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7

This answer is complementary to Heather's one (which will work). First of all, take into account that in Unix (and Linux) if one is able to take root privileges, they can do anything. In the case of Heather answer, nothing will stop your user to just sudo /usr/bin/applicationcommand (with a bit of search for the real path or whatever). But I suppose this ...


5

Try using setuid from package super. Do sudo apt-get install super, then create a shell script that can only be run as root. Have that shell script run only one command: #!/bin/sh setuid $ORIG_USER applicationcommand exit 0 Then, set an alias for each of the users so that applicationcommand points to the shell script you created by adding into each of ...


4

Usernames are stored in /etc/passwd - so you can look in here to remind yourself what the usernames are - anyone can read this file. Passwords are stored (hashed) in /etc/shadow To reset a user's password: sudo passwd <username> -- it will ask you for a new password. Last question - erm - don't tell anyone? Not quite sure what sort of suggestion ...


3

I think you're on an SSH session. SSH lets you send special commands to SSH itself (not the shell you logged into) using certain "escape" sequences. From man ssh: ESCAPE CHARACTERS When a pseudo-terminal has been requested, ssh supports a number of functions through the use of an escape character. A single tilde character can be sent as ~~ or by ...


3

Not bash, but you could use a Perl script in your bash script :P First install libauthen-pam-perl sudo apt-get install libauthen-pam-perl After that create a new Perl script, eg. with the name foo … #!/usr/bin/env perl use Authen::PAM; use POSIX qw(ttyname); $service = "login"; $username = $ARGV[0]; $password = $ARGV[1]; $tty_name = ...


3

In your System Settings there is a Brightness & Lock icon. This contains what you are looking for: This is on Gnome3, but should work similar on Unity.


2

Change the line in the sudoers file to: kf ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: /sbin/fstrim I don't recommend, adding the script in /etc/sudoers, because the script can be altered and every command (the whole script) would then be executed with root privileges.


2

See man crypt, which says, in part: NOTES Glibc notes The glibc2 version of this function supports additional encryption algorithms. If salt is a character string starting with the characters "$id$" followed by a string terminated by "$": $id$salt$encrypted then instead of using the DES machine, id identifies the ...


2

From man useradd : -p, --password PASSWORD The encrypted password, as returned by crypt(3). The default is to disable the password. As you can see the PASSWORD with -p option is the encrypted password returned by the crypt(3) library function. If you use -p password1, the system will consider this plain text password1 as the encrypted shadow ...


2

If you really used command sudo passwd (with no additional argument), then you changed the password for the root account - not your user account. In Ubuntu, which locks the root account by default, this will have had the side effect of unlocking the root account. To change your own user account password, you should simply type passwd and follow the ...


1

Ubuntu does not set the password for root on installation. Instead, run sudo -i and enter the password of the user which is logged in. You are now root. If you want to use su command to become root type passwd root after you have gained root privileges with "sudo -i". After the root password is set you should be able to run "su".


1

you unchecked the option when you installed ubuntu . there was option Ask password for login or some thing other when you create user . now you have to run command sudo gpasswd -d username nopasswdlogin or do Settings->User Accounts->Unlock->Automatic Login-> Off


1

In Ubuntu setup, you cannt set a blank password. That's how UNIX and UNIX-like operating systems work to protect some of the administrators functionnality that can affect the system. So there is a password and you have to find the one that set it up.


1

setup a root password using, sudo passwd below URL gives you more detail about user management. https://help.ubuntu.com/12.04/serverguide/user-management.html


1

Search system settings and click brightness and lock. Set the timer to dim the screen on x seconds of inactivity and the timer to lock after x seconds of dim screen.



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