New answers tagged

1

write the mount (/etc/fstab in this case) with noperm parameter to instruct local client ignore permission checks. It look like this (works for me,o nce i had ignored local permission rights) //remote-ip/share /local-path/dir/ cifs credentials=/your-credential-file,iocharset=utf8,uid=local-user-uid,gid=local-group-id,**noperm** 0 0


0

You can add your user account to a group with the following command: sudo usermod -a -G <group> <username> Do take care not to forget the -a (append) switch this tells usermod to add the group to the groups your user is already in otherwise it would replace all your existing groups with this one. Note that the groups are read at user login ...


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By default the umask for users creates files with 644 permissions or rw-r--r-- which allows all users to read but only the own to write, default permissions for directory creation is 755 which is rwxr-xr-x for a directory the execute bit (x) is interpreted differently and represents permission to list the contents of said directory. Thus you could do what ...


1

Iso's only do mount read-only. It's just the fact. I believe the reason is that ISO's have a specific structure that would have to be remade every time you unmounted the ISO which would take a ridiculous amount of processing power for limited functionality advantage.


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I had the same issue as well. I fixed it by doing the following: 1) Run virt-manager with sudo sudo virt-manager 2) Attempt to create your VM. When the error dialog appears, click Yes to correct the error. 3) When you get to the next step, cancel the creation process and close virt-manager. 4) Now relaunch virt-manager without sudo and attempt to ...


0

Do not run as root While you could simply activate the password for the root user (with passwd), do not do that. It's a very bad practice from a security point of view. Instead, you should handle permissions properly. Run a file manager as root You can start Nautilus with sudo privileges in the usual way: sudo nautilus Then you can copy the files that ...


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I have figured it out finally. The directory ~/.local/share/webbrowser-app has been owned by root, not by me. Solution was then as simple as using chmod.


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I can't specifically answer the question of why your code is not working. Below is the line in my fstab file, which mounts a shared drive when the computer boots. Modify for your situation and see if it works. #Mount Western Digital Passport Drive On Router - Not part of Logical Volume Management (LVM) //rt-n56u/sda1 /media/My_Passport cifs ...


0

Reboot. At the Grub menu, select "Advanced options". Select Ubuntu with the latest kernel version that says (Recovery mode) next to it. At the recovery menu, select "root Drop to root shell prompt" Once at the prompt type this: pam_tally2 --user=yourusername --reset (Obviously put your actual username here, which is case-sensitive) Then type ...


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The intention of the code is not really clear. The sed command is supposed to remove all "sudo" out of ..... yeah, what? Maybe if of the osync.sh? The -i option of sed is replacing "in place" which means that a file has to be provided and that's not happening here. Commenting the sed command with a leading "#" will "solve" the problem. Original reply: ...


0

Try this: chmod g+s /srv/folder This will sticky the group permission of any new files to that of the parent - if I understand correctly what you want to do.


3

After some private chat and debugging with the author - It would seem that you have your USB drive mounted with the noexec flag - this is preventing you from executing anything off of the drive, even if you have the permission explicitly set. To fix this, simply remount the usb drive with the exec flag. sudo mount -o remount,exec /home/myName/newMount ...


0

You have to make the command recursive to apply to the contents of the directory chmod -R 777 /srv/folder


0

It is not very clear what you are trying. I am guessing that your drive is getting mounted automatically but when you are trying to compile a file on your flash drive you get permission denied. Seems like you may have copied files with root privileges. You might want to try sudo chmod -R a+r /path/to/folder/, if you also want to store files on the device, ...


1

Read this article if you are unfamiliar with mounting filesytems in linux. In Linux, if you, or any other program (CodeBlocks in this case) has to run a file, the file should have executable permissions. These functionalities are not supported by the fat32 filesystem. Normally if it was a filesystem that supports this feature, you could have give the file ...


1

An alternative to giving everyone write access to the /root directory is to use acls to give the jenkins user access to the /root directory. ~# setfacl -m "u:jenkins:rwx" /root Most Ubuntu installs already have Access Control Lists enabled, but you might have to first install the acl package. Additionally, you can and the R flag to make the action ...


2

Some groups allow access to files or directories, for example: the www-data allow the access to web files or the adm group to read files in /var/log. The video group allows access to the video hardware. This is the trivial use. So, the dialout group allows access to the serial ports via files in /dev: sinscary@avenger:~$ find /dev -group dialout -exec ls ...


0

Had to format the card to ext and chmod to 777. Fstab did fix the other issue however.


2

There seems to have been a similar question at here. The two solutions they suggest: Change the owner of the file Run graphical applications as root using gksu / gksudo, or using kdesu in Kubuntu (as opposed to sudo) Extra: why you should not run GUI applications with sudo


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B/ try changing ownership to user running php A/ add sdcard to /etc/fstab https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Fstab


0

Don't mark all your files as executable as some answers suggest. Use 755 for directories and 644 for files. This will set the x bit for directories in order to list their contents but not for files. find /path/to/drive -type d -exec chmod 755 {} \; find /path/to/drive -type f -exec chmod 644 {} \; Link to the original answer on StackOverflow: How to set ...


0

If indeed mycontainer is unprivileged, then its owner might not have access to the path /pool/mydataset. Users in unprivileged containers have their uid offset on the host by the container-owner uid, so user1 inside the container isn't the same as user1 on the host. You can check what user on the host owns the container with sudo ls -l /pool/lxc | grep ...


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The first file: -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 1502 May 14 23:06 beamingweb.css This file root root is owned by the user root which as you can see is specified by being in the file owner column of the listing. The second reference to root is in the 4th column of the listing. That is the column that is showing the group owner of the file. The group owner is ...


1

In Linux and Unix, everything is a file. Directories are files, files are files and devices are files. Devices are usually referred to as a node; however, they are still files. All of the files on a system have permissions that allow or prevent others from viewing, modifying or executing. In first one -rw-r--r-- the permissions are as follows for user, ...


0

I believe you have to remount the partition/disk in read/write mode. I had same problems with one of newly created partitions. Try sudo mount -o remount,rw /PartitionID /MountPoint Enter the right PartitionID and MountPoint.


0

Thank you Andrew, I see that I do not have Administrator privileges, and below is the Help - System Information output from the pastebin. BleachBit version 1.10 GTK version 2.24.30 local_cleaners_dir = /home/leah/.config/bleachbit/cleaners locale_dir = /usr/share/locale/ options_dir = /home/leah/.config/bleachbit personal_cleaners_dir = ...


1

I think you have the wrong security type for the server , error 13 means the server isn't letting you in. You will need to select the right security mode in your mount command add a sec option via -o as follows: sec= Security mode. Allowed values are: · none - attempt to connection as a null user (no name) · krb5 - Use Kerberos version 5 ...


0

You need to tell the Minecraft server to actually save the world state before you shut the machine hosting it down. The Minecraft console command for this is save-all.


1

I solved this way: 1) Uninstall Transmission. All of it. Every package. sudo apt-get autoremove transmission-common 2) Delete every transmission* package in /var/cache/apt/archives sudo rm /var/cache/apt/archives/transmission* 3) Check if your package manager is working properly sudo apt-get upgrade && sudo apt-get update 4) Install ...


0

Try to add the "-v" option to get verbose output: sudo mount -v -t cifs //fileshare1/docs1/user/My\ Documents/shared/Francesco/ /home/frank/mnt_folder -o username=my_user,password=my_pass,domain=my_domain,gid=1000,uid=1000 Test with these options to the mount command "iocharset=utf8,rw,file_mode=0777,dir_mode=0777" : sudo mount -v -t cifs ...


0

You will have to do a new clean install, sorry.


2

Alright, I haven't tested this (so use at your own risk), but it still might work. I Will test this in a virtual machine when I get the chance to: First, in a still working system, I did the following to get all file permissions in a list, skipping the /home/ directory: sudo find / -not -path /home -printf "%m:%p\0" > /tmp/fileper.log This will print ...


0

I believe the command you are looking for to find all folders that belong to a specific user would be: sudo find / -type d -uid $(id -u <username>) 2>/dev/null > filename.txt Let's break down that command. sudo means to run the command as an elevated user. find is the actual command we are running, and of course, we are looking for ...


1

I found the solution. We needed to set the login shell and path to the sudoers entry for the service user's home like so: %domain.local\\service ALL=(service) NOPASSWD:/bin/bash, /opt/service/* Now we are able to enter the following to become the service user: $ sudo -i -u service $ whoami service $ pwd /opt/service


0

The problem looks like you haven't mounted any partition onto the /mnt, and are trying to pacstrap into the installation media itself. Re-check if you have not missed mounting a partition onto /mnt # mount /dev/sdxY /mnt Then install the base packages, generate fstab, and then chroot to it.


0

I would try using rsync to stay on the sage side: rsync -rlvzu --owner=<new-username> --chmod=a+rwx,g+rwx,o-wx /source/ /destination/ where -r for recursive -l for links -v for verbose -z for compression -u: updates the files instead of overwriting them (saving time) --chmod=a+rwx,g+rwx,o-wx: updates the permissions


2

After you created your user, before you log out of your old user make sure he is in the right groups: sudo adduser --home /home/<new-username> <new-username> sudo usermod -aG adm,cdrom,sudo,dip,plugdev,lpadmin,sambashare <new-username> Then : mv -v ~/* /home/<new-username>/ chown -R <new-username>:<new-username> ...


0

I finally figured out that it was my service provider's problem. For some reason the network at my institute was blocking this single file. So I installed r-base from terminal at another network (from another place) and it worked flawlessly!


0

An official article explains a few solutions to the problem, it is a likely issue for a new user to the repository that the public key is not attached to you account.


0

To expand on what @Zarco said, you can use sudo mysql to operate as root temporarily if you have sudo access on the machine. It looks like the standard is to use the plugin field now to do unix_socket authentication on MySQL.


0

Can you provide ls -la /var/www/folder1 and your cat vsftpd.conf? And, may be, you can use this: user_config_dir This powerful option allows the override of any config option specified in the manual page, on a per-user basis. Usage is simple, and is best illustrated with an example: If you set user_config_dir to be /etc/vsftpd_user_conf and then log on ...


0

Auto-mounting from terminal with sudo mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sdb1 /media/Elements mounts as root. Since ntfs does not have explicit permission management on a file-system basis, there's no point in using chown, chmod or chgrp. To mount it so it is user accessible from terminal, you need to use the user mount option, like this: sudo mount -t ntfs-3g -o user ...


0

Ok, I got it. All of the above did not work but I noticed that /media/username was also out of bounds, which was really weird as as was logged in as username. I guess it all has to do with changing the UID a while back. Anyhow, deleting /media/username let it be recreated automatically upon the next plug-in with the right permissions.


0

Try this: Unplugg the usb Open a terminal:Press Ctrl+Alt+T Run it: exec sudo -i mkdir /media/Elements chown -R -v sarah:sarah /media/Elements chmod -Rf 777 /media/Elements


0

Not sure if it will work because I can't test it myself but here is what I would try. First make sure that the USB is not plugged in and mounted. Check /media/Elements and see if it exists. If it does I would delete it then insert the USB again and see whats in the /media/ folder. If Elements isn't in there and some other folder is .. then the Label on ...


2

you need to add user option to your fstab (/etc/fstab) like this /dev/sdc1 /media/sdc1 vfat uid=1000,noauto,user 0 0 /dev/sdd1 /media/sdd1 vfat uid=1000,noauto,user 0 0 /dev/sdb1 /media/sdb1 vfat uid=1000,noauto,user 0 0 Normally, only the superuser can mount filesystems. However, when fstab ...


0

You can install for the specific user either or try the below. You might need to change your /etc/gemrc or /root/.gemrc. The default is set to: gem: --user-install Or you can use gem install --no-user-install rails Via: http://superuser.com/questions/475977/how-install-gem-rails-for-all-users-in-arch-linux


2

Why don't you run script with sudo like this: sudo bash /path/to/script.sh Where script.sh has following content with no sudo: #!/bin/bash echo "Updating repository ..."; git pull; echo "Installing composer dependencies from lockfile ..."; composer install; echo "Changing owner to www-data:www-data ..."; chown -R www-data:www-data .; echo "Deployment ...


0

I don't really know what's the reason, however there's solution: if [[ $(id -u $(whoami)) != 0 ]] then sudo bash $( cd $(dirname $0) ; pwd -P ) # taken from http://stackoverflow.com/a/4774063/2797066 else #rest of script fi


3

Local, Regional, and Ethical laws aside, you can use Ubuntu server for whatever you need. Ubuntu is free and community driven, so people use it for many different things. There is no EULA with Ubuntu (like there is with Windows and Mac) so you have total control, but you also must take all the responsibility for your actions. IE, if your local or regional ...



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