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17

You are looking for the pstree command. pstree by itself will list all the processes in a tree form (like lsblk does). You can use the -p flag to get the PIDs listed as well, and the -s to show parent process as well: $ pstree -p 602 udisksd(602)-+-{cleanup}(607) |-{gdbus}(605) |-{gmain}(603) `-{probing-thread}(606)


9

Another option is, to use System Monitor (comes pre-installed). In SM Menubar mark "Dependencies" option, under "View", to have a visual feedback, showing parent and children process(es) like show in the screenshot below. I prefer the CL (Command Line) myself and suggest, that those who use Linux, in this case Ubuntu on a daily basis, wisely invest their ...


7

If you just want to see the immediate children of a process whose PID is 123 you can use the ps command's --ppid option: ps --ppid 123 You can combine that with the pidof command to get the children of a process by name i.e. given a process called foo ps --ppid $(pidof foo)


3

I understand your question as willing to make an already running process Zombie. As per the definition of Zombie process, it is not an easy task to make a already running process a Zombie. A Zombie process is a process which is terminated but its parent things that it is yet running so its PID is yet present in the processes list, but actually the child ...


3

I'm not an expert, but reading the above answers it seemed to me that there is probably a more direct way to do this via the proc filesystem, e.g. for programmatic use in a script rather than human-readable display. And indeed there is: for a process with ID code $mypid, its child processes are listed in /proc/$mypid/task/$mypid/children e.g. $ cat ...


1

Neither: Since Linux 2.6.23 Con Kolivas's work, most significantly his implementation of "fair scheduling" named "Rotating Staircase Deadline", inspired Ingo Molnár to develop the Completely Fair Scheduler as a replacement for the earlier O(1) scheduler, crediting Kolivas in his announcement. The Completely Fair Scheduler (CFS) uses a ...


1

There are nicer ways for sure; a simple approach however would be starting your application from terminal. There you see the output even after it has crashed.



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