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4

If you run a command from terminal then the command will always show up in the process table being a process. Your case is different as you have run a Desktop entry (declared in a .desktop file), whose name and the command it executes can be totally different. The .desktop files use an INI format to express metadata. Here is the Desktop entry for htop: [...


4

It does not require root permissions to lower the priority of a process $ sleep 100 & [1] 6965 $ renice 19 6965 6965 (process ID) old priority 0, new priority 19 Raising the priority does require root permission: $ renice -19 6965 renice: failed to set priority for 6965 (process ID): Permission denied $ sudo renice -19 6965 6965 (process ID) old ...


1

That is not a valid command so: no. ps -u $(whoami) would be a valid method but since $USER equals to the current user ps -u $USER is shorter and less consuming. You can also do top -U $USER for a real time method (it will refresh the processes) and ordered by %CPU. Or pstree $USER for a tree like view.


1

If you know the pid of a process, you can use this command to see who is the owner of the process: ps u pid_number



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