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62

Zombies are DEAD processes. They can not be 'kill' (You cannot kill the DEAD). All processes eventually die, and when they do they become zombies. They consume almost no resources, which is to be expected because they are dead! The reason for zombies is so the zombie's parent (process) can retrieve the zombie's exit status and resource usage statistics. ...


44

There is an even simpler solution than the one of qbi: killall let's you kill processes by name, and you can specify signals. killall -9 middleman See man killall for more information and extra options (there are quite a few). As the name suggests, this does send the signal to all processes named middleman. But that's not different from other ways (like ...


40

System Monitor shows you an overview of running applications (under the Processes tab) and allows you to end them by right-clicking on the name and selecting the respective context menu item. You can set up keyboard shortcuts in the Keyboard settings (Shortcuts tab), so you can bind Ctrl+Alt+Del to gnome-system-monitor, the command to start System Monitor. ...


32

Daemons - Daemon does not stand for Disk and Execution Monitor (http://www.takeourword.com/TOW146/page4.html). They are the processes which run in the background and are not interactive. They have no controlling terminal. They perform certain actions at predefined times or in response to certain events. In *NIX, the names of daemons end in d. Services - ...


31

When you call a exec family method it doesn't create a new process, instead exec replaces the current process memory and instruction set etc with the process you want to run. As an example, you want to run grep using exec. bash is a process (which has separate memory, address space). Now when you call exec(grep), exec will replace current process's memory, ...


25

I use Chromium not Chrome so they could be different, but try unchecking Background Apps: (*) Continue running background apps when Chromium is closed which is located at chrome://settings/advanced (or in settings:under the hood via the menus) down at the bottom of the page, as shown in this screenshot: Good luck!


25

I think you see killall in how-to's because by default it requires the precise process name, whereas pkill does basic pattern matching. Thus, killall is safer for users to blindly copy and paste. Pkill and killall both have distinguishing options. Killall has a flag to match by process age, pkill has a flag to only kill processes on a given tty. Etcetera ad ...


24

I don't thing zombie process is much of a headache. A zombie process does not take up any resources. It is just that it has it's entry in the process table. A Zombie process is not an orphan process, it does have a parent. kill, skill pkill will not work since the process is already killed, just that it's entry has not been removed. Zombie process can be ...


24

'nice' refers to the priority the process gets on your CPU. This is a number in the range of -20 (highest priority) to 19 (lowest). You'll probably find that most applications you're running are at nice '0', which means that they are running with normal priority and none will get preferential treatment by the scheduler over another. If you're running an ...


24

Each process in linux has a special directory /proc/{pid}/fd/. 0 is stdin, 1 is stdout and 2 is stderr. So, assuming you are only interested in diagnostic output you can determine the process pid, and then in the terminal do: to see stdout: cat /proc/{pid of process}/fd/1 to see stderr: cat /proc/{pid of process}/fd/2


23

The waiting channel is the place in the Kernel where the task is currently waiting. A task has to wait for a Resource, which can be data or processing time. These two include network sockets, hardware, files, and so on; since most of them are just files, in Unix-like systems. 0: The process isn't waiting poll_schedule_timeout poll() is a system call1 used ...


23

Your computer communicates with the devices attached to it through IRQs (interrupt requests). When an interrupt comes from a device, the operating system pauses what it was doing and starts addressing that interrupt. In some situations IRQs come very very fast one after the other and the operating system cannot finish servicing one before another one ...


23

You can use your shell to do this task for you: kill -9 $(pidof middleman) The shell executes the command pidof middleman first. The output of pidof(8) is the process id. So the shell substitutes the pidof-command with the process id and executes kill -9 18845 (or whatever the correct process id is).


22

They're not processes, they're threads under one process. By default htop shows threads and in this case, is very misleading. You can alter this by going into Setup (F2), Display options and checking Hide userland threads. Press F10 when you're done.


22

To kill all the processes that you have the permission to kill, simply run the command kill -15 -1 or kill -9 -1 depending on the desired behavior (use man kill for details) To kill a specific process, say, firefox, simply run pkill firefox or killall firefox depending on the behavior you want: What's the difference between 'killall' and ...


20

Gnome uses a Session Manager (gnome-session) to keep track of what it needs to do. It is responsible for bringing up the whole session, all subprocesses, restoring state and saving it when you log out. GNOME provides tools to allow your application to run smoothly from session to session. Users can log out with running applications and have those ...


19

A bash script to do something like that would look something like this: #!/bin/bash # Check if gedit is running if ps aux | grep "[g]edit" > /dev/null then echo "Running" else echo "Stopped" fi This script is just checking to see if the program "gedit" is running. The square brackets are useful to avoid the output of the grep command. Without ...


18

There are two primary ways to identify hung processes. One is via the System Monitor GUI and the other is via top in command-line. System Monitor This can be found in System > Administration You can also create a keyboard shortcut for this in this article. Once the GUI launches you can select the Processes tab which will list all the running processes. ...


14

To stay in the spirit of magical shortcuts, here are some : ctrl+alt+backspace combination (disabled on default on 11.10) that can restart the GUI. ctrl+alt+F2 to F6, that will display a console from which you could login and then eventually kill the stucked application. Once you killed it you can return to the GUI by pressing alt-f7. Killing an ...


14

Ubuntu uses Apparmor, a SELinux alternative. Wikipedia gives some tips on why some people consider AppArmor is better than SELinux: AppArmor is offered in part as an alternative to SELinux, which critics consider difficult for administrators to set up and maintain. Unlike SELinux, which is based on applying labels to files, AppArmor works with file ...


13

The other answers are entirely correct, but I might as well add a third option so all are documented here. You can also use: pkill -9 middleman See man pkill for more information and extra options. It doesn't really matter which of these methods you use. They will all work. But knowing the options if useful if you want to modify the behaviour in some ...


13

From your output we see a "defunct", which means the process has either completed its task or has been corrupted or killed, but its child processes are still running or these parent process is monitoring its child process. To kill this kind of process kill -9 PID don't work, you can try to kill with this command but it will show this again and again. ...


13

Per your request on the other question, here is my answer again: I'm sure there is a cleaner way of doing it, but for your second question you can try this: xprop _NET_WM_PID | sed 's/_NET_WM_PID(CARDINAL) = //' | ps `cat` This will make your cursor a cross with which you can click on an open window. It will report the PID and command in the ...


12

GeoClue source: wikipedia.org GeoClue is a software framework which can be used to enable geospatial awareness in applications. GeoClue uses the D-Bus inter-process communication mechanism to provide location information1, but there is also a Qt Mobility API in the works2. Through this it aims to simplify development of location aware applications and ...


11

As others have mentioned, gnome-session respawns the nautilus process automatically. It also does so for gnome-panel and gnome-wm (which in turn starts the window manager configured by the user, usually compiz or metacity). This behavior is customizable through the desktop > gnome > session > required_components gconf keys. Editing these value ...


11

You can use lsof | grep /absolute/path/to/file.txt to see if a file is open. If the file is open, this command will return status 0, otherwise it will return 256 (1). Be aware that this command will take a second since there are, normally, a lot of files open at any time. You can also use lsof -c gedit, for example, to see which file gedit has opened. ...


11

The waiting channel value is the name of the kernel function in which the process is currently blocked. The name is usually related to a system call, which will have a manual page. futex_wait_queue_me is related to futex. It refers to a type of mutex lock (fast userspace mutual exclusion) that is used to schedule many processes work on one processor. ...


10

Try to switch to a different workspace Ctrl+Alt+one of you arrow keys, unless your system is completely frozen it should be able to switch workspaces In the new workspace look for System Monitor in the dash, it is like Windows Taskmanager. you should then be able to "kill" the process by right clicking on it. If this doesn't work you can restart your ...


10

This are kernel processes. kswapd is basically responsible for the swap space management. If it gets busy that's usually a sign that you are low on RAM. Quite likely it causes the HD activity, which in turn keeps kworker and ksoftirqd busy. See Kworker, what is it and why is it hogging so much CPU? and Why is ksoftirqd/0 process using all my cpu? for an ...


10

Actually... CTRL+Z will suspend the process. CTRL+c will kill the process. Note that suspending a process will send it to the background until you call it again. Since it is suspended you can run another program. It will "look" like is gone but is not. It will actually tell you the Process ID that has been assigned to it before going to the background. ...



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