Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

See man crypt, which says, in part: NOTES Glibc notes The glibc2 version of this function supports additional encryption algorithms. If salt is a character string starting with the characters "$id$" followed by a string terminated by "$": $id$salt$encrypted then instead of using the DES machine, id identifies the ...


0

Regarding the 1st question: How secure the data is largely depends on the user. EncFS works with a private and public folder where the public folder is the encrypted version that can be used to upload to an on-line service or across machines. If for example you place an unencrypted file inside the public folder it will be shared making the contents visible ...


-1

I had the same problem earlier, if you only have one user then chances are that the user password and root password are the same which was true in my case. enter: passwd into terminal and set a new password. Then sudo -i login again with that password. it worked for me...


0

From the network manager (wifi symbol in the top right). Click on edit connection. Select your wifi network (Eduroam in your case). Go to the general tab. Select "All users may connect to this network".


1

Ubuntu does not set the password for root on installation. Instead, run sudo -i and enter the password of the user which is logged in. You are now root. If you want to use su command to become root type passwd root after you have gained root privileges with "sudo -i". After the root password is set you should be able to run "su".


6

This answer is complementary to Heather's one (which will work). First of all, take into account that in Unix (and Linux) if one is able to take root privileges, they can do anything. In the case of Heather answer, nothing will stop your user to just sudo /usr/bin/applicationcommand (with a bit of search for the real path or whatever). But I suppose this ...


3

Try using setuid from package super. Do sudo apt-get install super, then create a shell script that can only be run as root. Have that shell script run only one command: #!/bin/sh setuid $ORIG_USER applicationcommand exit 0 Then, set an alias for each of the users so that applicationcommand points to the shell script you created by adding into each of ...


0

What you're looking for is the setuid bit, it allows the users to exec a program with the permissions of its owner. /!\ Be careful with it, it's often a bad solution, due to the security problems it exposes.


2

Change the line in the sudoers file to: kf ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: /sbin/fstrim I don't recommend, adding the script in /etc/sudoers, because the script can be altered and every command (the whole script) would then be executed with root privileges.


1

In Ubuntu setup, you cannt set a blank password. That's how UNIX and UNIX-like operating systems work to protect some of the administrators functionnality that can affect the system. So there is a password and you have to find the one that set it up.


0

If it is a BIOS password try removing the CMOS battery


0

If you forgot your password for your Linux login, you can remove the password and set up a new one. When Linux is booting, hit the Shift key to access the grub menu. You have to hit it at the right time. You also may have to hit it more than once to be sure you hit it at the right time. Use the arrows to select the Advanced Options -> [Arrow to Enter ...


-1

I solved my problem by this: sudo apt-get remove --purge mysql-server mysql-client mysql-common sudo apt-get autoremove sudo apt-get autoclean sudo apt install mysql-server


0

Storing passwords is generally wrong. Logging in through ssh storing the user's password in ~/.bashrc (and / or in the commands' history) is not safe for obvious reasons; one might use ssh keys instead, as suggested in the comments by lemonslice. However if this is the path you want to follow, just pipe the password to the ssh command; using echo with the ...


0

If you are using gpg-agent all passwords (including the master password) are stored/saved in ~/.password-store. From the "pass" website: There will be a nice password input dialog using the standard gpg-agent (which can be configured to stay authenticated for several minutes), since all passwords are encrypted. gpg-agent manual page: ...


0

Lets try the following: Open /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf with your favorite editor (e. g. sudo vim /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf) Comment out the following string: autologin-user=your_login


1

you unchecked the option when you installed ubuntu . there was option Ask password for login or some thing other when you create user . now you have to run command sudo gpasswd -d username nopasswdlogin or do Settings->User Accounts->Unlock->Automatic Login-> Off


3

In your System Settings there is a Brightness & Lock icon. This contains what you are looking for: This is on Gnome3, but should work similar on Unity.


1

Search system settings and click brightness and lock. Set the timer to dim the screen on x seconds of inactivity and the timer to lock after x seconds of dim screen.


3

I think you're on an SSH session. SSH lets you send special commands to SSH itself (not the shell you logged into) using certain "escape" sequences. From man ssh: ESCAPE CHARACTERS When a pseudo-terminal has been requested, ssh supports a number of functions through the use of an escape character. A single tilde character can be sent as ~~ or by ...


4

Usernames are stored in /etc/passwd - so you can look in here to remind yourself what the usernames are - anyone can read this file. Passwords are stored (hashed) in /etc/shadow To reset a user's password: sudo passwd <username> -- it will ask you for a new password. Last question - erm - don't tell anyone? Not quite sure what sort of suggestion ...


1

setup a root password using, sudo passwd below URL gives you more detail about user management. https://help.ubuntu.com/12.04/serverguide/user-management.html


0

Try using the --ask flag: nmcli --ask con up id MyVPN I've dropped sudo because it is probably unnecessary (and dangerous).


3

Not bash, but you could use a Perl script in your bash script :P First install libauthen-pam-perl sudo apt-get install libauthen-pam-perl After that create a new Perl script, eg. with the name foo … #!/usr/bin/env perl use Authen::PAM; use POSIX qw(ttyname); $service = "login"; $username = $ARGV[0]; $password = $ARGV[1]; $tty_name = ...


1

As an alternative to solve the bug, the init process may be switched to upstart, since this is a bug related with systemd. Here is stated that upstart may be used as a workaround. To do so, the easiest way is to install the corresponding package: sudo apt-get install upstart-sysv After the installation, you still are able to start the system with systemd ...


2

Not with native Linux/Ubuntu (ie. by manually editing the password files); It is possible using a LDAP server. The userPassword can have more than 1 value. But there is NO way to distinguish between the 2 passwords after logon. The password is not kept in memory or set to a variable after the initial check so this ... Basically I'd like to login to ...


1

Yup, sounds like you mis-typed/mis-remembered one or the other. If you can log in as a guest, open a terminal and type "cat /etc/password" to see if you recognize your username, probably at the bottom of the list. If you have the right username but the wrong password...I can't think of anything easier than just re-running the setup.


1

Solution: Old Wubi versions have bugs but i have found a solution from a forum post at ubuntuforums.org i can't find the same post but i have the links to patched files. This files are working. I tried the wubi from this link and worked. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/6uqomp8l1frcd1y/AAAhSCimTaYE-94egbmc1X_na?dl=0 Thanks to hakuna_matata


1

i found the answer sudo htpasswd -c /etc/nagios3/htpasswd.users nagiosadmin Enter a strong password when prompted.


1

Your password issue is a problem of outdated Wubi versions. If it is your wish to use an old Wubi version that works without password issue, try lastest version for 12.04: http://releases.ubuntu.com/precise/wubi.exe In your case (Windows is not in UEFI mode) it should work.



Top 50 recent answers are included