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Both sudo pip install and its other common variant sudo -H pip install should not be encouraged because it is a security risk to use root privileges to use pip to install Python packages from PyPI (Python Package Index). From http://stackoverflow.com/a/21056000/486919 (emphasis mine): When you run pip with sudo, you run setup.py with sudo. In other ...


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The problem on your system is that your umask settings are a bit strange/messed up. For general information about umask please refer to What is "umask" and how does it work? In short we can say that the umask defines the default permission set for new files. It is configured in /etc/login.defs. The default value for umask is 022 which results in ...


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Use pmount instead of mount. pmount ("policy mount") is a wrapper around the standard mount program which permits normal users to mount removable devices without a matching /etc/fstab entry. Probably want the ... -w, --read-write Force the device to be mounted read/write. If neither -r nor -w is specified, the kernel will choose an ...


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When you try to copy /src it shows that the file does not exist because if a path starts with a slash, it is treated as absolute path. That means it is treated as relative to the file system root /. Simply omit the / at the beginning of the local path and don't forget to specify a path on the target computer, like this (running from inside your home ...


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I guess the UID (user ID) that's been assigned to your user on the previous system differs from the new one. Try terdon's hint and check which user owns the file(s) on the second disk: $ ls -l <directory> If this assumption is correct the owner column will either contain a number instead of your own username, or some other username. Also check that ...


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(I know I shouldn't comment in an answer, but not enough reputation to comment.) blade19899's answer worked for me except for symlinks. E.g. it applied 755 to /bin/bash, but then applied 777 to the symlink /bin/rbash, effectively 777-ing /bin/bash. As I already had the fileper.log file, I just modified the destination-end command: while IFS=: read -r -d ''...


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No, this is correct. I cannot validate this claim. I always use sudo -H with pip. pip can only damage operating system files as much as apt. Only do not use sudo with pip when you want to install only for that user.


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Your problem may have its root in various causes, here are the solutions for two of them: Folder and File Permissions Not only the site.com folder, but also all parent folders need to have their permissions set so apache can traverse them. Please check if /home, /home/ihab, /home/ihab/Workspace and /home/ihab/Workspace/Webdev do have proper settings. They ...


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You should change owners. run this command sudo chown newuser: /media/kalenpw/HDD Instead of the "newuser" put your Ubuntu user


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Summary Another cause for your troubles could be, that the data partition might be mounted with noexec mount option in fstab. To evaluate if this is indeed the cause, you should have a look at two little things: the /etc/fstab configuration file, which holds (nearly) all partitions and other stuff that should be mounted at boot time the output of mount ...


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Rinzwind: my stripped-down script I posted in the question above doesn't show it, but there's a problem with the 'pmount' solution. The problem is that it only appears to be able to mount to /media. The full script is more complicated: it creates a 500MB large image file (image of a USB pendrive), partitions it into 2 partitions (FAT32 and Ext3) , mounts ...


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After changing the data directory you need to change the Apparmor settings to solve the permission issue Open /etc/apparmor.d/usr.sbin.mysqld Comment out /var/lib/mysql/ r, /var/lib/mysql/** rwk, Then /mnt/01D0900CA5E8F760/ProgramData/MySQL/MySQLServer5.6/ r, /mnt/01D0900CA5E8F760/ProgramData/MySQL/MySQLServer5.6/** rwk, Also see to it ...



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