]key[,...]]. Choose a multi-letter key from the STANDARD FORMAT SPECIFIERS section.


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$ lsof /dev/video0 Should tell you which processes are accessing the device, if any.



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