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0

To change password use su command in terminal. After su use passwd to change password. The password can be of short length. This works in Linux Mint.


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The most stupid issue ever seen! if you start your mysql-workbech by launcher this error comes out. But if you start your mysql workbench from terminal keyring problem disappears. Any ideas why this is happening? I was using version 6.0 and upgraded to 6.2.4 nothing changed. The workaround answer for this issue is Go terminal and start stupid workbench by ...


3

Does that mean anybody with physical access to my machine could reset the password and read the encrypted contents of my home folder? No, home encryption is linked to that password so if I stole your computer and changed the user password, I wouldn't be able to easily (more on that later) decrypt the data. That said, access to recovery mode means ...


1

Use full disk encryption instead. And limit physical access to your machine. If someone has physical access to your machine, they could simply steal your disk and take it elsewhere to eventually break the encryption as well.


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What would be the use of the password if anyone could read it? Of cause you can't. In your situation there are two ways: Reinstall Ubuntu. I recommend it because this way you will both get all the settings right and be sure nobody left a nasty trick in your machine, intentionally or not. Boot from live CD. Then chroot into your system and change passwd. ...


1

Here's how to delete your current gnome keyring: rm ~/.local/share/keyrings/login.keyring That should work, but I'm not entirely sure what all will be effected though. You could try & save the old keyring with instructions from here though I'm not following step 2 "create a new keyring", might mean to use seahorse - other users suggest that seahorse ...


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Well, hopefully you made backups. You could attempt to get in with 3rd party decryption programs, like OphCrack. Or, you can boot into recovery mode by holding SHIFT while starting. Find root, then remount ubuntu as un-readonly with this command: mount -o rw,remount / to access password reset goodness, type: passwd username where username is your ...


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Short answer: grub might be broken. You can follow the instructions here to repair it or reinstall it. In a nutshell: you boot from a live (in this case ubuntu) cd/usb mount the partition where grub is installed bind the directories that grub needs access to to detect other operating systems install, check, and update grub Somewhat longer answer: I ...


0

Create a file with this: UPDATE mysql.user SET Password=PASSWORD('MyNewPass') WHERE User='root'; FLUSH PRIVILEGES; Stop the mysql server and run this: mysqld_safe --init-file=/home/me/mysql-init & Check here for more details: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/resetting-permissions.html


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Go to System Settings > User Accounts. Make sure to press Lock / Unlock in the upper right corner of the window. Then you can use the switch to enable Automatic-Login. If you are using home folder encryption auto-login is not reasonable. But you can disable encryption if you follow the steps of the answer to the second linked question.


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for those really using gpg-agent, you can forget passphrases with: echo RELOADAGENT | gpg-connect-agent


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This answer is a variation on the guest1000's solution, but I don't have enough rep to create a comment. Anyway, adding the following to ~/.bashrc also works and seems cleaner to me: export GNOME_KEYRING_CONTROL=$(ls -d /run/user/1000/keyring-*)


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Installing the package crack-lib solved it for me: sudo apt-get install cracklib-runtime I had it working fine too, but one day (after some update) it disappeared.


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The default keyring does not pop up if you leave it password-less. It will pop up ONCE after installing Ubuntu and if you do not enter a password it will stay quiet. Open "keyrings" from Dash and it will show this when there is no password: Rightclick "login" and set a password when this shows: After that you will need to provide a password. Remove ...


1

This is a change made from v12.04 and not an actual "bug," and should probably go to the "developer suggestion box" than in a support forum. Thanks anyway, people.


0

My comment also works as a partial answer. After you come back from suspend do the following: [Ctrl]+[Alt]+F6 to leave the X session. You don't have to type anything in to the terminal that appears. [Ctrl]+[Alt]+F7 to come back to the X session. Now you can input the password and it validates properly. It's not a fix, but a lot easier than rebooting.


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Sounds like port 22 is blocked. Depending on where you are running your server from there are several options. The first is accessing your router and unblocking port 22. You could also try running ssh from port 80. ssh -p 80 myserver.net btw, what kind of address are you using to access your server? If you are using an IP address make sure you are not ...


1

Using wildcards in the sudoers file In the sudoers file, you can use wildcards (*), thus creating the possibility to run a script with arguments. An example I tested it with a shockingly simple python script. In the sudoers file I had to use the absolute path to python: /usr/bin/python in the line of the sudoers file: jacob ALL=NOPASSWD: ...


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mysql-workbench is looking for the GNOME_KEYRING_CONTROL environment variable. If you are the only one using your computer, that variable should have a value similar to /run/user/1000/keyring-XXXXXX. I had a similar problem with mysql-workbench package downloaded from dev.mysql.com (because MariaDB and Ubuntu's mysql-workbench package are incompatible) and ...


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I am not expert here, But in my suggestion, please try to use this tutorial: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SSH/OpenSSH/Keys


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When you set up your VPN connection through the GUI the password is saved in the key-ring. If you save your password in the connection file, like this: sudo nano /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/MyConnectionExampleName in this file: # 1 here means key-ring I think, but with 0, the password below is used [vpn] password-flags=0 ...


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I finally found the answer here. The issue was that I was missing the ~/.pgpass file. So I created one with access permission 600 (this is important) and added the following lines: localhost:*:*:postgres:postgres 127.0.0.1:*:*:postgres:postgres After a restart of postgresql all was well :)


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smb.conf is a red herring ; this sets up Samba on your local box - ie, serving shared folders up, not accessing them. Try from a terminal sudo mount -t cifs \ -o user=windowsuser,domain=windowsdomain,uid=ubuntuusername \ //windowsmachine/sharedfolder /mnt Which should prompt you for your sudo password, then your Windows one. The ...


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Yes, you will need encryption if you want to stop the average user. The past has proven encryption can also be bypassed through backdoors. There was a newsitem back in 2013 that the NSA paid for a backdoor in the RSA encryption. But it is unlikely that the NSA or someone who knew how this backdoor works is the person mounting your disk. You will not have ...


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Yes, they would be able to access the data. If you want to avoid that, you have to encrypt the data. Here is some information how to use the encrypted "Private" folder or to encrypt your home folder: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/EncryptedHome Here you can find how to encrypt any folder or partition: ...


0

A keyring is never used to save a password (From Facebook or otherwise). The Gnome or KDE keyrings are used to safely keep decrypted keys (hence the name) and no passwords. One solution for you is to make use of two browsers. For example you could install Firefox and Seamonkey (because Seamonkey is very similar to Firefox.) You can also install Opera, ...


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Download "Disks" from Software Manager. Run it. Select your encrypted device partition. Click gear icon. Select "Change passphrase". That's it


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During the install , and when you get to the screen that asks for your username and machine name , you should set a simple password, and tick the check box that says login automatically , this way you will not have to type this password during login but it is always require for installing or modifying critical aspects of the OS, so you should set it


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Warning; not tested because I think it's not such a great idea, even for a VM (bad habits are difficult to remove...). I think this is a PAM thing (PAM=pluggable authentication modules). In /etc/pam.d there are all the PAM configuration files that tell the system how to do the authentication of users. Now, the module that check for the passwords "unix ...


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try sudo -s It will ask your password to login in as root. then use passwd to change the root password. if you are not in sudo user type sudo visudo add this line in the last ALL=NOPASSWD: ALL then ctrl+x to exit then y to save the changes then try again sudo -s it will login to root without asking password


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Okay, I finally solved this myself. Even though I had set "Automatic Login" to off and had set a user password in System Settings-> User Accounts, it had failed to properly set the flags in /etc/gshadow and /etc/group. To check and see if it is set properly, do in terminal: sudo grep nopasswd /etc/gshadow which should return something like: ...


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The Ubuntu Desktop 14.04 LTS came pre-installed with Remmina that use the RDP - Remote Desktop Protocol, then it connect with Microsoft Windows OS too. It setup is full feature and tweaks. Beyond it have SFTP, SSH and VNC as alternative protocols. http://remmina.sourceforge.net/


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Attack vectors: Behind a NAT router (most are nowadays) fat chance of anyone getting in. And ufw running as well: even less chance... Without a NAT router: it's just software, not hardware. Software can be hacked especially if automatic updates are off. Physical access: Indeed, you're right. the password is the least of your concerns while the attacker ...



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