Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

56

You are an administrator, but not root. The root user can do anything. Administrators can perform actions as root, but ordinarily what administrators do is not done by root. That way, you have full control over your own system, but only when you choose to use it. Ubuntu asks for your password when you try to do stuff as root, to make sure it's really you. ...


48

You need to add the user to the sudo group (which is the "administrators" group in Ubuntu). If you have already created the user, you can add the user to the sudo group by running the following command in a Terminal. sudo usermod -a -G sudo hduser


33

The shutdown on the cog-wheel checks if you are allowed to shutdown the machine. This is done via PolicyKit. In case of shutdown this statement in the file /usr/share/polkit-1/actions/org.freedesktop.consolekit.policy is checked: <action id="org.freedesktop.consolekit.system.stop"> <description>Stop the system</description> ...


21

Normally I'd include instructions in an answer, but this is such a bad idea I'll point you to a couple places to read up on how to do this. You can take it from there. Note that when you break your system you can post here again for help, but people will laugh and shake their heads and make reference to pebkac errors, etc. First, the Ubuntu help page on ...


20

Ubuntu is a distribution of the GNU/Linux Operationg System which in turn belongs to the Unix system family - a common architecture for a number of modern Operating Systems. Traditionally Unix used to run on mainframe computers. Central computing facilities which serve dozends or hundreds of users via remote terminals. Since all users relied on the ...


14

Haven't tried it but this should create a new user and add them to the sudo group, which if your /etc/sudoers is as default, should mean they're allowed to use sudo with their password (just like the standard first user): sudo adduser --group sudo newusername If you've already created the user, you can just run: sudo adduser existing_user sudo man ...


10

Because Linux is commonly used as a server or similar, and SSHing into a linux box, even a normal Ubuntu laptop, is quite common. Thing is, you may not want people with SSH access to be able to shut it down, especially when there may be other remotely logged in users using it. Someone with access to the GUI — well, he can shut it down on his own ...


10

It's improper to say that: "It seems that on Ubuntu, calls to sudo from the GUI are somehow being intercepted by pkexec". pkexec doesn't have to many things in common with sudo. In contrast with sudo, pkexec does not grant root permission to an entire process, but rather allows a finer level of control of centralized system policy. Now, if you want to run a ...


8

The reason you don't need to be root to initiate a shutdown from the GUI is largely a matter of convenience for the typical desktop user. The system knows that you're the user logged in on the console, so if you shut down the computer by mistake, you can presumably turn it back on. For a user in the shell, you might very well be logged in remotely, so the ...


8

The user in question has sudo privileges because it is in the admin group. As wojox commented, you could use visudo and remove sudo privileges from the admin group, but that would remove sudo capabilities from all members of the admin group not just the one user. Alternatively, you can remove the user from the admin group. If screen oriented vi is ...


8

Following up on the comments above: Because the admin group doesn't exist on your system we are assuming you are running 12.04. To be able to administer your system with 12.04 you need your user-id to be in the sudo group. I was able to add a user-id to the sudo group as follows. Reboot using grub and select an entry for recovery mode. Select the "root" ...


7

Search for user accounts in System settings , there you will get window like this Now select the account you want to change to Standard One, Unlock it from the Upper right button which will ask for password. Now selecting the Account type Button ( refer image) , you will get option as Standard. It will again ask for password . Now it is done. For Doing ...


6

Yes, copied from: pbuilder. It is possible to use user-mode-linux by invoking pbuilder-user-mode-linux instead of pbuilder. pbuilder-user-mode-linux doesn't require root privileges, and it uses the copy-on-write (COW) disk access method of User-mode-linux which typically makes it much faster than the traditional pbuilder. User-mode-linux is a somewhat less ...


6

I solved this problem by changing the default policy. There are three ways to achieve this: By giving privilege to a group First create a group mounter by using this command: sudo addgroup mounter Then add the non-admin users to this group. For examle, I'm adding non-admin user normal to this group. sudo adduser normal mounter Then open the policy ...


6

You can't! If you wish to give root access to an user, nothing can stop him from do anything he want with the system. Root privileges means no restrictions. So, better, give to an user only the permissions he needs.


5

Ahmm.. the problem is that the standard shell of those users is normally set to /bin/false and for security reasons you should not change this. But you can still run for example: sudo -u www-data /bin/sh


5

Use gksudo -u root <program_name> or gksudo -k -u root <program_name> to run <program_name> as the root user. See the manpage for the gksudo command for more information.


5

Instead you can try, sudo adduser hduser sudo Because In some linux distributions, there is no group called admin in unix. You need to add the user only to the group sudo.


4

Short answer Simply add your commands at the end of the file /etc/rc.local (but before the exit 0 line!) Long answer Of course there's also the Debian way of doing this - writing a script. Put it in the /etc/init.d/ directory. Lets say you called it FOO. You then run % update-rc.d FOO defaults. You also have to make the file you created, FOO, executable, ...


4

sudo -i runs the shell specified by the password database entry of the target user, which is /bin/false for your system user. Use sudo -u some-daemon-user bash or sudo -u some-daemon-user -H bash if you want to set the $HOME environment variable set for the target user.


4

I want to keep browsing is incompatible with disable uploading files to internet Here is why: Any website you browse involves two-way traffic: your computer sends data to the website, and the website sends data back to your computer. A user who is "just browsing" a website could type in anything they want. they could, if they wanted, run base64 ...


3

I just copied the files '/etc/pam.conf' and '/etc/security/pam_env.conf' and the folder 'pam.d' from the Ubuntu Installation Disk.


3

No such thing as a dumb question ;) I hope this clarifies things a bit: In Ubuntu, two different types of user accounts may be made: standard accounts and administrator accounts. The difference between the two: a standard account is not allowed to make any important changes to your system by attaining root access, whereas an administrator account may use ...


3

The account created during installation is an administrator account. In Ubuntu, root account has no password and as a consequence, you can not login as the root user. There are ways to circumvent this, but this is the default setting. An Administrator account in Ubuntu means that the user is added to the group sudo, which makes the account eligible to gain ...


3

You updated your cached sudo credentials (no real effect), switched the user to yourself (again no effect), then started an X session on tty8, which had an effect :). Use Ctrl+Alt+F8 (not F7) to switch to the graphical display if you want to see it. Starting the second X session caused a problem with your .Xauthority file. You can fix the problem by ...


3

If you follow this guide: http://www.srcds.com/db/engine.php?id=1098643920 This guide should guide you through the installation part. You shouldn't have to install srcds as root. (The chmod +x hldsupdatetool.bin is the important part)


3

The secret to this is the command gksudo or gksu gksu is a frontend to su and gksudo is a frontend to sudo. Their primary purpose is to run graphical commands that need root without the need to run an X terminal emulator and using su directly. You only need to use gksudo when editing system files: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo ...


3

lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 6 Mar 10 15:57 bzcmp -> bzdiff lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 6 Mar 10 15:57 bzegrep -> bzgrep lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 6 Mar 10 15:57 bzfgrep -> bzgrep lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 6 Mar 10 15:57 bzless -> bzmore -rwsr-xr-x 1 root root 26252 Mar 2 16:33 fusermount lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 8 Mar 10 15:57 lessfile -> ...


3

I might be wrong on this but it is my understanding that if you give a utility root privileges and it gets compromised by malicious code, then the malicious code also gets root privileges. It is my understanding that for this reason Ubuntu handles security differently from other distributions. It does not install a root user. It installs a user that gets ...


3

I'm not sure how possible your request is given the guest session is recreated every time as a "default new user" I also don’t know a method of turning this behaviour off (hopefully someone else will come along and answer that piece) A plausible workaround though, is to remove the Guest account and set up a new user account that you will have more control ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible