New answers tagged

0

I found the solution myself and I want to share it with you: In the past, I entered my known hosts only in the /etc/hosts file. After entering the same into /etc/hosts.allow file everything works fine.


0

Ok, so I'm still not exactly sure whats going on... but I got the guest account to work with file and folder permissions set to 755. To get it working, I had to do smbpassswd -a nobody (with no password). This still doesn't really make sense as if samba needs this account in its own database, then it shouldn't even be able to read the directory in the first ...


0

If you are doing this so that you can create files in htdocs folder then Just navigate to opt/lampp and then open in terminal and write sudo chmod 777 htdocs/ Thats it!


0

Giving the mount point of your SD card partition the correct ownership should do the trick. If you want the user who mounted the SD card to still have ownership permissions, you could change the group of /media/user/name/ and all of the files and folders it contains to www-data with: chgrp -R www-data /media/user1/Núbia Ensure that all of those files and ...


3

Running untrusted software as a new user is a good start, but it may not be enough. A lot of files and devices you may consider sensitive are world-readable. Even as an unprivileged user, you can extract a lot of information out of a system (typically you can read /etc for a start). You may not have your own stuff configured properly. For instance, have ...


0

I would try explicitly stating your valid users: valid users = asd your_username another_user Another option (workaround?) would be guest okay = yes but I think that may not allow root privileges.


1

You had a NOPASSWD rule applied to your user in some file in /etc/sudoers.d. Use sudo grep NOPASSWD /etc/sudoers.d -R to find out which. Your /etc/sudoers is not the default, however. The default sudoers can be obtained by looking at the sudo package: $ apt-get download sudo Get:1 http://mirror.cse.iitk.ac.in/ubuntu xenial-updates/main amd64 sudo amd64 1.8....


3

Three quick steps Add your user to the www-data group sudo usermod -a -G www-data username Change the owner of /var/www sudo chown -R username:www-data /var/www Change the permissions recursively on /var/www sudo chmod -R 644 /var/www NB: Replace username in the commands with your username.


0

search for processes. ps -A | grep apt-get kill that process then, sudo rm /var/lib/apt/lists/lock If the error persists, apply following commands in a termina, sudo su sudo rm /var/lib/apt/lists/lock apt-get update If the error persists, apply following commands in a terminal, sudo su sudo rm /var/lib/apt/lists/lock apt-get update


0

sudo passwd -a username and set your password for your given username, use it when Windows asks for the name and password.


2

I was not sure myself so I experimented a little as follows: Opened pcmanfm using gksudo pcmanfm Navigated to /etc and opened a text file from within pcmanfm using Right Click and Open with Leafpad Edited a text file and successfully saved it So you do not have to run gksudo leafpad to edit text files not editable as an ordinary user while using pcmanfm ...


4

That's not the sticky bit, that's the setuid bit. A sticky bit usually applies to directories, you can see that in /tmp for example: $ stat -c '%A %n' /tmp /bin/ping /usr/bin/crontab drwxrwxrwt /tmp -rwsr-xr-x /bin/ping -rwxr-sr-x /usr/bin/crontab The t indicates a sticky bit, an s in user modes indicate setuid and an s in group modes indicate setgid. ...


1

The d refers to directories (folders). Your index.php file is not a directory, it is a file. Therefore, you should not see the d.


0

When you have made changes to a Raspberry Pi OS and it will not boot, there is no way of using a LiveUSB system to correct it, as you would on any other Ubuntu machine. Fortunately, it's easy to pull out the SD card and change it from another computer with a card reader. On the SD card there will be two partitions. The first one is /boot; it contains a FAT ...


0

Ubuntu 16.04 has disabled dsa keys and now only accepts rsa keys. This got me too, but fortunately I had password access still enabled. You can add Host * PubkeyAcceptedKeyTypes=+ssh-dss to ~/.ssh/config, or switch to rsa keys. Once you get in...


0

Try this: Open a terminal,Press Ctrl+Alt+T Run it: exec sudo -i apt-get update apt-get dist-upgrade apt-get install --reinstall exfat-fuse exfat-utils chmod -Rf 777 /media/Movies


0

From other answers found and ran A. steps at : http://askubuntu.com/a/253946/165511 Kill the process named apt-get: killall -9 apt-get Reconfigure dpkg: dpkg --configure -a Update apt-get: apt-get update Update packages, including those improperly installed: apt-get upgrade B. Was able to run : sudo apt-get install lib32stdc++6 C. When ...


0

If you are compiling the program and running the executable file on an external drive or something similar, move the file to Desktop and recompile and run it there.


13

Wrong command. You need to change owner and group to 'root'. chown root:root /path/to/directory And if you want to harden it even more put the 'immutable' on it with chattr -i /path/to/directory (only 'root' can set this back). chmod 000 /path/to/directory only removes permissions but it is still owned by the user (and the group it belongs to). ...


7

You not only need to change the permissions on this particular folder, you as well have to change the ownership of it. And up to it chmod 000 is a bad idea, because it allows no one to enter it, use 700 instead. Just see my example: chmod 700 /path/folder sudo chown -R root:root /path/folder See here for more information on file permissions.


0

Let's call your new user testapp: You have to remove read access for "other" of all files and folders. chmod -R o-r / then chown -R :testapp /var/www/html/testapp and finally chmod -R g+rwx /var/www/html/testapp Remove your new user from the www-data group, but remember when www-data cannot read files, it won't be readable on your website


1

Edit your sudoers file using sudo visudo. Find this line: Defaults env_reset and change it to this: Defaults env_reset,timestamp_timeout=0 This forces sudo to ask for a password every time your run it.


0

If u have not given password for root and you are trying to fire command on spark or haddop like ./sbin/stop-all.sh or./sbin/start-all.sh . If you don't have a root password, you can setup one using sudo passwd and fire commands.


2

This is an issue of indexing (and not permissions). This setting can be modified in the apache.conf file. To change, open the file /etc/apache2/apache2.conf. You will see this; <Directory /var/www/> Options Indexes FollowSymLinks AllowOverride None Require all granted </Directory> Remove the Indexes from the second ...


1

The file /usr/local/bin/mkyaffs2image doesn't exist, just like the error message is telling you. Check whether this is true by using ls : ls /usr/local/bin/mkyaffs2image If you get a "No such file or directory" error, then the file really doesn't exist. The sudo chmod command that you're using is trying to change the permissions of the two files /usr/...


0

Both of these directories [/usr/local/R/lib/site-library and /usr/lib/R/library] are by default not writable. So why does an R installation default to install there? I've had numerous issues installing R packages into the "default" directory (which I guess is /usr/lib/R/library?), so I've had to install them into a local directory at ~/R/x86_64_pc-...


0

In the case of an NFS server, the server controls who has access to a file. This means that you need to set the permissions on the server, not locally. So basically you need to ask your server admin to create a perma group and add you to it.


0

Simply right click the folders in your home and enable local share, it will offer to install samba files. After that in terminal sudo smbpasswd -a user and set your password and reboot.


0

Another possibility is to make a rules file in /etc/udev/rules.d/ directory. I had similar problem and I have created 50-myusb.rules file in the above directory with this content: KERNEL=="ttyACM[0-9]*",MODE="0666" Note that this will give any device connected to ttyACM socket read/write permissions. If you need only specific device to get read/write ...


3

You can just use the find command. find /path/to/where/to/search -type f -perm -666 Enter path where you want to do the search. The -type f meand that only files will be searched. Finally -perm 666 means that only files with read/write permissions for all users will be matched. Please note that if file has also executable permission for any user it will ...


0

Make sure you don't have another update application open: eg Synaptic, Software Updater, Ubuntu Software, another terminal. Then, as @Dave Sha points out, try using sudo apt-get -f install.


0

if you are running XAMPP on 14.04 this must work sudo chmod 644 /opt/lampp/phpmyadmin/config.inc.php


0

Finally I have been able to solve my problem. In terminal you have to type: systemctl start mysql.service systemctl enable mysql.service /usr/bin/mysql_secure_installation That's it all done


1

The package system-config-samba is available at the universe repository. Enable the Community-maintained free and open-source software (universe) box at Software & Updates under Ubuntu Software tab. Then click reload after you close it.


1

I will add an answer to my own question for anyone that will need this in the future. I followed an answer from @Adam Lussier and have created /etc/udev/rules.d/50-ttyusb.rules file with this content (proposed by @Sneetsher): ACTION=="add", KERNEL=="ttyACM[0-9]*", ATTRS{idVendor}=="ffff", ATTRS{idProduct}=="0005", MODE="0666" Like this only this specific ...


0

Where is your partition mounted? Find that, open a terminal, and change to the directory that contains it. Then type the command ls -l. This will show you who owns the mount point and therefore all the files under it. If it's root, you can change it so that you own it by typing sudo chown [yourusername]:[yourusername] [the mountpoint] It will ask you for ...


0

I can't test it at the moment however, I believe nologin will work for you. sudo usermod -s /usr/sbin/nologin username It will only affect the users shell access, by instead of setting a default shell it will politely tell them to go away. Additionally, postfix.admin may be the tool you're looking for to manage your users with a web interface. http://...


0

Here is a simple script you can run to apply the solution accepted above: https://github.com/trezcan/rpi-emergency-mode


1

Unless overridden by mount options GID= or UID= the owner and permissions of the mount point upon mounting become those of the filesystem tree being mounted. So if /dev/sdb1 contains an ext4 filesystem (say a backup) owned by user then user will become the owner of the mount point upon successful mount. Starting off we have an empty folder 'backup' to ...


0

yes you can, and for flexibility create a userconfig dir and file, mkdir /var/www/userconfs or whatever you want to change the userconfs name to, then create a specific file vi /var/www/userconfigs/ftpuseraccount inside type, local_root=/var/www(or whatever u want to access by dir) guest_username=www-data(the ubuntu owner of the file top edit after ...


1

Best to use absolute paths so you don't change again things you need to stay how they are. So the below commands will make your old home directory readable for you. # this makes only the home directory in the old drive owned by you sudo chown -R mickey:mickey /media/f806aa57-553c-43bc-8338-37851dc128ad/home So now that you have done this I assume you want ...


0

You obviously can access the internet on another machine because you posted this question. You can create an Ubuntu live CD, boot into it, and fix sudo with the following steps. Mount the partitions of your installation to recreate the filesystem at /mnt (sudo mount /dev/<whatever> /mnt, mkdir -p /mnt/home && sudo mount /dev/<whatever2> /...


2

In order to fix this, you can either reinstall sudo, or download a default /etc/sudoers and edit it. Both ways require these steps: First, restart your computer. When the Grub screen displays, instead of choosing Ubuntu xxx, choose Advanced options for Ubuntu xxx. Under Advanced Options, choose Recovery mode. The second step is to mount your partitions rw. ...


2

To answer your question you need a few steps to solve that. As first you create a user and his username, add a group for him and add him to this group. This you can do with one command or multiple commands, first the multiple approach where I add in comment lines for explanation: # adding a user hos with password 123 which you have provide by hand # you ...


4

I recently upgrade my Ubuntu 15.04 to 16.04 and this has worked for me: 1 - First, connect in sudo mysql sudo mysql -u root 2 - Check your accounts present in your db SELECT User,Host FROM mysql.user; +------------------+-----------+ | User | Host | +------------------+-----------+ | admin | localhost | | debian-sys-maint | ...


1

Yes, it gives permission to public users for all those serial devices. You can use ATTRS{idVendor} & ATTRS{idProduct} to filter out target devices: ACTION=="add", KERNEL=="ttyACM[0-9]*", ATTRS{idVendor}=="ffff", ATTRS{idProduct}=="0005", MODE="0666" I add ACTION=="add" to skip other unwanted event remove (device node removed already) & change (...


2

Temporarly enabling r/w does not disable system updates I have tried it: sudo mount -o remount,rw The Important thing to remember is that updates are based on a diffrence between images so this will likely cause some changes you do to be wiped or break after update (or worse, thus the scare and warning you might need to reflash) but in practice just ...


2

Yes - root access and read/write system is easy to achieve. There seem to be multiple methods, but the one I used was the android-gadget-service enable writable command from the tablet. (source: this blog post) About updates while system is writable - I have automatic updates turned off, but it was able to update to OTA11 with the system still writable and ...


-1

Just disable the suPHP mode in apache2, by typing this command on terminal: sudo a2dismod suphp If you want to enable it again: sudo a2enmod suphp


2

I can answer the last two questions, the first question is a little vague, what do you mean by "When I connected to Ubuntu via the Mac, I couldn't sign in", how are you trying to sign in? 1) Please clear up how you are trying to sign into Ubuntu from your mac! 2) Assuming its telling you that you don't have file permissions as opposed to access to the ...



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