New answers tagged

1

Nice one-liner to remove sudo prompts for the current user sudo bash -c 'echo "$(logname) ALL=(ALL:ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL" | (EDITOR="tee -a" visudo)'


0

The only workaround that I am aware of is to select the "Forget password immediately" option while logging into the server. It showld be a radio button right beneath the username/password fill form. That way when you unmount the device, you will be able to login again as the same ot different user.


-1

It's pretty obvious that your user is not in the sudo group. You didn't provide any additional information like, are you the only user of that computer? If you are not, then ask/use a sudo account to add your account to the sudo group. However, it's also possible that there are no sudo users on your system at all (pretty rare). If you have accidentally ...


-1

As indicated in the other answers, you need to be in the sudoers group. If you are, the sudo password is the same as your login password.


0

I am guessing your account doesn't possess superuser privileges. You cannot recover password from terminal by any command. If you need to do perform any administrative tasks, you should consider contacting your IT support for the root access. Also, you might want to edit the description of your question to make it look more professional.


0

Boot from ubuntu cd, mount your root partition, chroot into root partition an change your passwords. 1 boot live cd 2 open terminal 3 sudo -s 4 mount /dev/sda1 /mnt , if sda1 is your root partition. 5 chroot /mnt 6 passwd root New password New password 7 passwd youruser New password New password 8 exit 9 umount /mnt 10 reboot


0

On the remote machine type sudo passwd This will allow you to set the root password on the remote pc. You can then type on your local machine ssh-copy-id root@remotepc After which you will be prompted with a password prompt where you will enter the password you created earlier. From then on when you type ssh root@remotepc You will not be prompted ...


0

Looks like this this question may provide an answer. I need to "log in as root using sudo -s then use passwd command to set root password." SOLUTION: I used sudo su - root and passwd which worked.However this lead to a permission denied error when trying ssh -l root slave3 , subject of a new question.


1

No, you cannot prevent root from changing your password. The root user has full control of the system, and if someone can log in as root, they can change your password. Likewise, if another user has access to sudo, you cannot prevent them from changing your password. You can protect your data by encrypting your home folder. Users who can use sudo (or log ...


0

ssh-copy-id is not magic! # where is ssh-copy-id? $ type -p ssh-copy-id /usr/bin/ssh-copy-id # What is ssh-copy-id? $ file $( !! ) file $( type -p ssh-copy-id ) /usr/bin/ssh-copy-id: POSIX shell script, ASCII text executable Next, you need to read ssh-copy-id, find out what ssh-copy-id does, and find alternate ways to accomplish the same tasks. If a shell ...


1

You had a NOPASSWD rule applied to your user in some file in /etc/sudoers.d. Use sudo grep NOPASSWD /etc/sudoers.d -R to find out which. Your /etc/sudoers is not the default, however. The default sudoers can be obtained by looking at the sudo package: $ apt-get download sudo Get:1 http://mirror.cse.iitk.ac.in/ubuntu xenial-updates/main amd64 sudo amd64 1.8....


0

Upgrade to the latest BTsync. Answer from BTsync support There is no default password, usually you need to set it login and password first Delete btsync-cache files if you do not remember your password if you want to start a new account.


0

Ubuntu 16.04 has disabled dsa keys and now only accepts rsa keys. This got me too, but fortunately I had password access still enabled. You can add Host * PubkeyAcceptedKeyTypes=+ssh-dss to ~/.ssh/config, or switch to rsa keys. Once you get in...


1

Edit your sudoers file using sudo visudo. Find this line: Defaults env_reset and change it to this: Defaults env_reset,timestamp_timeout=0 This forces sudo to ask for a password every time your run it.


0

I would say the easiest way to do this would be to use Enigmail. Just install it and follow the instructions. Quoting your link: Thunderbird Thunderbird supports OpenPGP through the enigmail plugin. Enigmail is available in the "Main" repository. sudo apt-get install enigmail Configure OpenPGP support in Thunderbird under Enigmail->...


1

The only possible solution which comes in my mind is to crack it by brute force. Rarcrack works with RAR and 7z as well. Look at this page: Rarcrack To be honest, if you set very long password or/and have slow computer, it may take days to crack.


2

FYI: unlocking a Kingston SSD by use of hdparm, after setting a user password appears to be impossible. NOTE: The drive will appear as locked next time you reboot after setting your password. Until then, security will only appear as enabled. Whether trying the very user-password you just set, or other variants, such as "", "NULL", NULL or a row of 32 ...


0

This rule should be sufficient to achieve passwordless restart of network manager. However: Do you run command exactly as you wrote it in sudoers file? For example you can not omit .service part unless your sudo rule looks like this: %sudo ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: /bin/systemctl restart network-manager* Does sudo --list command output includes your command?...


0

Finally I have been able to solve my problem. In terminal you have to type: systemctl start mysql.service systemctl enable mysql.service /usr/bin/mysql_secure_installation That's it all done


4

Instead of doing su root, you should use sudo instead, as the root account is not enabled by default in Ubuntu, and will not work. This is why you are getting an "Authentication failure" message. Regarding password entry - it won't show you anything as you type, but, it will accept your password after you press enter. Make sure you entered the right ...


1

The --security-erase option presumes a drive that has already been locked with that password. I infer from your previous question that you just want a secure destruction of everything on the disk. This is how I do that: sudo su - cat /dev/urandom > /dev/sda Now wait (quite) a while for the "out of space" error. Disk sda is wiped, and very securely ...


0

use expect .Expect lets you automate user interaction on shell(entering password, ssh...).There you can find some examples that suit your needs. Expect examples


1

I found this simple script to get the job done: #!/bin/bash # Script to add a user to Linux system if [ $(id -u) -eq 0 ]; then read -p "Enter username : " username read -s -p "Enter password : " password egrep "^$username" /etc/passwd >/dev/null if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then echo "$username exists!" exit 1 else pass=$(...


0

Ugly fix: remove gnome-keyring execute privilege. chmod -x /usr/bin/gnome-keyring-daemon After this, gnome-keyring-daemon will not make any Chrome issue anymore, but it will not save any system password (google chrome password will be saved and you can used saved one too).


1

This will give you the password for your current connection. sudo grep psk= /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/* Or sudo grep psk= /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/(YOUR-SSID)


-1

I have faced the same problem with installing Ubuntu 16.04 and I solved it by changing the password and removing any parentheses in my password and I have used only characters and numbers and dots to separate between the characters. Now I am longing to my root account with full permission.


1

Here's how to fix it: Press Ctrl+Alt+F1. Then you will be greeted by a terminal prompt. Now type in the terminal: sudo apt-get remove gnome-do This will remove gnome-do and your login problem is now fixed. To reboot, type: sudo shutdown -r now That's it! You should be able to login into your account without any problems.


1

I wasn't able to recreate this issue but as Bharadwaj Raju suggested you can use Ctrl ALT F1 to enter a terminal then remove gnome-do .. then once booted back in, if you want to use the program still .. you can install it and run it then click the triangle in the upper right and select preferences. In the general tab select Hide window on first launch (quiet ...


1

This is a known Bug, see here I looked through some of the comments and there are a few proposed workarounds. Remove the account: Not really a solution. Nevertheless: Go to Settings, Accounts, select the perpetrator and click on remove. A notable alternative E-Mail client is Thunderbird. Set the period for checking for new mail: Go to Settings, Accounts, ...


1

Turn on your device, then hold down the "shift" key. You will be greeted by the "grub" menu. Then select the second option on the screen: Now, you will see a menu with these options: Select the "root" option. Then you will be greeted by a root prompt that looks like this: root@ubuntu:~# Now type: mount -rw -o remount / Then type: root@ubuntu:~# ...


0

Boot your computer, and at the grub menu, select "Advanced options", then at the next screen, select the top option with "(recovery mode)" next to it. At the recovery menu, select "root". Change your file system to read-write by typing mount -rw -o remount / If you forgot your username, type in cd /home and then ls. This will list the contents of the /...


5

This is in fact the same password you use when you login your user. Make sure you not have Caps-Lock activated and so on. Unless you messed something up greatly this should work. You should be even able to switch to the super-user by using sudo su, sudo -i and such commands, which is not recommended because in this case you forfeit the security layer which ...



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