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6

Some background info: User log-ins are handled by the PAM system (Pluggable Authentication Module) and in this particular case by the pam_tally subsystem (to tally the user accounts). As pam_tally itself will be deprecated, you should use pam_tally2, which comes in two parts: pam_tally2.so being the module that does the authentication itself and which ...


6

It makes the password length harder to know. If your screen is being monitored, for example, using • placeholders would allow an attacker to dramatically reduce the number of passwords they'd need to try in order to crack your password. Good passwords are made up of a bank of about 40 characters. So compare the difference between If you have a 10 char ...


5

Firstly, there should be zero reason to login as the tomcat7 user. There's no logical use case for this, so therefore I'm not sure why you'd try and use it. You state in your question you want to set up a virtual X server for a webapp - you don't need to login as tomcat7 to do this, though your question isn't "How can I launch a virtual X server for my ...


4

Under Settings→Security & Privacy there is an option to disable requiring the password when the screen is awakened.


3

There is two types of accounts, system and regular user. System accounts belong to services and daemons, such as lightdm, dnsmasq, etc.Typically you cannot login into those accounts (although there are ways). Regular users, such as your account or other people accounts, can login and interact with the OS through shell (could be bash, ksh, mksh, csh, or ...


3

There is no way to get true randomness from a deterministic machine! Any algorithm in existence today (not using non-deterministic hardware) generates pseudo-random noise, not true randomness, so the answer to your question is: No, the passwords generated using the pwgen -s -y command are not truly random! Sorry, one of my pet-peeves: they are very random ...


2

The issue was related to the fact that the NFS was not configured correctly on the Ubuntu machines. When I did ls -l the file owner and group were nobody nogroup. Once I fixed the NFS configuration, everything went well.


2

GNU Screen stores user's passwords in ~/.screenrcand authenticates using PAM in /etc/pam.d/screen. Deleting ~/.screenrc should solve the problem.


2

There is no need to show a * when inputting characters. Showing a * gives a hint to anyone watching you type: they then know the amount of characters you typed. And since is it better to type a wrong password than to have 1 person get to know something about your password (even if it is just the length) not showing a * is the better method. In case of ...


2

I found my answer here. Since these questions have different phrases I thought of not deleting my question. This might help somebody else. Run sudo grep nopasswd /etc/* This will display at least 2 lines: /etc/group:nopasswdlogin:x:112:`<login name>` /etc/gshadow:nopasswdlogin:!::`<login name>` Edit those files with sudo and remove only ...


1

Try to give permission to your script file: $ sudo chmod +x start-dfs.sh Then execute. $ sudo bash start-dfs.sh


1

My reasoning behind this is following: number of "•" characters you enter is very big hint for someone that would like to know/break your password. If the bad guy don't see nothing, your password is more secure. Possibly there are other reasons but one above is enough for me.


1

This is common issue with encrypted home, and was answered many times, for example on Unix, but is covered even in official Ubuntu documentation. This is probably caused by the fact, that your home directory (and therefore the key) is not accessible during the login time. This can be caused by the fact, that your home is mounted from network drive (on ...


1

Work in progress This can be accomplished by using: a custom X session which starts a basic window manager and runs the script a custom configuration for LightDM which will autologin your user and use the above session a custom service for LightDM which will use the above configuration appropriate kernel parameters to disable the normal LightDM service ...


1

You can't do it from guest account. And next time be more careful while typing your password. Get an Ubuntu Live media (the same you used to install it) and boot your computer from it. In a terminal, run: sudo mount /dev/sdXY /mnt Replacing XY with the appropriate letter/number to your Ubuntu partition. sudo chroot /mnt sudo passwd username Replace ...


1

Create a folder in the /etc/lightdm/ folder called lightdm.conf.d: sudo mkdir -p /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d Next, create a file and call it 10-ubuntu.conf: sudo gedit /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d/10-ubuntu.conf and add the following lines to it: [SeatDefaults] user-session=ubuntu greeter-show-manual-login=true greeter-hide-users=true ...


1

Yes, sudo uses PAM and PAM supports configuration for each application. Authentication and logging The sudoers security policy requires that most users authenticate themselves before they can use sudo. A password is not required if the invoking user is root, if the target user is the same as the invoking user, or if the policy has disabled ...


1

From your question, it is not fully clear if you need to be inside the directory of CMDexecutable (and thus cd first) or if the full path would do, but the only option I see is to add the script to the sudoers file, as described here. Then you can run the script with sudo, without having to enter the password. You can simply run the (python) script then by ...


1

the simplest answer is this question : why to show the password ? if someone knows how many character your password has , he can make a dictionary with all possible combination of characters and numbers with the same length of your password. it would be cracked later.



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