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0

You should try forcing the acpi-cpufreq scaling driver. To do so, edit (as sudo) the /etc/default/grub file and change the "GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT" line, adding this (and my example has some other stuff for my case that was there before): GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="ipv6.disable=1 intel_pstate=disable crashkernel=384M-:128M" Then run: sudo ...


0

I don't think that preload is doing much good, because your laptop is 8 years old and therefore it probably doesn't have enough RAM for preload to make much difference. In fact, preload may be slowing your laptop down by using RAM that should be used for the web browser and other applications. In my opinion there isn't much benefit in installing preload ...


0

When I have riduculous high CPU usage, It always seems to be a Python related process. I just kill it inside (Gnome) System monitor, whenever its bugging me again ^^


0

I saw this problem last night. $ sudo ufw allow ssh $ sudo ufw enable Didn't affect my current ssh session, but it did cause a significant delay with ssh logins. For example, an ssh login like below would hang for some period of time before (finally) prompting for a password: $ ssh myusername@mydomain.com $ (wait for 40 seconds or longer until...) ...


0

I have experienced the same problem Host: Ubuntu 14.10 (64-bit), Guest: Windows 7 (64-bit) Even with the virtualization turned on in host BIOS the CPU load was constantly around 40-50% in guest idle state What helped me was installing Guest Addition with Direct 3D support (you need to do that in safe mode) and turning on the host I/O Cache of the SATA ...


-1

Ubuntu doesn't have performance modes, as far as I've seen. The most probable reason of sluggishness is that your hardware isn't good enough to run Ubuntu 14.10 very well. That's why the website says 12.04 works fine. If you want to keep 14.10 on it, though, you can try installing the MATE (GNOME) desktop. In a terminal window, run sudo apt-get install ...


0

I know this is an old question, but there are two things you can try. htop. This is an alternative to top. It adds scrolling and some other useful features, which might help you see a process that might be using a lot of CPU. System Monitor. This is a built-in application and is the Ubuntu equivalent to Windows Task Manager. It will let you sort by ...


0

I have a pretty good laptop running 14.04 I put 14.10 on it and the same thing happened, I would just put 14.04 back on it and maybe try 15.04 when it comes out.


1

htop, which can be installed and run from the Terminal, can be used to show you what apps use a lot of the CPU. It has scrolling, which makes it easier to use than top. System Monitor is a built in application that is the equivalent to Windows Task Manager, and is a graphical alternative to top and htop.


1

If everything works fine in the guest session, you can use the following very simple system to get a performant system again: Go to System Settings User Accounts + and add a user with the same name as your current user but with a 2 attached to the end. In below procedure "User" and "User2" will be used. Now, Log in as User2 Open the file manager ...


1

A particular flavor of top that we use here is htop. Still CLI based but much more 'graphical'. Install it with: sudo apt-get install htop


2

I believe that per-subvolume compression is not available yet. From the BTRFS wiki: Most mount options apply to the whole filesystem, and only the options for the first subvolume to be mounted will take effect. This is due to lack of implementation and may change in the future. This means that (for example) you can't set per-subvolume nodatacow, ...


0

I solved the performance issue. It was quite simple: Got myself 2x2GB RAM, put it into the computer, voila. It now has 6GB of memory and seems to be happy about it. dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/Media/testfile.out bs=1M count=10000 10000+0 records in 10000+0 records out 10485760000 bytes (10 GB) copied, 33.828 s, 310 MB/s dd ...


1

Since Raring (13.04), perf is built without Python scripting enabled “to avoid a Python build dependency”. This came as a nasty shock to people like me who used perf in 12.04 LTS and upgraded to 14.04 LTS. This is documented in the debian-master/changelog file in the Ubuntu kernel git repos. In short, if your kernel is 3.8.0-6.11 or later, you are — to use ...


0

You can install a CPU frequence controller with this command: sudo apt-get install indicator-cpufreq Then reboot, go to the notification area (the right side of the top panel), click on the cpu frequence indicator and then select Performance.


-1

I would just like to add to this that I have noticed a significant performance decrease in my Windows 7 after repartitioning my Windows drive to create space for Ubuntu, although I did screw around with the partitioning quite a bit (created partition to install Ubuntu to, had some issues, repartitioned, more issues) before actually installing Ubuntu to ...


1

boot performance under systemd can be measured with the systemd-analyze plot tool. Realize that Ubuntu running systemd is very similar to Debian, which is very similar to every other GNU/Linux distro.


0

Couple points: increase swap use openbox or blackbox destktop environments as super-light-weight alternatives (my ram usage with it right now is around 700 MB , no flash running) limit startup scripts, processes, etc. Use a usb as RAM: refer here or here


1

As long as the program we are talking about is not a service (examples of those are mysql, apache) it will not impede on the speed of your system. And even those services tend to be rather quiet when not actively used. The only benefit you will see is that there is less to update where there are updates. But that is not worth all the trouble tracking down ...



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