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0

if you simply want to check whether there is any under process then go to that directory and type ll -tr if you see .csv or .work etc at the end of the file then it means under process else not.


-1

if you want to check all processes then use 'top' if you want to know processes run by java then use ps -ef | grep java if other process then just use ps -ef | grep xyz or simply /etc/init.d xyz status if through any code like .sh then ./xyz.sh status


2

wineserver is a component of wine. It shouldn't be present in a default clean Ubuntu installation. Someone either manually installed it or it was installed as a dependency of another package. Please try the following: Where is wineserver? Use which to find out: $ which wineserver /usr/bin/wineserver winserver's full path is /usr/bin/wineserver. What ...


0

When you encounter there are stopped jobs error: typejobs--> you will see the jobs with stopped status and then type exit--> you can get out of the terminal


2

you can check diskIO and cpu usage of those processes. it wont give a definitive answer but it will show you if the process is busy. sudo iotop | grep [your pid here] top | grep [your pid here]


0

You can take a peak at the processes who list your shell's PID as parent. As you may or may not know , we can specify ps format SHELLPID=$$ ; ps -e -o cmd,pid,ppid | awk -v shell=$SHELLPID '$NF~shell' Here, we get the shell's PID from special variable $$ into SHELLPID , which then can be used by awk in pipe's subshell. Essentially we're just listing ...


2

If you started some process in terminal (eg. gedit) than the Process ID (PID) (of bash) and Parent Process ID (PPID) (of gedit) will be the same for this two processes will be the same. This can be seen in the output of ps -ef command. To make it more readable lets first "pipe" the output to grep to find the PID of all "bash" processes and than take only ...


-1

I was having a similar problem after I recently upgraded to Ubuntu 16.04. I found this post http://askubuntu.com/a/771889/538796 and Jonathan's purge and reinstall commands took care of it for me. Hope this helps. sudo apt-get purge runit sudo apt-get purge git-all sudo apt-get purge git sudo apt-get autoremove sudo apt update sudo apt install ...


0

/etc/init.d/mysql stop service mysql stop killall -KILL mysql mysqld_safe mysqld When you see the following information, you success mysql: no process found mysqld_safe: no process found mysqld: no process found I use this to solve the installation problem of MySQL 5.6 in Ubuntu 15.10 using this link. During this installation, I encounter the problem ...


0

If a normal kill does not work you might kill it with signal KILL kill -9 <PID> so in your case kill -9 4618 More on kill can be found in the related man page


1

This bug has been resolved: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/policykit-1-gnome/+bug/1512002 You can install the updated package (must enable 'proposed' repo) which modifies the policy: /usr/share/polkit-1/actions/org.freedesktop.accounts.policy - <allow_any>auth_self</allow_any> - <allow_inactive>auth_self</allow_inactive> ...


3

For viewing logs in real-time, use tail -f -n [number of lines] [file]. -f is for follow, which will pipe the appended log data to stdout (e.g. console window) as the data is written to the file -n is for number of lines to follow A good place to start would be /var/log/syslog. This is the default log file for many system events, services, and ...


2

All activity is pretty broad. To add to the existing answers: dmesg dumps the kernel log to the terminal. Man page. strace allows real-time tracing of all system calls from single a given process. Man page. Ubuntu page. perf "strace on steroids." Perf is a very powerful tool for tracing events at various different granularities across the system, ...


8

Many things you simply cannot spot, because they are handled inside the application or process without any communication to "the outer world". a random (totally incomplete) list of a few of the most important tools you could use however to monitor specific sections of what is going on: the top command: from man top: The top program provides a dynamic ...


6

Try history command, it displays the last $HISTSIZE (default 500) executed command in terminal. journalctl command displays log messages, if system uses systemd. ps -aux shows running processes, can be used with ps -aux|grep xxxx to select a specific process.


1

Then nethogs command line utility will show you the network usage of every process on your system. You can install it by using sudo apt-get install nethogs Then just type in "nethogs" into the terminal and as soon as the process starts to use your bandwidth it will be listed.


0

The 'ps' command only displays processes. htop by default shows each thread as a separate process. Which implies 'htop' will always show more items than 'ps'. We can show per-thread statistics with the 'ps' command as well. for ex: ps -Lf | grep xyz.sh Which one to use ? If you are looking for threads status of a single process - htop If you are ...


2

The way to do it with qdbus and org.ayatana.bamf interface. List of open applications by .desktop file: $ qdbus org.ayatana.bamf /org/ayatana/bamf/matcher \ > org.ayatana.bamf.matcher.RunningApplicationsDesktopFiles /usr/share/applications/compiz.desktop /usr/share/applications/firefox.desktop ...



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