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There is no inherent difference between system groups and 'normal' groups, just like there is none between system users and regular users. It is by convention that human users are assigned uids from a certain number (e.g. 1000) upwards, whereas system users get uids in a range below that number. The actual uid number, apart from the special uid 0 which is ...


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Have you already tried the old trick of cleaning up the hosts files? I mean rm -rf .ssh/known_hosts It's worth trying as ssh will rebuild it and you will get rid of stale stuff. You can of course also remove the parts belonging to a given IP / Host. More questions: Is your cron job running under your UID or is it running as user cron or root?


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Solved my own problem. Answer was here. TL;DR - Change the folder's permissions by typing $ chmod 755 ~/.config/nautilus-actions in terminal. I found the answer in a post from 2012. Would be nice to know why this weird bug showed up again.


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Boot your PC while holding Ctrl+Shift, you should see the GRUB menu appear. While focusing on the first Ubuntu entry, press e to edit it. You should see a line which ends with ro quiet splash --. Change this last part to: rw verbose init=/bin/bash -- Don't touch the first part of the string, leave it the same as before. Now press Ctrl+X to boot. You ...


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How can you modify your username to match that of root? Typing sudo su on terminal once started will let you act as root for the entire session.


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Add the following debian/my_package.postint to create the directory and change its permissions: #!/bin/sh #DEBHELPER# set -e mkdir -p /opt/mydirectory chmod 777 /opt/mydirectory Then build your package with dpkg-buildpackage -b for example.


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I had the same problem, I put it in /etc/fstab so it mounts automatically on boot.


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The last command in that set: sudo chown your_user -R /etc/transmission-daemon/settings.json sets your user as the owner of the settings file, and that file has read-permissions only for the owner by default. Transmission won't even be able to read it. Try: sudo service transmission-daemon stop chmod g+rw /etc/transmission-daemon/settings.json sudo ...


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While your user may have permission to read the file, your user doesn't have permission to write the file. Use ls -l <filename> to list permissions, owner and group of the file. If appropriate, change permissions or owner so you can write to the file. How to use the chown command chown changes the user and/or group ownership of for given file. The ...


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This command: sudo sed "s/\(^$(whoami):\)[^:]*/\1/" /etc/shadow > /etc/shadow won't work, since the redirection isn't part of the sudo. Instead, do: sudo sed -i.bak "s/\(^$(whoami):\)[^:]*/\1/" /etc/shadow I have made this edit on the original post as well.


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I think you are mixing permissions somehow... as root you should be able to edit it from a console (sudo vi /etc/cups/cups-pdf.conf) and change the Out setting to what you need. An alternative: making ~/PDF a symlink, unfortunately doesn't work.


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I got it fine with the following command: chmod -R 755 $directory Here $directory is the directory that contains the ISE software.


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Try change your backup location to your user folder /home/[username]/backup. Your existing user account might not have permission accessing the /var/backups. Otherwise, you can use chown and chmod command to make /var/backups folder accessible by your account.


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The simplest solution may be to boot using a live CD, mount the file system and change the permissions from there.


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There are several methods. The easiest will probably be: install -m a+x /bin/chmod . ./chmod You can use perl. see man 2 chmod. perl -e 'chmod 0755, "/bin/chmod"'


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Do not use the database user as the UNIX user. Use www-data. sudo chown -R www-data:www-data /var/www There is a difference between the database user and the Apache user. The Apache User is the only one who can actually read the files. The database user is only meant for giving/taking database read/write permissions. In addition, keep the default ...


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Can not be deleted by ANYONE, even root. Nope. root can always remount the disk or (better) remove any restrictions you put into place. ReadOnly access to ALL users (except nobody) See 3. Write access ONLY by my user (test-user). Root shouldn't be able to write. Nope. root can always remove any restrictions you put into place. You can mount ...


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Following is possible: If you have directory named dir1 then use chattr as follows: sudo chattr +i dir1 From man chattr: A file with the `i' attribute cannot be modified: it cannot be deleted or renamed, no link can be created to this file. Now If any user even with sudo/root! try to delete this directory by CLI or GUI, it gives error: Operation ...


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If the VPN configuration tab is greyed out it's because the required plugins are not installed for Gnome NetworkManager. The following plugin should be installed: network-manager-pptp and network-manager-pptp-gnome - network management framework PPTP plugin GNOME GUI To install the above plugin use the apt-get command as follows: $sudo apt-get install ...


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Why don't you just give yourself permission to run pkill without a password: sudo visudo add rajesh ALL = NOPASSWD: /usr/bin/pkill You'll still need to sudo pkill, but you won't have to type a password.


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It's a bug in firefox - but easy to work around. Usually, the directory for downloaded files is allways the same, and you make the dialog not ask every time for a directory. Now, the directory is - for some reason - no longer writable. Firefox could just tell you, and ask to choose a different download directory. The bug is that it does not do this last ...


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Did you check the write permission on the directory where you wish to save? You can also try to run firefox as root, if it works then it is a permission problem. Use the following: sudo firefox


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Using the -R modifier on chmod will allow you to modify permissions recursively to all subdirectories ie. chmod -R 777 /example Then all directories behind /example should be configured with full rwx. I hope this is what you were looking for.


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Just add the -R option to recursively change the permissions of files. An example, recursively add read and write permissions for the owner and group on foldername: sudo chmod -R ug+rw foldername If you want to change all files and folders use: sudo chmod -R ug+rw * You can change all these to be owned by the user kasiya with: sudo chown -R ...


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Essentially, yes. When you download a file from the Internet, you're grabbing the data which is inside the file. What you're not getting is the permissions which are applied to the file. That's done on your local filesystem. To make a file executable on your local system, drop into a terminal and run chmod +x filename.sh That tells your filesystem to ...


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I had the same problem , I edit the /etc/apache2/apache2.conffile and add <Directory /var/www/ > Order allow,deny Allow from all Require all granted </Directory> and reset the apache2 sudo service apache2 restart work for me .


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The Xauthority file was pointing to a group that doesn't exist and thus stuck at the login. I SSHed into my machine and removed the .Xauthority file, logging out and logging in creates a new Xauthority file with relevant permissions and thus logs into the account. Thanks @muru a lot for helping me on this issue. Also setting the Xauthority file to another ...


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Try changing the owner and group of that directory to www-data and setting permissions for owner/group to rwx sudo chown -R www-data:wwwdata /var/www/html/assets/img sudo chmod -R 755 /var/www/html/assets/img


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www-data is the user that the apache2 webserver runs as in Ubuntu. (Usually that user has a UID of 33, the number you see.) So files created using the webserver are owned by that file. When you create a file thus, the umask of the server comes into play and any permissions you set are controlled by the umask. You can work around this in three ways: Use ...


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As per muru's request, the solution I found from http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=804083 is as follows: I had the same problem and enabled the trash function for ntfs and vfat partitions that are mounted by fstab as follows: 1) Backup fstab. 2) Add uid=1000,gid=1000 as options to the partition's fstab entry (see example below). ...


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To prevent ports from opening, you should stop the services opening them (or disable their automatic startup). Then, you will be able to start or stop them manually using the service command. Of course, it's possible to block ports with a firewall, but this will run useless services and create errors. BTW, the port 443 is allocated to bacula (a distributed ...


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It seems like you are creating a traffic ACL on the virtual hub at: Manage Virtual Hub -> Manage Access Lists This kind of rule does not restrict connections to the virtual hub. If you want to restrict connections to the virtual hub from a particular subnet, then you need to set a rule at: Manage Virtual Hub -> Virtual Hub Properties -> IP Address ...


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Informative knowledge is provided with the help of The Linux Command-line as refrence/source. First of all it is very essential to know about ugo and rwx manner: Understanding of attribute which can be out put by ls-l: Applying Permission: Using Octal number: Hence Following work same like: chmod +x [file_name] chmod 777 [file_name] And ...


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I noticed two problems here. Two lines in the error log stood out to me: SEVERE: Cannot find specified temporary folder at /var/lib/tomcat7/temp and: java.io.FileNotFoundException: /var/lib/tomcat7/conf/tomcat-users.xml (Permission denied) Doing a bit of diagnosis with @Lucio, I figured out that the tomcat-users.xml file was not owned by Tomcat, ...


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In ubuntu apache, the default configuration is not to allow random virtual site roots by default Edit /etc/apache2/apache2.conf, and the following lines (preferably, after the default directory blocks so that you can keep track of the locations you have enabled for site root) <Directory /home/vg/www> Options Indexes FollowSymLinks ...


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There could be several reasons that it's not working, but rather than troubleshoot the "simpler" method, it would probably be much easier (and much more secure) to share it only with yourself, unless you need to share it with others, in which case they would need a login on the system, and the folder would need to allow access by them. If you only share it ...


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The syntax of fstab is: device mount-point type options fs_freq fs_passno (or, as you can see in the header comments:) <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass> In this case they are asking you to add acl to the options, and the options in the example are defaults, whereas ...


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This is messed up very badly. For starters: cd / chown root:root -R bin boot cdrom etc initrd.img* lib lib64 lost+found mnt opt root run sbin srv tmp usr var vmlinuz* # essentially everything except home and media chown root:root home media # we don't want to recursively chown here. I assume you have a root shell open somewhere. If not, try pkexec ...


0

Okay, I'll answer my own question. It is definitely possible. //host/share /mnt/folder username=something,password=password,uid=65534,gid=65534,file_mode=0777,dir_mode=0777,utf8, 0 0 I love Linux. If you think it should be possible, there's usually a way. Solved


3

Your suggestion is incorrect. Convert is available for all users. If you're converting into a PDF and you're seeing Unable to open image 'xxx.pdf', the program has tried to open xxx.pdf for writing and has been rebuffed by the Kernel because the current user can't write to that file. There are a couple of reasons: The current $USER can't write to the ...


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I ran vim using strace. I created a file in /tmp named "abc" with content "foo", set it read-only (chmod 400 abc), opened it in vim (strace -o vim.log vim abc) and saved it using ":wq!". Here is the strace log: ... getcwd("/tmp", 4096) = 5 write(1, "\33[?25l\"abc\"", 11) = 11 stat("abc", {st_mode=S_IFREG|0400, st_size=4, ...}) = ...


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Remove the read permission for others (or group, if user2 is part of user1's primary group) from the directories in the tree: chmod o-r /home/User1 -R chmod o+r /home/User1/Music/Aerosmith/Rocks -R As long as the execute permissions remain, User2 will be able to traverse the directory tree, but not see the contents.


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A solution is to first change permissions in the Trash folder (and then to empty it in the usual way:) cd ~/.local/share/Trash sudo chown -R your_user_name:your_group * (And then empty it the usual way)


0

I then tried this: sudo chown root:root ~/ got no output and then sudo chmod -R 777 ~/ That pretty much solved my problem but for two files which returned chmod: cannot access `/home/leo/.gvfs': Permission denied chmod: cannot access `/home/leo/.config/google-chrome/.com.google.Chrome.Z07tM9': No such file or directory.


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Since you have the UUID, you can edit /etc/fstab and add an entry like so: UUID=<the UUID> /media/drivename vfat rw,nofail,umask=022,uid=<UID>,gid=<GID> 0 0 Replace <UID> and <GID> with the output of id -u and id -g respectively. Explanation: We need the UUID since the drive is a removable one, and we can't rely on ...


0

You are not pidginarch when doing touch so it requires sudo. So sudo touch test would be to do it. By the way: I would not create a directory in / myself but probably use /usr/local/ and then the sub-directory in there that is suitable for the file itself.


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Can you do this to change the permissions of the drive to root only sudo chmod 700 /media/path/to/your/DVDRom Your mount point is in /media/DVDdrivenamehere This will make it requier root password and sudo chmod 777 /media/path/to/your/DVDRom Will allow full accsess againg To disable DVD auto-play open system settings and go to details On the left ...


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According to the Ownership and Permissions section of the NTFS-3G documentation, we can use mount options to control file access and creation. The combinations are very complicated (see the two tables there). Also I do not read and get all of them. For example, I do not know whether POSIX ACLs is selected at compile-time or not of the NTFS-3G binary ...


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I see (judging from the folder name and path) you're trying to install Tor Browser from the WebUpd8 Tor Browser PPA. There's a bug in the PPA package which I will fix in a few minutes. So in about 30minutes-1hour, use the following commands to update Tor Browser sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install tor-browser Then it should work.


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Ok, looks like I figured it out. Poking around on my laptop, I tried to run the rsync command (that rsnapshot would normally invoke over ssh) manually as the backup user and noticed I was getting permission errors locally as well. It seems that even if you have the entry in your sudoers file to explicitly allow a user run a certain binary without a ...



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