Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

59

Discussion regarding this specific patch took place on the Ubuntu kernel-team mailing list: https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/kernel-team/2010-November/013498.html But let me try to elaborate even more generically about the best way for any patch to make it's way into the Ubuntu kernel... First, it's the preferred policy of the Ubuntu Kernel Team that ...


44

You can use apt-get to install a specific version of the package a long as it is in an archive that apt knows about. From the apt-get manpage: A specific version of a package can be selected for installation by following the package name with an equals and the version of the package to select. This will cause that version to be located and selected ...


20

I've just read the lkml thread and hope I can offer some information - although not about getting the patch into Ubuntu. As a post on the linked Ubuntu list says, it's probably going to be in 2.6.38 anyway. The patch automatically groups process based on TTYs. There is a lot of discussion/argument on the lkml that says this means it isn't relevant for ...


14

You're pretty close with your example steps, but here's what I'd suggest: Grab the sources with apt-get source wine and cd into the new directory Find what sort of patch system the wine package is based on: what-patch; in this case, it tells us we that the wine package uses quilt for patch management Since we're using quilt, add your custom patch(es) to ...


14

First thanks for all the bug work you've done up until now. Its great that you'd like to get involved with fixing this bug! The best way is to report a new bug against precise, and make it clear that it is a regression caused by LP:#600941. Give it the tag 'regression-updates'. It would also be good to mention it in the comments of LP:#600941, so that users ...


12

As Dobey mentioned, in order for a patch to be accepted into an already released version of Ubuntu, it must got through the Stable Release Update (SRU) process. The bar to entry for SRUs is quite high. A simple way to sum up the thinking behind the process might be: "The bug we know is better than the bug we don't know about." In practice, that means that ...


12

How can Ubuntu users get this in a way that's supported? Emphasis mine. The only way you'll get it in a supported way is by waiting for Ubuntu to pull it into the Ubuntu kernel. As this is really just making it to the kernel mailing list, it's fresh to the point where all testing is fairly anecdotal and I imagine it will be some time before it's ready ...


9

Is it a Launchpad project? (If you already know that it is a Launchpad project, you can skip this.) Not all projects found on Launchpad are actually hosted and developed there - some are mirrors of code hosted elsewhere (GitHub/Gitorious/etc), others come from Debian. These original sources are known as "upstream" projects, and it is usually best to submit ...


7

To quickly generate new packages with your patch applied, run the following in a gnome-terminal: sudo apt-get install build-dep indicator-applet sudo apt-get install devscripts apt-get source indicator-applet cd indicator-applet-<version-string> cp /path/to/patch/indicator.patch . patch --dry-run -p1 < indicator.patch Continue only if that ...


6

The famous "200 lines patch" will not improve the performance of your computer. However it may improve your user experience while having your computer heavily loaded : it improves the responsiveness of your desktop. You could find some information at Phoronix. There are also already compiled kernels available for Ubuntu 10.10 here but I recommend NOT ...


5

This usually depends on the type of patch system which the package uses. There are 3 types of patch systems for Debian packages: Quilt (most widely used) Cdbs + Simple Patchsys dpatch All patch systems store patches in debian/patches. You can use the what-patch command in package ubuntu-dev-tools to find out which patch system a package is using. ...


5

The proper way to do this is to first make sure that the package uses a patch system, and if it doesn't set it up to use Quilt. There should be answers on this site for how to do that. Then, create a new version of the package using dch -i. Add your changes (such as use of a patch system) to the changelog, add your patch into the patch system, and then ...


5

You can use a simple "hack" posted by a RedHat developer on a mailing list, that doesn't require patching the kernel to get the same thing. Read about it here: Alternative To The "200 Lines Kernel Patch That Does Wonders" Which You Can Use Right Away


5

The Ubuntu kernel doesn't use Debian packaging to apply patches to the kernel source, the way most Debian packages do. In terms of Debian packaging, there's a whole new upstream tarball for each kernel release. This is done because the Ubuntu kernel team uses git to maintain kernel changes. This aligns us with upstream kernel practices and is more ...


5

Once a new version of Ubuntu is released, all of the patches which have been released since the disk images were made will not be incorporated into them the next time you download them. The disk images made available for download at ubuntu.com are pretty much final. Instead, the patches are meant to be applied after installation by running updates, much like ...


4

The LiveCD images for an Ubuntu version which is still in beta/development get updated on a daily basis in its daily live images. For instance, you can get an up-to-date development version of upcoming Ubuntu 12.10 here. The LiveCD for a version is not update once it is released as final. Then, updates are only pushed through the Update Manager. For an LTS ...


4

You need to remove cdrom from sources.list either manualy or with software-properties-gtk program. Just launch it and uncheck corresponding checkboxes.


4

You need to download the source. You can do this via apt-src but I would (personally) just grab the latest from kernel.org, extract it, patch it (just using local paths like the desktop, it doesn't need to be hidden in /usr/src at all!) and follow the "old fashioned way" instructions for compiling it. Note that some patches are only for certain versions of ...


4

There are a couple ways to do this. You can install ubiquity and edit the code on your machine (in /usr/lib/ubiquity/*). Then just run it and play around. It will adjust some global machine settings, so be prepared for your language or keyboard to change as you select values. And remember you probably don't want to repartition your hard drive as you're ...


4

In order to build from a bazaar branch, the command you are looking for is bzr builddeb or bzr builddeb -S for a source package. This is part of the bzr-builddeb package. For further information you should check out the Ubuntu Distributed Development documentation and bzr-builddeb's documentation located at: ...


4

No. The supported method for getting updates is to wait for them to be available via Update Manager (which uses the software repositories) or a new Ubuntu version. You are perfectly free to try this out, but you should know exactly what you are doing.


3

Read the Patches to Packages section in the Packaging Guide, for a better understanding how it works you should read the entire guide.


3

The Ubuntu Packaging Guide has all the information how to package for Ubuntu including howto deal with patches.


3

In open source projects, why do software patches have to be accepted by a developer? This is because distros contain only one version of one piece of software. If your patch is accepted by the developer, he/she will release it which will make it's way to the end user. Couldn't contributors just release their own patches and allow people to add the patch ...


3

Practically speaking, this isn't possible because the old versions are not kept in the archive, so unless you have a copy of the old version laying around somewhere, you can't install it. You should be asking yourself why you want to install an older version in the first place. On a stable release, the main reason for a new version being released is to ...


3

If you click on the "Patch" link you can then save the patch as a .diff file and apply it against trunk. You can get a copy of gphoto's working trunk with svn co https://gphoto.svn.sourceforge.net/svnroot/gphoto gphoto Applying the patch is something akin to this command: patch -p1 < gphoto.diff (Note: I haven't actually tried this, but I believe ...


3

Install xmacro (sudo apt-get install xmacro) Create a file called "myxmacro" and give it the following content: Code: MotionNotify 90 90 MotionNotify 120 120 3. Create a file "no.idle.sh" and make it executable: Code: touch no.idle.sh chmod +x no.idle.sh 4.4. Create a file "no.idle.sh" and make it executable: Code: touch no.idle.sh chmod +x ...


3

It would require a Stable Release Update to ship it to 12.04. See https://wiki.ubuntu.com/StableReleaseUpdates for acceptable types of fixes, and procedure for getting them in.


3

I have just downloaded the version 9.0.1. The problem is solved for me in this latest version. Try installing it!


2

The RevoDrives rely on so called "FakeRAID" to run. They work just fine but require you to install dmraid package before Ubuntu can use it. To install upon it, this basically requires you to: Run "Try Ubuntu" first. You can't skip straight to installation. Open a terminal and run sudo apt-get install dmraid. Then run the installer. It should detect the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible