Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I tried all these things and the system tells me that "Nautilus isn't load" I can't open a folder, on GUI mode, with all the rights, even I'm the only one administrator!!! What's about? ???


0

Another possible cause could be with the AllowedUsers configuration in /etc/ssh/sshd_conf. NOTE: the list is space delimited (not comma delimited) as I learned the hard way. AllowUsers user1 user2 user3


0

Not sure if this should be an answer or a comment but the problem seems to have been solved by giving the windows session user the Full Control permission and taking ownership of it via the Directory Properties -> Security Tab in Windows. I'm not sure if this counts as an askubuntu question anymore but since the problem started with a dual-boot, I'm ...


0

Connecting to the server in the format smb://user@sharename prompted me for a domain and password, and I was able to gain access to the share. Hurray!


0

Hold CTRL+Alt then hit T A Terminal window should open, and you will see a $-prompt where you may type commands. Type sudo -i nautilus & and hit Enter This should open "Files" (Ubuntu default file manager) and allow to read (and possibly write to) your old HD. If that does not work, then your most viable option is using "Testdisk" which is described ...


0

It seems I've figured it out. It seems that I wasn't unmounting the previous mounts before running mount -a I've added noperm, file_mode=0777, dir_mode=0777 and UID=your username to the mount. The UID will change ownership of the folder, and file / dir mode changes the permissions.


0

It could be the permissions issue. What actually you should do is check your permissions on /media/media/Big Drive/Music: ls -l /media/media/Big Drive/Music it could like in your case as this: drwx------- or something like that then proceed like following: sudo chmod w+r /media/media/Big Drive/Music but if you want only just let people read files ...


1

The folder localdata has the wrong permissions. To change the permission of a subfolder is not enough. The whole path need the right permissions. Either you change the group for /localdata too via sudo chgrp perma /localdata and to be sure sudo chmod g+x /localdata or you set the the search permission for directories x for all users sudo chmod o+x ...


0

I managed to stop the error messages and generate the sitemaps automatically. When the server was created the cloud computing service provider had created a user. When I took control of the server I created my own user. The problem was fixed by setting the sitemap folders to be owned by the former user. I still don't know why setting the folder to ...


2

You probably messed up either the owner or the permissions of your directory /home/pinank/.gnome2/accels This can be fixed and reset to the correct values: permissions: drwx------ or 700 (equal permissions, but different notation) It means that it's a directory (d) and that only the owning user has full access (read/write/execute) while neither the ...


2

As the output of ls -ld node suggests the node directory is owned by user nikos (and group nikos), not by root with a permission of 700. As a result being user nikos you you have read, write, execute permission in that directory. Also note that sudo chmod -R 0700 myfolder does not change the ownership to root, it simply sets the permission bits as 0700 as ...


0

"Writable by non-owner" means that the current permissions of /var/lib/sudo allow either the file's group group or the file's other group to write into the directory, whilst only the owner (root) should be able to do so. Removing the write permission for the group group and for the other group (chmod go-w /var/lib/sudo) should suffice, however since the ...


0

If Deluge is creating the files then that is where you need to change the permissions. One solution is to use ACLs, another is to change the umask for the deluge service and add users to the service group.


2

The standard permissions for the file /etc/shadow are 640 (-rw-r-----) % stat -c "%a %n" /etc/shadow 640 /etc/shadow % ls -la /etc/shadow -rw-r----- 1 root shadow 1870 Aug 25 17:32 /etc/shadow Therefore boot your system in recovery mode (you need only the steps 1..4) and change the permission again: chmod 640 /etc/shadow In the recovery mode, you ...


1

Regarding your first question - this is normal UNIX behavior. It will not display anything while you type a password. It is "concealed". Trust that it is indeed there, and press Enter when you're finished typing. Since concealing like this is possible by using a simple ANSI escape code (the same method by which we color and bold text in the terminal), it is ...


-2

When you run command ls -l on any directory the first column is the permission column which is interpreted as follows: 1-----2 3 4-------5 6 7-------8 9 10 T----(user)-----(group)----(others) Y P E TYPE : If '-', it is a file. If 'd' it is a directory. Permissions: read: 4, write: 2, execute: 1 So for read, write and execute ...


12

Steeldriver is right. On directory you need also x access flag to be able to list files inside. Fixing the directory using chmod 700 ~/.ssh should help you to get into this (correct) state: $ ls -ld ~/.ssh drwx------. 2 user user 4096 Aug 26 10:37 /home/user/.ssh Also you should fix your keys using chmod 600 ~/.ssh/id_rsa and chmod 644 ~/.ssh/*.pub to ...


0

Changing it to 660 does not cause any problems if you do it through logrotate.conf. That is the proper way to do it. You can however test it by changing it manually sudo su chmod 660 /var/log/wtmp would be the 2 commands to do this. For example the command "last" will then show a "permission denied". Setting it to 644 will cause problems though: the ...


1

Just extending\simplifying previous 'stat' related answers: You can simply run: stat <path_to_file> The output will contain octal permission along with other info. Details(stat version and example): # stat --version stat (GNU coreutils) 8.4 [user@localhost ~]# touch /tmp/TEST_PERMISSONS [user@localhost ~]# chmod 644 /tmp/TEST_PERMISSONS ...


0

Got the solution "--sudo --use-sudo-password" helped doing it ! $knife bootstrap 52.8.178.221 -x ubuntu -i ~/Keys/chef1.pem --sudo --use-sudo-password


7

This answer is complementary to Heather's one (which will work). First of all, take into account that in Unix (and Linux) if one is able to take root privileges, they can do anything. In the case of Heather answer, nothing will stop your user to just sudo /usr/bin/applicationcommand (with a bit of search for the real path or whatever). But I suppose this ...


2

Windows and Ubuntu have completely different security architectures (Ubuntu being the more secure one) so it just refuses to open the folder (=directory). The correct way of doing this under Ubuntu is to give permissions on that directory to a group and have you as a member of that group and then you will be able to open this. As this is a Windows share, ...


0

If you used: sudo chmod 666 /mnt/nameofdrive It will give you read and write privileges, but you need execute permission to look inside any directories. You may want to try 777 instead, though this is entirely insecure, it can definitely let you know if permissions are causing the problems.


5

Try using setuid from package super. Do sudo apt-get install super, then create a shell script that can only be run as root. Have that shell script run only one command: #!/bin/sh setuid $ORIG_USER applicationcommand exit 0 Then, set an alias for each of the users so that applicationcommand points to the shell script you created by adding into each of ...


0

There is a feature (?) called Fast Startup which is turned on by default in Windows 8, 8.1 & 10. It is a setting that helps your PC start up faster after shutdown. Windows does this by saving system info to a file (hiberfil.sys) upon shutdown. Ubuntu detects this as a corrupt NTFS partition. Windows 7 also detects this as corrupt but repairs it making ...


2

You may want to read about apparmor for Ubuntu and selinux for rpm based distros like Centos. https://wiki.ubuntu.com/AppArmor http://selinuxproject.org/page/Main_Page


1

First, a note about the security systems involved: sudo and gksudo are governed by sudoers, but much of the GUI uses polkit, whose configuration is independent of sudoers. There are not many common factors: Ubuntu uses the sudo group to grant administrative privileges in both systems. Both support PAM, so PAM configuration can affect both. In particular, ...


1

Terminal doesn't show password while you typing (not even Bullets or Stars) So when it prompt for password, just type your password blindly, and press Enter


1

First you need to create directory where you can attach windows partition using mount command (for example /media/c for C:): sudo mkdir -p /media/c Now find out list of partition (click on System > Administration > Disks ) or use following command: sudo fdisk -l If /dev/hdb1 is NTFS partition. Now type following command: sudo mount -t ntfs ...


4

Complete Solution: The following steps will help you achieve the desired output: Create a new script file (replace create_dir.sh with your desired script name): vim ~/create_dir.sh The script will be created in the user’s home directory Add some commands that only a root or sudo user can execute like creating a folder at the root directory level: mkdir ...


-1

Have you tried this: sudo bash sudo su sudo sh /.setup.sh ~/desktop/installer3.0$ ls and then it might work fine this way.


0

Which password are you typing in? Your steam account or your user password on the computer? I imagine it's asking for a sudo command, and typing your steam password then would result »sorry, try again« Although, I agree with Serg that this sounds fishy. Steam starts terminal but doesn’t ask for my password.


-1

Someone may have hacked or changed the password into your steam or ubuntu account's password. Make sure you try nothing or even "password". Look at /etc/shadow, your password is stored in it, but be careful, beacuse it's SHA-Encrypted and needs root.


2

When at the Terminal and it asks you for a password, it seems that you're not writing, but actually you are. Try to write your password again and press Enter


2

I won't pretend to be able to make sense of the thicket of options you have given samba for the external HDD. Suffice it to say that I have a similar setup that works very well with just the following: path = /... force user = debian-transmission read only = No create mask = 0666 directory mask = 0777 veto files = /lost+found/ browsable = yes guest ok = Yes ...


0

I managed to get to the grub menu holding the shift key and boot an older version of the kernel. It's seems to be working...not sure what was the exact problem. I'll update this answer if I discover something. (FYI you can access a root shell from the recovery mode but it seems you need to mount your partitions after that)


0

As stated in the comments, there isn't a way to control sudoers in the way requested, although there are fine grained permissions available in the system: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/FilePermissionsACLs But even that isn't quite enough, you'd basically have to replace all the standard program libraries with scripts to filter flags. Which would be ...


0

In my case solution was to add noperm option on the fstab entry


0

Hi this might probably fix your issue https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Samba/SambaServerGuide grts


0

I solved this issue. After several trial & error, what I did was: I rolled back an earlier backup (2 months old) I re-tried installing lamp sever using: sudo tasksel install lamp-server This helped me identify the missing directories. I manually created the missing folders in the mysql directory Next, I ran these commands sudo dpkg-reconfigure ...


2

This should do the trick: sudo chown $USER [filenames] Note: $USER is literal, replace [filenames] with one or many file names or globs, for example: sudo chown $USER *.md


0

The is necessary to change the owner of the files to your user: sudo chown $USER:$USER file file file ....


0

You need to either change the permissions of those files, or change the owner. To change the permissions use chmod, and to change the owner use chown As a quick and dirty fix try sudo chmod 777 <filename>. Using permission 777 is a bad idea as it gives every permission to every user.


1

In Ubuntu setup, you cannt set a blank password. That's how UNIX and UNIX-like operating systems work to protect some of the administrators functionnality that can affect the system. So there is a password and you have to find the one that set it up.


0

Just to follow up in case anyone stumbles upon this. The vsftpd.conf file has to have the following line added: virtual_use_local_privs=YES


1

There are some problems with gksu and gedit. Just execute sudo gedit /etc/default/grub.


1

The are you root? part shows that you do not have the privileges of installing new software. Try using sudo with your command to execute them as root user. First run the command sudo apt-get update and then you can try to install the application with sudo apt-get install app_name where app_name is the application you want to install.


0

A working solution is to change AllowSupplementaryGroups false -> true in /etc/clamav/clamd.conf restart clamav-daemon


2

You have to add that user to sudo group with usermod command. For instance, for me this would be like so usermod --groups serg,sudo serg More info in the man usermod, eg -G, --groups GROUP1[,GROUP2,...[,GROUPN]]] A list of supplementary groups which the user is also a member of. Each group is separated from the next by a comma, with no ...


0

make sure you added both users using smbpasswd -a <username> and also check permission of shared directory chmod 770 /mnt/data/share/Pictures if you want to use any group then all users that you want to allow access shared directory should be member of that group. create group using groupadd smbuser assign group to share directory ...



Top 50 recent answers are included