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Unfortunately the UUIDs and labels of the file system inside encrypted containers are inaccessible due to encryption and TrueCrypt/VeraCrypt containers don't carry UUIDs or labels on their own (or at least none that udev knows about as opposed to those of LUKS containers). There's one other sufficiently stable identifier for storage volumes in Linux: disk ...


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Actually this is a great question for Unix & Linux because it is not only related to Ubuntu. There is a really nice answer on SuperUser which describes the Difference between .bashrc, .bash_profile and .profile. The accepted answer explains this pretty well. Here are some relevant parts from that answer: Bash is a Bourne-like shell. It reads ...


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This is due to the fact that you have t defined as an alias (or a function), you can find it using the type builtin: type -a t Aliases, functions (and other shell builtins) take precedence over external executables. To run the executable t from your PATH, do: 't' Or "t" Or \t Note that, just t is not a good name for a file.


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I don't know why you would want to do this but to fix it just copy your command scripts from /bin to your new path. REMEMBER these commands may work from their default directory and if you move them they might not find something and have a paddy, so be careful! Hope this helps


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To restore your PATH to a sane default, do PATH=$(getconf PATH) This is a problem with your PATH: -sh: 1: id: not found This is a problem with your code: -sh: 12: [: Illegal number: Share your profile for extra help


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Use your command with the full path, like /bin/ls /bin/dir /bin/rm /bin/mv /usr/bin/vi


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In short, .desktop file's Icon= path understands absolute paths, but not tilde expansion, because of the specification which defines how .desktop files are supposed to work. Tilde expansion Where you would see tilde (~) expansion to the $HOME environment variable is often for example in bash, which is the usual login shell you interact with on the command ...


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The use of paths in a .desktop file In a .desktop file, you need to use absolute and full paths. Therefore ~ is not expanded. This is a commonly made mistake :) Exceptions concerning icons are a.o. described here: Icon to display in file manager, menus, etc. If the name is an absolute path, the given file will be used. If the name is not an absolute ...


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The file ~/.profile is being ignored by the shell if a file ~/.bash_profile or ~/.bash_login exists. First check if these files exists. If not, this was not the problem.



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