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-1

For Russian-speaking. Для русскоговорящих. Подобную проблему я решил почти 5 лет назад, вот запись с картинками в моем блоге: Пароль для связки ключей I solved this problem about 5 years ago, the link points to my blog post (in Russian) with explanations.


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You should be able to use the password for the keyring you set for your user account at install. The password you use to log in to your account if you had auto login off.


-1

I think the answer should be the same to the problem like this in ubuntu. Here is the link How can I stop being prompted to unlock the 'default' keyring on boot? Hope this helps. Please vote if it helps:)


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Your ISP is asking you to login to your SMTP server so that you can respond to a return receipt request.


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You can use the gnome keyring plugin, as the name describes it only works with the Gnome Keyring. You can build it from source: https://github.com/aebrahim/pidgin-gnome-keyring Or use a PPA: https://launchpad.net/~pidgin-gnome-keyring/+archive/ubuntu/ppa This is a still valid post that describes how it works and how to install it: ...


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What I did was go into the network manager settings by clicking the wifi/network icon in the taskbar > Settings icon, and then from the networks screen that appears I right-clicked my connection, clicked edit, and then under the "General configuration" tab, ticked the "All users may connect to this network" check box. When I restarted my computer I wasn't ...


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Boot into a root shell: How do I boot into a root shell? Then change the password for your user (ubuntu) sudo passwd <username> Or create a new user sudo adduser <username>


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Not positive, but seems to be the same as: I bug goo.gl/XTAkQG this too, goo.gl/Kds4va – Stephen Allen Apr 3 at 11:45 And another one which shows the dialogue asking for prompt: goo.gl/13LIMH So it seems to be a regression in both Debian and Ubuntu. :( – Stephen Allen Apr 3 at 11:56


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You can try using ecryptfs-recover-private. Boot into your live CD, preferably an Ubuntu one of a newer version Mount the partition containing your home directory (either your root partition, or your /home partition if you have one) In your terminal, navigate to the directory containing your home directory (should be something like ...


0

Sounds like your Xserver died because of some corrupted configuration file in your /home directory. I suggest you reboot in recovery mode, check the filesystem, do a cleaup, and then, reboot and try again. If it still doesn't work, reboot recovery, command line as root, and create a new user, reboot and try to see if with that user works. If it works, then ...


0

Press Ctrl + Alt + F1 then login there - does it allow you to? Also, I assume you changed the password by doing (<username> replaced by your username): passwd <username>


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Use: vipw I have always used this on FreeBSD and just confirmed you can use it for Ubuntu too. Please read this page: Ubuntu Man Page for vipw


-4

procedure for changing your username (but not uid) by hand: have your head examined, when that fails proceed to step two. edit shadow file duplicating the user line with new username. edit groups, sudoers, allowing new username permissions, keep old symbolically link home directory to new name edit passwd file changing username and home directory edit ...


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The reason you got stuck after your edit is that the /etc/shadow file contained an entry for the password of tiny but no entry for abc, whereas the /etc/passwd file contained an entry for abc and not for tiny. When sudo looked, it identified you correctly (according to the password file) as abc based on the UID of the process you were running, but when it ...


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You must NEVER edit your passwd file manually because you will mess things up. The proper way to change your username is: usermod -l newUsername oldUsername Then change home folder: usermod -d /home/newHomeDir -m newUsername To change password you should use: sudo passwd yourusername I suggest you to revert your passwd file back, or if you can't ...


0

If you are logged in to a cloud instance with a shared key - you can likely prefix the last command with sudo: sudo python setup.py install alternatively, you can install boto from the built-in package management system, with the command sudo apt-get install python-boto while the latest version is not part of the apt-get package system, it will be ...


1

"By default the first user's account is an administrative account, so if the UI is prompting you for a password it's probably that person's user password.If the user doesn't remember their password you need to reset it. To do this you need to boot into recovery mode." Quoted from How do I reset a lost administrative password?


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Your account probably is in the nopasswdlogin group. Enter this command: sudo gpasswd -d $USER nopasswdlogin (Enter it just the way it is. No need to replace anything.)


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By default, you should have a line like this in /etc/pam.d/common-password: password [success=1 default=ignore] pam_unix.so obscure sha512 try_first_pass Remove obscure and add minlen=1 (or whatever rules you want): password [success=1 default=ignore] pam_unix.so sha512 try_first_pass minlen=1 With this, you can set the password to be very simple, like a ...


0

I ran into a situation with Kubuntu 14.04.1 I got "incorrect password" error on the X session, but when I switched to console it turned out that my password is expired so I have to set a new one. I have no clue why I wasn't allowed to log in and offered to change the password on GUI, Or at least warned about it.


1

NEVER use the same username/email - password combination for more than one service! I advise you to change all of them immediately. Not only because it is unsafe in general, but because weird popup password requests look somehow suspicious to me. It could be malware prompting you for your credentials to hack your accounts. It does not have to be, but it ...


0

It doesn't do anything that you wouldn't be able to do by booting up with a live USB drive. In other words, it gets you into the file system, which you can anyway do in a number of ways. If you wanted to improve security, you'd need to encrypt the harddrive, which is an option. There sometimes are ways to lock down the boot in the bios, but I wouldn't ...


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Try changing password or turning on/off Automatic Login. If it wouldn't work I think you need to report a bug.


0

Change the passowrd in recovery shell and set up the auto-login for lightdm greeter (aka login screen) 1) When you boot, go to "Advanced options for Ubuntu" and select recovery mode 2) Once you see the menu bellow, select root shell, execute the following command mount -o rw,remount /. Next, change your password with passwd username, where username is ...


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Here's couple of suggestions you could try through either command line or grub -> Advanced Options for Ubuntu -> recovery shell (just remember to remount your system with sudo mount -o rw,remount / once you get there): Change permissions and ownership on .Xauthority file in your home folder. Refer to this for more info. In fact, check permissions on all ...


0

I suggest the following: Format the USB as you would normally do Encrypt the valuable files with cross-platform encryption software Put the encryption software on the usb stick together with the encrypted files. Now you can decrypt the files everywhere. For a list of encryption software: http://arstechnica.com/civis/viewtopic.php?t=1245367


1

This isn't the greatest fix.. but it worked. I just changed my password to something else. I noticed that one of the characters that I was using required being hit twice to register. This was only happening in the GUI. So I changed my password to not have that character and BINGO BANGO all fixed up.


0

First of all, if I remember correctly you have to check a box to install Ubuntu with an encrypted home directory, but I could be wrong. It certainly looks like it's encrypted. Secondly, the bad news: if you encrypted the home directory at boot, it doesn't use your account password, but a separate pass phrase. After you first booted a pop up comes up with ...


0

I plugged a monitor into the Ubuntu Server (it runs the Desktop version of Ubuntu 14, I believe) and upon logging in saw a message asking me to create a passphrase. I clicked on it and hit enter (for a blank passphrase). After that, I rebooted and password-less SSH logins seemed to work again. Before I mark this as complete, I will give this a few days of ...


0

to pinpoint the source of the problem, try to setup passwordless login for localhost on the server. This way, you deal with only one machine, the server. If it does work, the problem is caused by the client(s); if it doesn't, you'll have to figure out what's wrong with the server itself


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This answer is based on an edit by the user to their own question. They should still answer when they can. Run an e2fsck -v /dev/device (replace /dev/device with the actual device path), and it can probably fix the issue.


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You don't have to enter your password for everything. Either your installation is severely broken somehow, or (more likely) you're not using it correctly. Consider running ls in the terminal. You don't need your password for this. Do you always run it as sudo ls? Don't do this. If running ls without sudo fails, paste the result of running sudo ls -l /bin/ls ...


-1

This command should do it: sudo chmod +s /usr/lib/policykit-1/polkit-agent-helper-1 I had this problem when I moronically changed the owner of /usr/lib recursively.


0

Linux and other UNIX-like operating systems handle permissions very tightly. If you launch applications from your terminal constantly, you can switch your permissions to superuser with this command: sudo su Note that this shouldn't be used as a be-all-end-all command. Software launched with root permissions can alter your system without asking for additional ...


0

If 'ashot' is your root account, don't call 'sudo passwd'. I've been doing that for the past few months and it wouldn't change my password. To change my password, I had to call 'passwd' without 'sudo'. Otherwise, the password modification is not taken account of.


1

This doesn't exactly answer the question, but it is another approach to the issue. A couple of versions of Kubuntu ago, I couldn't figure out how to turn this off either. Since I was kind of tired of screensavers anyway, I just turned the screen saving to start after an hour when power is plugged into my notebook (so it wouldn't come on while watching ...


1

had the same problem today and found your thread^^, so I started myself to solve the problem. I did the same as you did, except I used the conf file from the phone and put the psk in. The file should look like this and is in /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/ [connection] id=<<<FILE NAME HERE(SSID>>> uuid=<<< HERE IS A ...


1

#!/bin/bash read -p "Please enter your username: " user read -s -p "Please enter your password: " pass xfreerdp -f -u "$user" -d campus -p "$pass" --ignore-certificate website.com If you want to do the equivalent with a GUI dialog window, take a look at zenity e.g. pass="$(zenity --password)"


1

A group called PrivacyIdea have created a little package to add a HMAC-SHA1 challenge-response routine to the initramfs, which means that Ubuntu can query you for a challenge to pass to the Yubikey and then use the response to unlock the LUKS volume. For the most part, I'm following these instructions, with some added comments. The process is actually very ...


2

sudo asks for your password by default. It is not recommended, but you may bypass passwords for users/groups for all, or limited commands, if you chose to do so. Here is why sudo asks for a password by default: Linux is a multi-user system, and the easiest way to see this is to look at the root user, vs your own user. Major system-critical components are ...



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