Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

It lets you type the password, it just doesn't show it to you. Type the correct password and press enter. You should be able to go.


3

You can set a password from terminal, just open up your favorite terminal and type: passwd If your feeling advanced you can stop Ubuntu prompting for password by configuring polkit Here's an example of configuring polkit to enable users to install apps without authentication.


3

It looks like username belongs to the nopasswdlogin group, which means that only the name is required to log in, regardless of whether a password is actually set for the account (note: this is not the same as autologin - which bypasses the login screen altogether). You should be able to just remove the user from the group e.g. with terminal command sudo ...


3

Maybe your keyboard settings are not exactly the same in the tty and elsewhere (layout, numeric pad use and so on). I suggest you type your password in the login field in order to see how it looks really. HTH


3

The actual passwords are not stored, you can only find their hashes in /etc/shadow. There is no easy way to recover passwords, your best try is to use a software like John the Ripper to crack your password, but if you used a strong password, cracking it might take a very, very long time.


2

The default setting in Debian (and hence Ubuntu) for OpenSSH Server is to deny password-based login for root and allow only key-based login. Change this line in /etc/ssh/sshd_config: PermitRootLogin without-password to PermitRootLogin yes And restart the SSH server: sudo service ssh restart


2

This is actually OS independent. If an attacker has physical access to your machine, then that machine is compromised. Period. This has nothing to do with what operating system you are using, it is true for all of them. The only way to protect yourself from that (and it is also imperfect) is to encrypt your data. User passwords fail miserably since, as you ...


2

ZIP archives can be encrypted. You will need either to know a decription password specific to the archive you downloaded or you'll need a password-guessing software fcrackzip that will simply try every possible password. The software is in Ubuntu repositories.


2

You could try opening a terminal window by Ctrl+ Alt+ T and run following command: passwd And for root: sudo passwd If there was no password set, you can enter a new one. But I think it is not possible to setup Ubuntu without a password, maybe autologin is enabled, or factory setup was not finished successfully.


2

If I understand you correctly, you would like to set up a universal password that all users would have to input in order to execute a command as root with a sudo command. Example: Account-A = Password-1 Account-B = Password-2 root = root-password If Account-A or Account-B enters the command: sudo apt-get autoclean Then the subsequent output: ...


2

Umm what do you mean "everytime"? I'm sitting here and I don't have to... To install a program, what the computer does is (essentially 1) runs apt-get on a file you downloaded. As you may know, apt-get actually has to be sudo apt-get2. So any GUI program (like the software centre) that is installing things (using an equivalent of apt-get) has to become ...


2

From man unrar -p<password> Set password. So your line would be something like: for file in *.part01.rar; do unrar x -p<password> ${file}; done;


1

When you boot into recovery mode, the root partition (/) is mounted in read-only mode as to cause the least possible damage. This command simply remounts it in read-write mode so that you can persist changes (eg a new password) to disk. Without warranty or guarantee, I can say with 110% certainty that this will not hurt your data... But remember that you ...


1

You will likely need to login to a root shell via the recovery console in order to re-enable your account password. After that, you can disable password login for ssh specifically by setting PasswordAuthentication no in the sshd_config file, and leave the account password enabled for local access (including running sudo once you have logged in via SSH ...


1

After running passwd -l on a user, that user can't set their password (until after it's set back to something usable). Since you cannot use sudo, you'll need to reset your user account password, the same way as if you'd just forgotten what it was: How do I reset a lost administrative password? Or How do I reset a lost password (using recovery mode ...


1

In order to fix your problem, simply move your line: fizzbuzz ALL=NOPASSWD: ALL chadmin ALL=NOPASSWD: ALL form sudoers file to sudo visudo -f /etc/sudoers.d/myOverrides This is better approach than edit sudoers. Use always visudo, if you insert errors in the file, you may not longer be able to run sudo. Your directive doesn't work because are ...


1

You can first create a Virtual Machine (VM) image from virtualbox or vmware which already has a key pair. as you can control your virtualbox or vmware freely, you can get the key pair from the virtual host. then import the keypair into your openstack. upload this virtual machine image create a instance(A) from this image create a instance(B) from the ...


1

From the sounds of it, you may not understand what exactly an "admin" account is - My answer may be irrelevant, but it seems appropriate to leave it here, anyway. For a user to be an "admin" - they have to be in the sudo group - $ sudo usermod -G sudo -a yourAdminUser and then yourAdminUser will be a real admin.


1

Try this method: From this source: http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/linux/reset-your-ubuntu-password-easily-from-the-live-cd/ You’ll want to boot from your Ubuntu Live CD, choosing “Try Ubuntu without any change to your computer” from the boot menu. Once the system boots, open up a new Terminal window from Applications \ Accessories and then type in the ...


1

I made a script that automatically decrypt your password files. I published it in: https://github.com/peppelinux/remmina_password_exposer


1

What operation you are trying to do? You can run program as admin by typing sudo programname on a terminal. To open a terminal, press CtrlAltT.


1

You may have simply not unlocked the user accounts menu. On the top right of the user accounts menu is an Unlock button. Click it and enter your password when asked (or the admin password if it is different). You will then be able to change the password, create accounts or set auto login.


1

Just open terminal Type sudo passwd username Then type your old password then new password. Retry And done


1

root, as a user, has a disabled password for your protection. To run a program as root, use either sudo or gksudo, if the program is terminal based or graphic based. For example, to edit your rc.local file, you would open a terminal and type gksudo nano /etc/rc.local The password for performing items with the root permissions is the same password you ...


1

The explain Password prompting in Linux is a security thing. Linux is built with far higher security than Windows. It usually prompts you with a password if you're making installations or changing system-wide settings. You will notice password prompting usually if a command is preceeded by sudo. That means "super user do", or do this in super-user ...


1

You can use ecryptfs-utils to encrypt a folder, and it asks for password under Ubuntu. Not sure about Windows though.


1

You can change the password to your Ubuntu OS even if you have forgotten the password by going into recovery mode. If you have dual boot, you will have an option right next to your Ubuntu OS for recovery mode. Otherwise, you can do this by hitting the Shift key (while booting) if you haven't got a dual boot. Once in recovery mode select option root. Then ...


1

Simply you cannot do that , the local user should be registered in /etc/passwd , there is some tips like : creating user accounts with uid < 1000 so GUI tools ignore it . creating shell users so it will not be seen at login screen . But at cli level they will catch you !



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible