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0

Well, Ubuntu 14.04 is quite more resource intensive than many previous releases. I think with your specs, you are pushing the envelope when it comes to speed. I've used an Acer Aspire One (with the N455 Atom) the only problems I had were incompatibilities with with the Intel GMA. Ubuntu also runs a lot better with a minimum of 2GB of RAM. Also, even though ...


1

After struggling with ondemand for a while, I will share how to permanently disable it in Ubuntu and its derivates. Install cpufrequtils: sudo apt-get install cpufrequtils Then edit the following file (if it doesn't exist, create it): sudo nano /etc/default/cpufrequtils And add the following line to it: GOVERNOR="performance" Save and ...


0

Try this: gksu gedit /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_governor Replace ondemand with performance. Repeat for every core (increase cpu0: cpu1, cpu2). If you get save errors, use nano editor: sudo nano /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_governor Source: Avoiding CPU Speed Scaling – Running CPU At Full Speed


5

Sounds like the connection might be maxing it out. You say it's an older computer so it likely has IDE or sata 1 which means 150 MBs is the best you could expect mathematically. Remember sata 1 is 1.5GBs raw, but only 150mbs usable, sata 2 is 3GBs raw 300mbs usable, and sata 3 is 6GBs raw 600MBs usable. Real world you're exactly where you should be for ...


2

Just do: sudo apt-get install gnome-session-fallback Reboot and select your Gnome by clicking the Ubuntu sign before logging in. I think Gnome Metacity might be the right choice for you.


0

I run Ubuntu inside Virtualbox which has its own set of performance concerns. You are running native so I would suggest looking at these two steps from this post http://www.binarytides.com/better-xubuntu-14-04/ Speed up the user interface Create a file named .gtkrc-2.0 in your home directory and paste in the following lines ...


1

Sounds like an issue with your GPU drivers. Search for 'Additional Drivers' in Unity, and see what comes up. The propiatary drivers, while not GNU, would run a lot better.


1

There is a resource usage I made a couple of days ago which I mentioned in one of your posts, in a graph it would look like this: The source for both graphs is from What is the difference between Ubuntu and its derivatives? and as mentioned in there, they should be taken lightly, because they can vary. While I was doing the tests I noticed the ...


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You can use lsof (man lsof). The following will return a list of all files that are open for writing: lsof | grep -e "[[:digit:]]\+w"


0

Test this: Press and hold Shift when Ubuntu is booting Select Recovery mode from Advanced Options Select from Submenu fsck clean root In a terminal. Run it: dpkg --purge `COLUMNS=300 dpkg -l | egrep "^rc" | cut -d' ' -f3` apt-get autoremove apt-get clean


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You should be able to boot into recovery mode. This is a special mode where you log in as root, have only a terminal, and start with read-only access to the drive (which you can then convert to read-write access). Follow the instructions here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/RecoveryMode In particular, press and hold Shift when Ubuntu is booting, select Recovery ...


0

Install hardinfo which gives benchmark information as shown below screen-shot: sudo apt-get install hardinfo


0

The question is about using an SD card to store frequently accessed files caching these in de SD card instead of the pagefile... That's Windows stuff in fact. Windows uses a special algorythm amd compression to do that. However: Even in our "beloved" MS operating system ReadyBoost does only provide a very limited improvement on realtively up to date hardware ...


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The only difference between the different flavours of Ubuntu is the installed desktop. The basic minimum system requirements of several Ubuntu desktop respins is already covered in this question: What are the system requirements for each flavour of Ubuntu Desktop? To address your list: memory usage: See Memory consumption of Linux desktop environments ...


0

To minimize your video incongruity, you can install another graphical interface. I recommend KDE or MATE for beautiful graphics, and LDXE or Razor-Qt for better performance. In your terminal use: KDE: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install kubuntu-desktop MATE: (for programs belong family GNOME) sudo add-apt-repository "deb ...


0

The "problem" is with your video card, it does not do 3d graphics. To compensate it uses llvm which uses your CPU rather then your video card to do 3d rendering. The result is your display is slow. Previous versions of unity and gnome did had a 2d fall back mode, but they have been phased out. "gnome" - both gnome shell and unity - use llvm (llvmpipe) and ...


0

According to UpstartCookBook: With Upstart 0.6.7, to stop Upstart automatically starting a job, you can either: - Rename the job configuration file such that it does not end with ".conf". - Edit the job configuration file and comment out the "start on" stanza using a leading '#'. To re-enable the job, just undo the change. ...


0

Go to the dock and search for Startup Applications. The GUI is very simple and you can remove programs from the list to stop them from automatically starting. Only remove programs that you know are not essential.


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I discovered the following bug in Virtualbox : https://www.virtualbox.org/ticket/11606


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Try using Xubuntu, which is an official Ubuntu derivative that uses the more lightweight Xfce desktop environment. I did and it really works good! :)


1

I have solution. Open firefox and type into url - "about:config" (without "") and press enter. After what, on the page that appears with the warning, click the "I promise I'll be careful!" (or another "promise" :)). On opened page with mozilla settings looked for a "dom.ipc.plugins.enabled" (without "") (use the filter on top). All founded options set ...


0

This could be caused by the fact that your harddisk has some bad blocks. I would recommend you to boot from the USB stick again and run the following command from a terminal: sudo fsck -c /dev/sdb6 This will add those bad blocks to the bad block list, meaning that they should not be used any more. Another option is to run gparted and trigger a check of ...


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The time is spend doing work The command does not hang or wait for something wasting time, it actually does work that takes time; It most probably takes time by adding up multiple small network delays. But it could also be that there are delays on the youtube side, that add up. That it just the time it takes to download the HTML that is needed; The command ...


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Would you consider using Lubuntu (Ubuntu using lxde) instead of Ubuntu on your laptop? Another alternate would be xfce desktop. After all struggle with different versions of Ubuntu, I came to this solution for low CPU usage, use a distro with light desktop or just install xfce or lxde on your current distro and use that desktop instead.



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