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I'd just use Arch linux; you can set up your OS as you see fit. Don't waste your time making more commercial systems work for you.


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You can only boot one operating system at a time! If you boot only one operating system all the time, it will remain preloaded in RAM memory, thus booting faster. When you switch from one OS to the other, the RAM memory is erased and the other OS is loaded into RAM, thus longer boot time might occur (like in a first time boot, a.k.a. cold boot). The ...


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No, you should not experience a decrease in performance The only thing that is negatively-impacted by running a dual-boot is your drive space. While this may have other side effects that may cause a decrease in performance, it is not necessarily caused by a dual-boot specific performance decrease. Disregarding drive space, you will not be experiencing any ...


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As long as Ubuntu is running on dual-boot, as opposed to in a virtual machine, the only system resource Windows will take up when you're in Ubuntu is hard disk space. As long as you have enough space available for the Ubuntu OS (20 GB is adequate, 30 GB is better), swap (2x RAM) and /home (as big as you'll need for your storage and tarball installs), it ...


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Disable the second graphics card. In our setup this had a massive impact on performance and stability


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If you're not willing to install Vulkan's beta drivers manually (which I don't recommend you doing anyways) you can try out this which appears to be a PPA that includes Vulkan. At the moment I believe that Vulkan is in a beta stage and your improvements might be considered negligible in additional consideration that you may have some system instability.


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Indeed, your system is too old to run the standard version of Ubuntu, with Unity. The main problem is that your graphics card is not good enough - Ubuntu needs a fairly good graphics card. The result is that instead of actually using your graphics card, Ubuntu does everything on the CPU, which is very slow. That's why you're seeing "Gallium 0.4 iivmpipe" as ...


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Try with the alternate-version, that is optimized for older machines. Of course 2GB RAM is low memory. Or try an older Ubuntu, maybe Ubuntu 14.10 64 bit. I dont know what do you want to do with this laptop, if you want only internet surfing maybe Puppy Linux is the best. There is also Lubuntu-Netbook 14.10 to try that requires less memory and cpu usage.


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It is a very long standing and known problem of the website (Google Docs), that goes across browsers and OSs. They know it, but form the look of it I'd say that they are not working on it.


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Tell Ubuntu to use more RAM to speed up the process Ubuntu does not control what the applications you're using do with available memory, the applications themselves do. So you'd need to find some way to tell the application you're using that it shold use more memory. However, most applications only use as much memory as they actually need - using more isn'...


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Check running processes and RAM usage by running top command in a terminal. Check it using a text mode console (Ctrl+Alt+F1) if you believe the slowness is related to Xorg/GUI. And BTW, you could have installed valgrind from the ubuntu repositories (sudo apt-get install valgrind, or using the software center), instead of compiling it by yourself, would be a ...


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It works fine with SSD which supports TRIM for 16.04 there is no fstrim-all simple fstrim does not have --no-model-check and it works fine with sandisk ssd


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I figured out that on my laptop with NVIDIA 8600M GS graphics and proprietary nvidia-340 driver package, compiz was always using all the CPU it could get from a single core. With no other activity on my computer, this means a value close to 100% on one core, while the other takes care of all the other loads. Top also reports nearly 100% for compiz itself. ...


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Wow, that sounds pretty bad. It sounds almost like you are in limited graphics mode or something. (I'm not suggesting you are.) Use this Firefox extension to get the mobile versions of websites. Mobile versions are typically much more lightweight. If you're a Chrome user, use this. There are also lots of other alternatives that do the same. Also, use ...


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VIA graphic cards are really weird. I guess your trouble has something to do with the graphic part. Try to replace the VIA card with a Radeon or a nVidia. Even a super old one could do better than VIA. Or LXDE/Lubuntu is too much for your laptop. Try a micro linux (Puppy, Slax, DamnSmallLinux, etc). Firefox is the T-Rex of all browsers. Don't use that on old ...


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I would try in that order: Check your raw internet speed: download some big file (~10MB or more) using wget/curl. If this is not what you expect, check your connection to your router (Wifi can be slow if there is a lot of channel crossover). Check your swap usage, when you use the browser, a system with more that 5% swap gets slow See if disabling ...


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In YouTube you can reduce quality from the gear icon in its user interface. You could also try lowering display resolution in Monitor Settings.


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Pop into terminal and type: sudo gedit /etc/sysctl.conf ... and add this line to the end: vm.swappiness = 15 ... which will tell your system to use physical memory instead of virtual and speed up your desktop. The default is 60 which is too high and relies on virtual memory more which can cause slowdown after a time. Reboot after change.


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I do not have the privileges to comment, so I post. In the past the kerneloops daemon was innocuous because multi-user could precede (aesthetically anyways) to the login screen. However due to the migration to SystemD this daemon triggers the network-online.service. I don't know about you... but I have never seen a commercial DHCP service with low ...


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Your friend is wrong - Ubuntu can utilize all your hardware perfectly well. If you want to play games, or do other video intensive tasks, you may want to install Nvidia's driver's for your graphics card. See this question for details. (However, the open source drivers which ship with Ubuntu will probably be fine - meaning that Ubuntu will work well right ...


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Typically, no, though in some instances if a hard drive is close to max capacity it can take slightly longer to find data. But XP is an old OS designed for older computers with less RAM and slower processing speeds. If your computer was designed for XP, then your problem is probably with RAM or processing speed. You have a few options. One is to install ...


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The position of data on a rotational device does make some difference to the speed of I/O transfer. The data rate depends on the track, so it will be higher on the outer tracks (more data sectors per track), lower on the inner tracks (fewer data sectors per track). As a partition gets very near to full it is probably harder for the file system to make use ...


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Partition size does not effect the performance of the computer, unless if you maxed out your partition space with too many files. But that is not the case. Since you are running an old, Windows XP device, it might not be able to meet the recommended hardware requirements of whatever version of Ubuntu you are running. A RAM upgrade should more than suffice. ...



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