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0

One way to figure this out would be to create a 'dummy'user and then log into your system as that user. I suspect that the applications will not be visible to that person. I dont think you will need to go to 'chown' for this.


0

When you first go to terminal you are in the home directory. The partition you made would place your folder in the /media directory. I am working to reproduce the problem using Ubuntu 14.04 as my previous experience was using Ubuntu 10.04. Then I can give more detailed instructions. OK, I have just created a new partition using GParted. I go into the file ...


0

The problem is that you cannot paste into a directory where the owner is root unless you do so with root privileges. To fix this go into terminal and find your directory using something like: $ ls -l | grep "^d" In my case I created a subdirectory called Root_Temp and changed its ownership to root. Here is the output (partial) from the command above: ...


0

Problem solved by adding Indexes into the Options directive: In the Directory "node" inside localssl.conf: <Directory /data> Options Indexes FollowSymLinks AllowOverride None Require all granted </Directory>


0

I ended up firing a server I can mess around with more and I tried more combinations. I couldn't get hard or soft to play nice (get it?), so I tried - again and it worked. I also confirmed with ubuntu 14.04 trusty. So, I quote: and using - which I figured sets hard and soft limits (just to see if I can get anything changed): @mygroup - nice ...


4

You're setting 644 which is group read, not write! sudo chown -R www-data:www-data /srv/www sudo chmod -R g+w /srv/www


0

By default only root can edit /var/www/ Use sudo chmod 771 /var/www/ To change the permission to allow group users to write to it.


0

Your question needs to be answered with NO. For it to become an issue: someone first needs to gain access to your machine. If there is no way for someone to gain access exploiting it will be impossible. You do not mention having a web server active. You do not mention this machine being connected to the internet. So the answer is no. Still ... WHY would ...


1

Try gksudo nautilus and enter your password, this will run file browser application with root access so it will have all permissions.


1

There are lots of guides there for apache2 + php-fpm setup on Ubuntu. But yes they do not speak about directory permission and I have been seeing people in my orgainzation struggling with it time to time. Here is the general setup which you should look at: Apache should run as www-data user The php-fpm should be running as www-data user. www-data 1591 ...


1

About an hour ago, I had the same problem. I changed my UID, logged out and logged in. I stuck an external drive in the USB port and saw that it was mounted. When I clicked on the drive icon on the Desktop, UBUNTU said that it doesn't know how to open the file. You are lucky since the error message lead you directly to the problem.I am using XUBUNTU ...


1

Another way is to change the username directly in apache config, this is if it's your local machine and you save images from somewhere else that would crush any permissions made on the folder. Also to do if you have only 1 user and don't care about www-data! $ sudo vi /etc/apache2/apache2.conf Find User and Group and put yours User <Your User> Group ...


-1

Open any terminal (ie press ctrl-alt-t) Enter the following command: sudo nautilus Enter your password What looks like an ordinary file manager will appear, but it will have root permissions everywhere. Be very careful. You can do some real damage with that much power. Please be sure to exit that file manager when you are done.


0

Well you can do it with your file manager used with super user privileges. Try gksu nautilus on terminal and try using the nautilus instance provided. But this is not recommended if you don't know really what you are doing.


-1

Try the below command, sudo chmod a+rw -R After this run, .rvm Then try to install ruby. Hope this helps.


1

It seems you have a bigger problem with your websites because the errors from running that command sudo chown -R $OWNER:$OWNER should be this: chown: missing operand after ‘:’ Try 'chown --help' for more information. Basically stating that the command does absolutely nothing because it makes no sense as no file was specified (missing operand) and ...


1

I think you only need the mount option uid=[youruserid] In a terminal you can type echo $UID or id -u to find out your user id. If the drive's fs is fat, ntfs, cd-rom, udf, and a few others uid=value will "Set the owner and group of all files" to whose id is specified. If the partition's already mounted (mount to see it & what device it is, or blkid) ...


1

Running from a live DVD, if you cannot cd into the folder because of "permission denied" you can use the following command to login as root: sudo su Logging in as root is not typically recommended and should only be done as a last resort and not just to be lazy! You can use the following command to log out of root: exit


0

It probably has to do with how the drive is mounted. If the drive is not mounted with proper ownership, you wont be able to access it. unmount the drive with umount. Then mount it again with the proper permissions: Lets say your UID is 1000 and the drive is a FAT partition then your mount statement should look a bit like this sudo mount -t vfat ...


1

A general recipe to set permissions on kernel modules access is to add a file to /etc/udev/rules.d. For example, you can create a file /etc/udev/rules.d/99-kvm.rules with the following text: KERNEL=="kvm", GROUP="kvm-users"


0

As far as I understand, the CIFS share is shared on a Windows machine and mounted on Ubuntu... If my assumption is correct, just define UID "root" with the same PWD on the Windows machine. If not, leave a note @Fabby and I'll delete my answer...


-1

As of root open /etc/passwd to edit: sudo vim /etc/passwd and change the user's name at the beginning of a line: user:x:500:501:username:home/user:/bin/bash to: newuser:x:500:501:username:home/user:/bin/bash then if you worked of root just login, and if you have been logged in to user, logoff, and relogin.


0

First, I'd like to acknowledge existing answers: As UweBurger says one uses * for a general wildcard in Ubuntu (or, I believe, Unix in general). (Is it possible that directory in your example is empty, causing the error chmod: cannot access ‘directory/*’: No such file or directory?) As northern-bradley suggested, one can use the R flag in chmod to make it ...


1

I solved my problem installing texlive-full as suggested by Xavier. I know it is not the best solution for everyone because it is a lot of files but it worked for me. So the command is the following: sudo apt-get install texlive-full I hope it will help someone else.


1

.gvfs is a virtual file system for gnome. Leave this as it is; mess with it and your system probably (most likely) will fail to work as intended. .install4j is a java installer builder. Can be removed but it will depend on why you installed it and if you still need it. .rpmdb is the RPM package database. If you do not use the Redhat package manager then ...


0

What I think the issue is is that a parent directory is blocking the permission to the LXC rootfs. So you should move the /var/www directory in the container to /var/local/www/ in the host, then bind mount it into the container and change your host nginx config to point to that new location. In the host run: install -m 750 -o 100000 -g www-data -d ...


1

The ls issue sounds like you might not have sufficient privileges on the directory. As http://stackoverflow.com/a/15800917/3501748 states: directories need the execute permission set in order to see their contents. cd back a level and see what the permissions are on the directory you have just come from. sudo does not give you any rights to access a ...


2

The file extension in linux is nothing special, it is just part of the file name. The file globbing of the the shell uses * for all charakters so just use chmod a+x * instead of .


0

Okay so after hitting hammer in my head, I found working properly. However I am not so sure if I have done correctly or there is any better approach to make it works. What I have done first is, Change permission for entire /var/www again. I just wonder, why I have to reset it after pasting the site, I have done that before. sudo chmod -R 775 /var/www You ...


0

I was able to connect my redmi 1s directly w/o an issue. It was available in Devices in Nautilus. I will suggest you to update your ubuntu sudo apt-get update Or simply run Software Updater and update ubuntu base and drivers.


0

make sure you set the permission like this: sudo adduser <username> www-data sudo chown -R www-data:www-data /var/www sudo chmod -R g+rw /var/www make sure that you have Servername localhost written somewhere in /etc/apache2/apache2.conf file after this sudo apache2 restart after this whenever you will be making new file in /var/www/html folder ...


0

See man run-parts It says, in part: NAME run-parts - run scripts or programs in a directory SYNOPSIS run-parts [--test] [--verbose] [--report] [--lsbsysinit] [--regex=RE] [--umask=umask] [--arg=argument] [--exit-on-error] [--help] [--version] [--list] [--reverse] [--] DIRECTORY run-parts -V DESCRIPTION run-parts ...


-2

acl are not exactly unix/linux standard. I know RH keeps trying to push them but they confuse more then they help. I would strip the ACL data and just use chmod/chown/chgrp. setfacl --remove-all p # see if that works.


1

OK, so you have 2 users: 1 called "root" (big no-no, but anyway, that's what you have) and 1 called "username"... Then the command is : cp /root/.matlab/* /home/username/.matlab/


0

It's to do with order of inclusion (list order). The config snippets will be iterated over one at a time to produce the full set of configuration options for the application. By adding the numbers at the beginning of each filename it allows shell scripts (and other types of programs) to easily grab the directory listing and then process the scripts in the ...


0

You want to change the users' umask There is an answer describing it here. TL;DR $ umask 007 for each user.


0

From the what I can understand, this is the state of things: You were the original user, and probably have sudo privilege either by your username or by your other groups. But the PolicyKit privileges are still the default from Ubuntu (members of groups sudo and admin, and the root user). You can verify this: sudo cat ...


0

I had same issue, and that was a mistake I had made when sym-linking the transmission download directory to my home/user/ directory, I changed the ownership of the sym-linked file which by consequence also changed the ownership of the transmission 'download' directory... I just chowned back to 'debian-transmission' ownership and it worked like a charm ...


1

This topic has already discussed in the below forum topic, http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=917422 Probably this could help you in setting up your requirement.


1

You shouldn't just drop stuff into sites-enabled. You should use a2ensite to enable the site configuration in Apache. The syntax is a2ensite [site].


0

You need to modify the privileges of the user account which will set up the VPN. I'm using Xubuntu 14.04.1 LTS (running in VirtualBox 4.3.20 on 64-bit Windows 7), so the instructions may differ slightly for you if you're using stock Ubuntu. Find the "Users and Groups" tool in 'Settings'. Click "Advanced Settings" on the right of the dialog (and provide ...


0

Since you're making webusers the group owner of the directory, if the user that the webserver runs under is part of that group, you shouldn't need a chown. For example, the usual user of webserver process on Ubuntu is www-data, and that user is part of the www-data group. By making any directory owned by the www-data group, the webserver would be able to ...


0

No, it depends on how you want to give security to you files and directories. By default following permissions are given, directory 777 file 666 7 means binary 111 which is converted into binary and added to the table of directory information, And it will be translated as 111 111 111 read writ execute / read writ execute / read writ ...


1

You are right, if you did that, you changed the mode of / of the live-system, but you want to change the mode of / of your root-partition on your hard-disk, so you first need to mount your hard-disk. Assuming your root-partition is /dev/sda2, enter mount /dev/sda2 /mnt to mount your root-partition to /mnt. Then change to that mount-point and change the ...


1

You could give all users r/w/x permission on the directory: chmod -R guo+rwx /path/to/shared/directory If you only want to enable certain users to use the directory, then create a new user group, add all authorized users to it: (All these commands require root/sudo) #Create group groupadd projectshare #Add users to the group. Execute for each user: ...


0

Following the suggestion of douggro I was able to get things done properly, even without an entry in fstab: sudo mount -t cifs //ip-adr-of-seagate/user /mnt/centraldrive -o username=user,pass=password,uid=1000,gid=1000,iocharset=utf8,sec=ntlm,file_mode=0777,dir_mode=0777


0

Go to the therminal. Use the necessary command. For example : sudo chmod 754 file.x . Wich command? You will find it here : http://catcode.com/teachmod/ (tutorial for chmod)


1

In the ext filesystem, which is used in Linux, inodes are used to describe stored files. An inode contains attributes of a file as well as its data block locations (these are the blocks that contain the actual contents of the file). The following is briefly what is stored in an inode: Inode number File access, modify and changed timestamps File size ...


0

Not sure what filesystem is on the external drive, but if it's one that knows "owners" maybe you're not the owner of the directory/files, so can't change it. Could try going into (cd) the mounted drive and sudo chown [yourusername] -R . using whatever your username is (see whoami) so you become the owner.



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