Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

53

I personally don't use Unity but if you're looking for a way to hide traces of certain, erm, "activities", you could create another user account that was dedicated to that activity which would have its own Unity cache and settings, so you could go wild and nobody ever need know. So let's say you have a passion for painting Warhammer 40,000 characters. ...


25

They are proxying through productsearch.ubuntu.com with HTTPS encryption (though there's still a a heated bug discussion over whether the search should be included at all). Unfortunately, while no personally identifying information is sent to Amazon, the privacy policy for Ubuntu sharing information about proxied searches is still unclear. Also, there are ...


17

This isn't the exact solution you want, but I couldn't find another way to do it more in line with the original question. Chrome The solution is to use incognito mode. To get to incognito mode, use the following keyboard shortcut: Ctrl+Shift+N Firefox The solution is to use private browsing. To start private browsing, use the following keyboard ...


14

GeoClue source: wikipedia.org GeoClue is a software framework which can be used to enable geospatial awareness in applications. GeoClue uses the D-Bus inter-process communication mechanism to provide location information1, but there is also a Qt Mobility API in the works2. Through this it aims to simplify development of location aware applications and ...


12

Another way is to go to "System Settings" > "Privacy" and clean what you need (you can also turn off the "Record Activity"):


11

A Public folder exists in your Home directory (/home/user) for sharing files with other users. If an other user wants to get access to this Public folder, the execute bit for the world should be set on the Home directory. If you do not need to allow others to access your home folder (other humans or users like www-data for a webserver), you'll be fine with ...


10

Since any user needs to have a password entry in /etc/passwd the answer is No. Anyone with root access can see the contents of the file and therefore know about your user. Even if you use directory services such as ldap, the user has to be registered somewhere. When it comes to hiding from other desktop users, you can do some things to make it harder. ...


10

The GUI tools ignore accounts with uid < 1000, which are reserved for system accounts. Give the account an unused uid in that range and it won't show up in the gui tools. Short of patching in a backdoor into the login program though, you can't hide it from the command line tools or direct inspection of /etc/passwd.


9

What does this mean exactly? Your activities are recorded in order to better understand how you are using your system. Using this extensive knowledge, the performance of the system can be improved considerably. For example, knowing which application you launcher when you start your computer would help the system to pre-launch the application in the ...


9

I do not believe Amazon will see every query in its original state since these queries are sent to productsearch.ubuntu.com and then continue on so your ip address is not reaching Amazon's API. However the other concern is how does Canonical handle these queries since they get them in the original form and have no issued a privacy policy explaining whether ...


9

Install exiftool: sudo apt-get install libimage-exiftool-perl To read photo metadata: exiftool /tmp/my_photo.jpg To erase photo metadata: exiftool -all= /tmp/my_photo.jpg Before: ExifTool Version Number : 8.60 File Name : my_photo.jpg Directory : /tmp File Size : 3.0 MB File ...


8

Uh, those are not Amazon results but Ubuntu Software Centre results. They are not live online results - but use data obtained by updating the apt database (which you would need to do for installing software anyway). No third party is involved. To disable it, see How to remove the Ubuntu Software Center Suggestions from the Dash.


7

According to an Ubuntuforms.org staff member, it is to make it easier to share files between new users. You can change the permission to either 700 or 750 if you don't want the files readable and executable by others. Command is: chmod 750 $HOME Note: Ubuntu default is 755


6

We don't generally track user behaviour. We do have some statistical metrics to understand how people use our software, like how many shares do people create a day, how many public files, how much space do people use on average, etc. This is to help us understand how people use our product and how to improve it. We don't track individual users at all, we ...


6

Is it used for tracking? No; GeoClue itself does not contact external services for the reason of providing your location, but rather only provides an API for ubuntu applications to use to find out where you are. If you are in doubt that GeoClue is providing location data to a third party for the purpose of surveillance, you can examine the source code ...


6

Almost all of the logs are stored in /var/log. Example: /var/log/syslog, /var/log/dmesg, etc.. You could use the Log File Viewer to view them nicely if you want to.


5

You can clear Alt+F2 history in dconf editor. Install dconf editor: Hit Alt+Ctrl+T and run the following command: sudo apt-get install dconf-tools Or search for "dconf-tools" in Software Center and install it from there. Clearing History: Once installed, Hit super key (windows key) to open Unity dash and search for "dconf editor" and open it. Navigate ...


5

Dash search terms are not sent to Amazon directly. They're sent to Canonical, which then sends them to Amazon. That means Amazon doesn't get your IP. However, as of the current implementation, thumbnail requests are directly sent to Amazon. So Amazon does get your IP in the end. More details: ...


5

You can have shell users without a home directory: useradd --no-create-home new_username But this probably won't cut it if you need to be able to log in with this user. As Carsten says, there's always going to be a trail back to the user at some point because the system needs to authenticate them. If you're just trying to hide somebody from the login ...


5

From Privacy setting you can turn off include online result. If you want to remove lens type:sudo apt-get purge unity-lens-shopping


4

Personally, I think people generally over-rate the concern for preserving "private" data when it comes to reporting crash data and such. But, there is a good reason for reviewing the data that you send to application developers. It really would depend on who you are submitting these logs to and for what purpose. Generally, as a first pass, personally, I ...


4

Omitting the MAC address improves your privacy, but it doesn't "make you anonymous". Every (IPv4 or IPv6) network still has a unique prefix, otherwise you wouldn't be able to receive any packets. In any case, this site shows how to enable the randomized suffix: http://otrs.menandmice.com/otrs/public.pl?Action=PublicFAQ&ItemID=91


4

You can read the User Management section of the Ubuntu Server Guide of 12.04 which covers the necessary details: https://help.ubuntu.com/12.04/serverguide/C/user-management.html The User Profile Security paragraph will probably answer your questions - officially ;-)


4

As noted, Facebook supports this already. Go to account settings and scroll down to account security:


4

It all depends on what you mean by "fingerprint". There's the fingerprint of the Internet services your machine provides (which port, which software, which version, if available), if it's connected to the Internet (remember, if you're connected to the Internet, the Internet is connected to you). You can minimize the size of this fingerprint by being ...


4

The logs are stored in ~/.local/share/zeitgeist/activity.sqlite. They are stored in an SQLite database, so you will need an SQLite database browser to view them.


4

Yes, Zeitgeist stores its data in sqlite. I'm using Ubuntu 12.04 (Precise Pangolin) and my zeitgeist usage data is in ~/.local/share/zeitgeist In order to access the raw logs, you'll need to know some SQL, which I'll leave up to you. However, if you have not installed sqlite3 , the command line interface for SQLite Version 3, then do so sudo apt-get ...


4

The short answer is 'no'. When I wrote ecryptfs-setup-private, I chose a set of defaults for eCryptfs that I considered sensible, secure and supportable for millions of Ubuntu users who wouldn't care much about tunables over the long haul. This limited the number of configuration combinations we had to test and support. As you've noted, eCryptfs is very ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible