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5

This is in fact the same password you use when you login your user. Make sure you not have Caps-Lock activated and so on. Unless you messed something up greatly this should work. You should be even able to switch to the super-user by using sudo su, sudo -i and such commands, which is not recommended because in this case you forfeit the security layer which ...


4

Instead of doing su root, you should use sudo instead, as the root account is not enabled by default in Ubuntu, and will not work. This is why you are getting an "Authentication failure" message. Regarding password entry - it won't show you anything as you type, but, it will accept your password after you press enter. Make sure you entered the right ...


2

FYI: unlocking a Kingston SSD by use of hdparm, after setting a user password appears to be impossible. NOTE: The drive will appear as locked next time you reboot after setting your password. Until then, security will only appear as enabled. Whether trying the very user-password you just set, or other variants, such as "", "NULL", NULL or a row of 32 ...


1

No, you cannot prevent root from changing your password. The root user has full control of the system, and if someone can log in as root, they can change your password. Likewise, if another user has access to sudo, you cannot prevent them from changing your password. You can protect your data by encrypting your home folder. Users who can use sudo (or log ...


1

The only possible solution which comes in my mind is to crack it by brute force. Rarcrack works with RAR and 7z as well. Look at this page: Rarcrack To be honest, if you set very long password or/and have slow computer, it may take days to crack.


1

You had a NOPASSWD rule applied to your user in some file in /etc/sudoers.d. Use sudo grep NOPASSWD /etc/sudoers.d -R to find out which. Your /etc/sudoers is not the default, however. The default sudoers can be obtained by looking at the sudo package: $ apt-get download sudo Get:1 http://mirror.cse.iitk.ac.in/ubuntu xenial-updates/main amd64 sudo amd64 1.8....


1

Edit your sudoers file using sudo visudo. Find this line: Defaults env_reset and change it to this: Defaults env_reset,timestamp_timeout=0 This forces sudo to ask for a password every time your run it.


1

The --security-erase option presumes a drive that has already been locked with that password. I infer from your previous question that you just want a secure destruction of everything on the disk. This is how I do that: sudo su - cat /dev/urandom > /dev/sda Now wait (quite) a while for the "out of space" error. Disk sda is wiped, and very securely ...


1

I found this simple script to get the job done: #!/bin/bash # Script to add a user to Linux system if [ $(id -u) -eq 0 ]; then read -p "Enter username : " username read -s -p "Enter password : " password egrep "^$username" /etc/passwd >/dev/null if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then echo "$username exists!" exit 1 else pass=$(...


1

Here's how to fix it: Press Ctrl+Alt+F1. Then you will be greeted by a terminal prompt. Now type in the terminal: sudo apt-get remove gnome-do This will remove gnome-do and your login problem is now fixed. To reboot, type: sudo shutdown -r now That's it! You should be able to login into your account without any problems.


1

I wasn't able to recreate this issue but as Bharadwaj Raju suggested you can use Ctrl ALT F1 to enter a terminal then remove gnome-do .. then once booted back in, if you want to use the program still .. you can install it and run it then click the triangle in the upper right and select preferences. In the general tab select Hide window on first launch (quiet ...


1

Turn on your device, then hold down the "shift" key. You will be greeted by the "grub" menu. Then select the second option on the screen: Now, you will see a menu with these options: Select the "root" option. Then you will be greeted by a root prompt that looks like this: root@ubuntu:~# Now type: mount -rw -o remount / Then type: root@ubuntu:~# ...


1

This is a known Bug, see here I looked through some of the comments and there are a few proposed workarounds. Remove the account: Not really a solution. Nevertheless: Go to Settings, Accounts, select the perpetrator and click on remove. A notable alternative E-Mail client is Thunderbird. Set the period for checking for new mail: Go to Settings, Accounts, ...


1

This will give you the password for your current connection. sudo grep psk= /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/* Or sudo grep psk= /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/(YOUR-SSID)


1

Nice one-liner to remove sudo prompts for the current user sudo bash -c 'echo "$(logname) ALL=(ALL:ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL" | (EDITOR="tee -a" visudo)'



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