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If you're using testing version or latest version, I suggest you to use ubuntu 12.04 LTS, it's very stable release, and has matured over time. Your system won't freeze as frequently. And after that if some problem exist, ask it here, you'll get answers very easily Here is answer if you want to install mint/elemenntryOS Go to terminal and write ...


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Your GPT partition table is broken according to the output of gdisk. Please backup your partition table to a file on a working drive with: sudo sgdisk --backup=table /dev/sda | tee /path/to/backup.sgdisk You need to store it somewhere where you have write permissions like a USB drive or your home folder. If you're on a live system, you should also store ...


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According to your comment the USB drive is broken. You cannot format it or write to it in this state.


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Test this: Plug Your usb drive. Open a terminal: Run it: sudo -i #Verify that your device is /dev/sdc with fdisk: fdisk -l umount /dev/sdc fdisk /dev/sdc o ---#Create a new empty partition table n ---#Create a new partition w ---#Write the new partition table and exit #Format partition in ext4 filesystem mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdc1 The fdisk menu: Command ...


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Boot from gparted live cd http://gparted.org/livecd.php If you dont't want to have /dev/sda5 partition any more right click on it and remove - this 100MB of data will be lost. (You can't do this right now because it is mounted). Right click on /dev/sda6 and resize. or down size /dev/sda5 and then resize dev/sda6 Be aware that there is always risk, ...


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You must boot from a live-dvd/usb. Once in the live-session run gparted with root attributes: Open a terminal. Run it: sudo -i gparted From gparted, unmount partitions, delete /dev/sda5, increase /dev/sda6 merging the unallocated space with /dev/sda6. Possibly Ubuntu becomes unusable. Continue running: blkid /dev/sda6 #The output will say like: ...


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Cant install Ubuntu alongside Windows 7 on HP 650 - Cant recognize Windows partition The answer in this question helped, and now i have installed Ubuntu alongside Windows successfully and i have dual boot.


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You are only allowed four (4) Primary partitions. If you have to create a fifth (5) partition, then you will have to create it as logical partition. This option is available in Gparted.


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Thanks for your answer. Based on that, I moved forward. I was able to successfully migrate the RAID volume. One detail that complicated the move was that I had the RAID array as part of the LVM Group. So once I had the new system re-built, the RAID array was recognized, but I was unable to mount any of the LVMs. I ended up having to use ...


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Try gparted (it's installed on the ubuntu install disk, you can just launch it from the dash). If gparted sees your windows partition, just create your additional partition there and apply. If it doesn't, you will have to fix it from the windows "administrative tools" (make sure the partitions are fine there, no exotic windows specific stuff). If you ...


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This is link for installing Ubuntu Here During installation choose the ’Something else’ option to create partition. All if you want install Ubuntu & after that you want to create partition than use Gparted or also you can first boot using USB or Live CD than create partition using Gparted. Gparted I hope this is help you.


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You won't be able to do this while running Ubuntu. The reason is that you're extended partition (/dev/sda4) is currently being used, and so you cannot modify it. You'll need to boot to an Ubuntu live CD/USB. Once you do that, you can run GParted, extend (resize) the extended partition (/dev/sda4), then create more partitions, resize or move around ...


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Just right click on the unallocated space and choose New. After that, choose partition type, File system type, add it, and then Apply. See images for detail.


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mdadm stores all the necessary info to reassemble a RAID in the volume header. As soon as you configure it correctly in your new system it should pick up the existing volumes.


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You need to either shrink the swap partition or make more room for the other partition from somewhere else. 15gb is really small for a full install, though. If you never use hibernate and you have plenty of ram you can delete the swap partition and enlarge the other partition to fill the extra space if you want.


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Test this: Assuming that your external drive is /dev/sdc Create a table of gpt partition and a partition: sudo -i gdisk /dev/sdc The initial output is a warning if the disk is not a new disk or a disk already using GPT: GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 0.7.2 Partition table scan: MBR: MBR only BSD: not present APM: not present GPT: not present ...


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You do not have grub installed in your MBR. You can simply re-install grub from a live cd. The process is a bit complicated, involves mounting a few partitions and installing grub. Give this a try and keep us posted on your results.


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If you're going to install Ubuntu alongside Windows 7 then there is no need to wait for Ubuntu. You can go ahead and install Windows 7 on the hard drive and when you install Ubuntu 14.04 make sure you choose 'Install Ubuntu alongside Windows 7' and at that point you can set the size of the Linux partition.


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I can't comment on a Paging file being to be created in Open Suse since I have no prior experience with it. However Swap is the paging partition for Linux. The following is excerpted from SwapFaq (by Contributors to the Ubuntu documentation wiki): What is swap? Swap space is the area on a hard disk which is part of the Virtual Memory of your ...


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According to your error message, I think you didn't shutdown your Windows OS. Since your system is having dual boot OS, you need to shutdown it properly(i.e. neither hibernate nor sleep). Open your Windows OS and shutdown it properly, then again open your Ubuntu, your problem will be solved.!


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You can mount it in read only mode For it, first you have to create a directory as mount point: sudo mkdir /media/*youruser*/newdisk Later, mount the drive with: sudo mount -t "ntfs" -ro "uhelper=udisks2,nodev,nosuid,uid=1000,gid=1000,dmask=0077,fmask=0177" "/dev/sda4" "/media/*youruser*/newdisk" Change words with *, with your user name. /dev/sda4 ...


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/dev/sda5 and friends are partitions, a type of block device. They don't have (sub-)directories, but they can contain file systems. Only file systems can have directories. To open a file system use the mount command on the block device that contains the file system: sudo mount [block device] [mountpoint] where [block device] is the containing device (in ...


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You can't directly mount a subdirectory of a partition without first mounting the partition. you can not mount just a folder from a partition, if you want to mount a folder you will need to mount its partition first. or better if you want mount just a folder it will mount its partition automatically.


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I was about to suggest boot-repair when I saw it had already been suggested. Having opened that link I wish to add a word of caution; Please do not take the second option and "install" boot repair. I've tried that. It screwed up the installation beyond repair. Instead I would advice either using the first option or a heretofore not documented third ...


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Running mkfs.ext4 overwrites certain areas where ext4 metadata is stored. I guess that companies specialized in data recovery may recover some of your files (certainly not all of them), but that'll cost you several hundred dollars, if not more. Consider your data lost and take it as a lesson learned: Backups, backups, backups!


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Another approach is to mount it under /media and make /wdd a link to the mount point. Make your fstab like this: UUID=4xxxxxx-xxxxx /media/wdd ext4 defaults 0 2 Then, remove the existing /wdd directory and recreate it as a link: sudo rmdir /wdd; sudo ln -s /media/wdd/ /wdd You can also try the reverse approach but I;m not sure if nautilus will ...


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You could add it as a bookmark. Just add the line file:///wdd to file ~/.config/gtk-3.0/bookmarks. For more details see How to add bookmark to Nautilus 3.6?


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I have a GPT 32GB SanDisk USB with ubuntu GNOME installed. Infact, it's my everyday computer. Try this method to get it installed. Create a bootable USB drive. If you're uncertain about the process check this post. Launch USB in Live Mode (try ubuntu without installing). When it has booted verify disk type by firing up a terminal CTRL + ALT + T and run ...


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So after cleaning, we can see you have two different kernels left: generic and lowlatency. The uname command shows that you are using the lowlatency. If you are not using the generic kernel, you could delete its related files by running : sudo find /boot -name "*generic*" -delete This should halves the space used in /boot. You could/should also grow ...


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if you use uefi bios , you need an efi partition , and your win8 have already created one , and this efi partition doesn't need to monut , when you install , you just choose this partition to install efi loader file in it , it does the same thing when you install mbr in one partition for legacy bios


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EFI partition is usually the firs one, so you can create setup like this /dev/sda1 (~200MB) of filesystem FAT32 and mount point /boot/efi http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EFI_System_partition


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Do not remove /dev/sda1 (The 1st partition) The EFI partition is part of UEFI and is used by both Windows and Ubuntu. If you delete it, the computer won't boot. Comparing the Gparted and Disk Management screenshots, you want to delete 5th, 6th, and 7th partition as displayed in Windows Disk Management. Or /dev/sda9, /dev/sda10, /dev/sda11 as displayed in ...


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According to your GParted screenshot and what you have told us, you can see that the Ubuntu installation root is installed on /dev/sda9. You can tell this by looking in the "mount point" column and seeing the "/", which is the root. You can also tell that your /home is on /dev/sda10 by looking in the same column. Both of which are the only ext4 (not that ...


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From the output of df command what I can see is the size of your Ubuntu partition is 47930248 KB which is equal to 46 GB approximately. From this you can conclude that it is your 5th partition(partition which you have marked 5) on which Ubuntu is installed. But I will suggest you to use gparted by running Ubuntu in live mode.


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Windows and Linux name partitions very differently. To identify your partitions from Linux either use gparted (graphical tool) or fdisk (command line) fdisk -l From what you posted, your root partition for Ubuntu is /dev/sda9 sda = first hard drive sda9 = 9th partition Hard to know what is on your other partitions from what you posted. I suggest you ...


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Swap space is essentially disk space that gets used as RAM when your computer is running low on memory. It's not essential to have swap space, but you could run into problems if you don't have any, and most of your RAM is being used. Generally, unless you don't have a reason not to, you should create swap space. Follow this guide for choosing the amount - ...


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Warning: Before performing any partitioning operation (e.g. resizing), make sure you have your data backed up somewhere other than the disk you're using. The problem is that you're trying to resize the partition Ubuntu is running off of. The little key icon next to /dev/sda1 indicates that you can't do anything with that partition, as it's mounted (in use). ...


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I don't understand the advantage of using separate partitions for access control; it doesn't matter what partition the data is on, what matters is the permissions. Linux was designed for this type of access, as was unix. Both are designed as multi-user systems. However, there is a problem with root access allows anyone with root access to bypass security. ...


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To my opinion, the best option would be to create at least two different partitions for each home folder. In that folder you can keep the private files without them being accessed by other users. Then you can either make a third partition for shared files, or give permissions to a specific folder in the main system partition so that you can both access it. ...


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Do not encrypt your entire root. If you need to, encrypt only /home. It's probably the encryption that's blocking things in GParted.


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actually its an issue with windows 8.1 that by default it goes to hibernation instead of shutting down. the solution for me was.... going to "Control panel" -> Power options -> check "show unavailable options" -> uncheck "FastBoot (recommended)" -> save and restart to ubuntu


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that is due to hybrid shutdown in windows , If it is possible to go to recovery menu and restart it from cmd (restart not shutdown as shutdown leaves partitions unreadable ) you can try this on recovery cmd prompt shutdown /s /f /t 0 also if that is not possible then from Ubuntu try to mount partition as read only so you can copy all your files sudo ...


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My suggestion: start over with a clean install and choose those options from the get go. There IS a way to convert ext2 to ext4 but it is a bit involved. If this is a brand new install, might just be easier to start over. Likewise, you can resize your partition but not when it's mounted (i.e. you are booted into it). Use the Gparted livecd or liveusb


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try increasing the write cache size, in in /etc/smb.conf file.


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Wait, what?! You can't find your Ubuntu partition from Windows 8? That is completely normal. Linux in general uses the EXT filesystem while Windows uses NTFS/FAT. Windows (except with extreme modification) cannot read non-FAT/NTFS filesystems.


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Not really sure what partition you mean but so long as you can boot into an Ubuntu livecd and connect to the internet, download gnome and all the extras like gpart and you should be able to click "device" then "attempt data recovery" and recover the partition...be warned though that this really only works on hard drives as ssd's would probably delete it ...


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There's a good chance you only deleted the partition but the file system and data are still there. The Ubuntu community help has a section on restoring it. Please consult it and add additional diagnosis info to your question, if you're stuck. In future it's a good idea to backup partition tables before editing them: sudo sfdisk -d /dev/sda > ...


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Should be as easy as: Step 1: Format the Windows harddrive using software like GParted from your Ubuntu installation. Step 2: Boot/install from your windows installation media. Step 3: Finally, just update the grub list. Note (Someone can correct me on this one):Modern windows installs prefer the hard drive that is being installed to be the first one in ...


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You can use GParted to see how the space is used (and also to resize your partition, but it's a bit more complicated). Another good graphical way to see this is using Disk Usage Analyzer.


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Are you wondering where all the space went? Obviously, it's showing it to be full, and your du command shows only the contents of your home directory, which is not where all the space seems to be used. In order to see the entire filesystem, you need to either start in the root directory (/), or add that to the end of the command: sudo du -h -d 1 / It may ...



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