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12

Steeldriver is right. On directory you need also x access flag to be able to list files inside. Fixing the directory using chmod 700 ~/.ssh should help you to get into this (correct) state: $ ls -ld ~/.ssh drwx------. 2 user user 4096 Aug 26 10:37 /home/user/.ssh Also you should fix your keys using chmod 600 ~/.ssh/id_rsa and chmod 644 ~/.ssh/*.pub to ...


6

This answer is complementary to Heather's one (which will work). First of all, take into account that in Unix (and Linux) if one is able to take root privileges, they can do anything. In the case of Heather answer, nothing will stop your user to just sudo /usr/bin/applicationcommand (with a bit of search for the real path or whatever). But I suppose this ...


3

Try using setuid from package super. Do sudo apt-get install super, then create a shell script that can only be run as root. Have that shell script run only one command: #!/bin/sh setuid $ORIG_USER applicationcommand exit 0 Then, set an alias for each of the users so that applicationcommand points to the shell script you created by adding into each of ...


3

Complete Solution: The following steps will help you achieve the desired output: Create a new script file (replace create_dir.sh with your desired script name): vim ~/create_dir.sh The script will be created in the user’s home directory Add some commands that only a root or sudo user can execute like creating a folder at the root directory level: mkdir ...


2

When at the Terminal and it asks you for a password, it seems that you're not writing, but actually you are. Try to write your password again and press Enter


2

You may want to read about apparmor for Ubuntu and selinux for rpm based distros like Centos. https://wiki.ubuntu.com/AppArmor http://selinuxproject.org/page/Main_Page


2

The standard permissions for the file /etc/shadow are 640 (-rw-r-----) % stat -c "%a %n" /etc/shadow 640 /etc/shadow % ls -la /etc/shadow -rw-r----- 1 root shadow 1870 Aug 25 17:32 /etc/shadow Therefore boot your system in recovery mode (you need only the steps 1..4) and change the permission again: chmod 640 /etc/shadow In the recovery mode, you ...


1

Windows and Ubuntu have completely different security architectures (Ubuntu being the more secure one) so it just refuses to open the folder (=directory). The correct way of doing this under Ubuntu is to give permissions on that directory to a group and have you as a member of that group and then you will be able to open this. As this is a Windows share, ...


1

Terminal doesn't show password while you typing (not even Bullets or Stars) So when it prompt for password, just type your password blindly, and press Enter


1

Regarding your first question - this is normal UNIX behavior. It will not display anything while you type a password. It is "concealed". Trust that it is indeed there, and press Enter when you're finished typing. Since concealing like this is possible by using a simple ANSI escape code (the same method by which we color and bold text in the terminal), it is ...


1

First, a note about the security systems involved: sudo and gksudo are governed by sudoers, but much of the GUI uses polkit, whose configuration is independent of sudoers. There are not many common factors: Ubuntu uses the sudo group to grant administrative privileges in both systems. Both support PAM, so PAM configuration can affect both. In particular, ...



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