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I wouldn't recommend keeping your swappiness very high if you're using an SSD. SSDs have a limited number of writes before they wear down, so using them as RAM can shorter their lifespan.


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I've had this problem on 14.04 - 16.04 (as of today). To solve it I had to force Ubuntu to ignore the bios limiting. The following worked for me: Open grub: sudo vim /etc/default/grub Replace GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT line: - GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" + GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash intel_pstate=disable ...


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According to some CPU's like mine (Core i7-3630QM ) prolonged usage of full perfomance can lead to slower OS startup and it's programs(it performs overlocking while launching programs) - maybe that's one of major keys of "Perfomance mode" usage. UPDATE:there has to be script that sets frequency for a certain Ghz... Unfortunately i cant remember how it calls ...


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My advice to you is to use an SSD 32/64 GB for your /boot and / partitions and an HDD for /home. You can either buy an mSATA SSD (if your laptop supports it) or a 2.5" SATA SSD. In the second case you will need replace one of the drives with your CD-ROM. This is how I run my laptop for 3 years and I have no issues so far. :)


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According to the nvidia page, GTX 970 gets support for vulcan. Like that you should be able to have the same, or even better performance under linux ... at least for games which make use of vulcan: https://developer.nvidia.com/vulkan-driver Not sure if these are the same drivers than the ones provided in the ubuntu non-feee repo .. best check the versions. ...


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I have one HDD and two Hybrid drives and there is a huge difference in read and access times: Hybrid drives are the middle ground between HDD and However, SSDs suffer from a type of failure rate where the drive could crash and die: no lost boot sectors; just dead. Being a memory based drive it suffer memory kinks like a static discharge or a power outage. ...


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Be sure to use the Proprietary NVIDIA drivers instead of the open source nouveau. You can switch this in the Update Center: Now that I made this whole guide I realize this might actually not be a solution to your problem after all, as I misread that you are not new to Ubuntu. I still hope you or someone find their way with it. lol


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At first you have to know what is causing this slows. You can monitor if your cpu is not excessive loaded: watch "ps aux --sort -pcpu | head -11" This will monitor every default 2s top 10 consuming cpu processes. You can send it to log file for further investigation with a little tee help: watch "ps aux --sort -pcpu | head -11 | tee -a logfile" In ...


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If you have a fast cpu, try Zram. You can read about it in detail here.


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If you have an HDD, try the CFQ I/O scheduler. Here's how to do it: sudo -H gedit /etc/default/grub Change: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" to: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash elevator=cfq" Then run: sudo update-grub For more explanation google "enable cfq in ubuntu".


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Once data goes into swap, it is normal for it to stay there even once your memory starts to free up again. It is a good thing and there is no need for concern. Due to hard disk access being significantly slower than memory, your system will avoid swapping data in or out of swap when it doesn't think it is necessary for system performance or stability. So, ...


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The slowness will quickly clear up on its own as the swapped out data is brought back in when it is needed. It won't be swapped out again as long as you have plenty of free ram, but plenty of other data that you have not accessed might still remain in swap, waiting for you to actually need it again.



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