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11

Open a terminal and enter the following: wget -q -O - https://dl-ssl.google.com/linux/linux_signing_key.pub | sudo apt-key add - That will import Google's updated GPG Key. You should be able to update the system without any errors. Source: Google Linux Repositories


6

This will work better than these solutions: sudo apt-key list You will see this on this list: pub 1024D/7FAC5991 2007-03-08 uid Google, Inc. Linux Package Signing Key <linux-packages-keymaster@google.com> sub 2048g/C07CB649 2007-03-08 You will do now: sudo apt-key del 7FAC5991 Then you will do these commands: sudo -i ...


4

After unpacking the *.debian.tar.gz file, you can use the dch commands to create new changelog entries. For example, dch -i would (probably) bump up the version to 1.67-1~precise~ppa2. You can instead use dch -v "1.68-1~precise~ppa1" to specify the new version. Note that dch can also take in another argument that represents the message for that changelog ...


3

The 'partners' are companies that provide software that is approved by Canonical but for which the Ubuntu community is not providing updates. That's the responsibility of the partners themselves. The community however provides the install packages (builds the packages). For instance Adobe used to be a partner. Independent are essentially providers that are ...


2

Generally, <name>_<version>.orig.tar.xz or <name>_<version>.orig.tar.gz is the source archive, as released by the project. It's simply renamed to fit the vagaries of the Debian packaging system. Usually, for packaging purposes, you need to unpack <name>_<version>.orig.tar.xz in the current folder and then place the ...


1

PPAs and other third-party repositories are disabled during a release upgrade. You have to manually enable them post-upgrade. The packages are upgraded if a newer version exists, or left alone if there's no corresponding package in the official repositories. You can visit the PPA page and check if it supports the newer release. In the Overview of ...


1

Ubuntu 15.04 is still in development and hasn't been released yet. Because of this, not too many PPAs will have software available for Vivid. In addition, support for this release (while its still in development) will be limited/not available. If you're a new Ubuntu user, I recommend that you instead reinstall either 14.04 LTS (Trusty) or 14.10 (Utopic). As ...


1

wget -q -O - https://dl-ssl.google.com/linux/linux_signing_key.pub | sudo apt-key remove - apt-get update && apt-get upgrade


1

Part of the problem is that it's now expected that the debian/rules file either uses the newer dh_* target names (which this doesn't) or that there are build-arch and build-indep target names. If you look in Ubuntu's debian/rules, you'll see that for Trusty, they've make a build-arch target that calls build-stamp, and made build depend on build-arch. This ...


1

No, this is not possible. You can theoretically build on utopic, and then manually sync only the binary packages to the older releases, but you cannot configure Launchpad to do so automatically. You could also just backport the newer dependencies to the older versions of Ubuntu (trusty and precise) so that you can build the source on all of them, which ...


1

The canonical way to install seems to be ubuntu-make https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-make


1

copy-package is good for this, but the correct modern invocation would be: ./copy-package --from=~myname/ubuntu/myppa --from-suite=trusty --to=~myname/ubuntu/myppa --to-suite=utopic -b -y packagename (As saiarcot895 correctly noted, you needed to separate --ppa and --ppa-name, but this was always very confusing which was among the reasons we added the ...


1

The PPA should be ppa:cloud-installer/stable



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