New answers tagged

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It seems after messing with it for a while, that the hardware made doesn't affect things much in terms of partitioning. If you create a new partition in windows at least, unlike the default system partitions, it won't show up doubled in the linux installer. Now, depending on the distribution you use, it seems like need certain packages in order for linux to ...


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While you can do this, it may be more convenient to use chroot jails to hold your multiple installations of Ubuntu. This has a downside that you will need to use the same kernel for all of your installations, but the upside is that you can use them at the same time, without needing to reboot, and don't need to partition your disks for the individual ...


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I suggest you first install Ubuntu 14.04 and during installation make 3 partitions of 250gb ssd each disk formatted as ext4 and mount one partition as / , also format the other disk where you want to save data as /home . Then install Ubuntu 15.04 in the second partition of 250gb ssd and format it as ext4 and mount it as / and mount the other disk where you ...


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No problem. That is normal when you have 2 or more operating systems. Pretty simple. Assume you have an empty disk and boot into the installation and are at the partitioning setup. create 4 partitions. Ubuntu OS needs a root of about 25Gb that can include a /home/. 25Gb is more than enough if you keep your own data outside of the system (ie. out of / and ...


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I had the same problem. I have a feeling that it is probably a corrupt .iso file. I was having problems with the mate 64 bit Mint 17.3. I then downloaded xubuntu and using the same USB was able to have my laptop ASUS E402MA up and running without any problems. Hope this helps.


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In addition to the existing answers, you may have non-standard/common compatibility and performance use cases that benefit from different partitions. You may want to share data with another operating system such as Windows and need to use a filesystem that both Linux and supports. You may have specialist use cases that allow you to have different tunings (...


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First, a clarification: Your title says you upgraded to 16.04. Does this mean that an earlier Ubuntu had been installed and was booting correctly? If so, what version? This is important mainly to establish a baseline -- if Ubuntu was installed and booting, then we know that your computer is capable of booting it correctly, which rules out certain possible ...


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When you install MS Windows 10, it overwrites the Grub contents in MBR to its own. All your Windows and Linux OS files are intact and good. All you need to do here is to repair you GRUB files. I used boot-repair and it worked very well for me. If you want to fresh install everything, Install Windows 10 first and then install Ubuntu. It is possible from ...


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I know it's a late revival, but hopefully you or someone else could find the answer you're looking for in this post. Guaranteed there are several more like it, too! You could boot up Windows and resize the data partition (which likely has a drive letter, like C:/) from there using disk management which, if memory serves, is done like this: Open up **...


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Regarding Android x86 6.0 The "EEEPC" assignment is only for ASUS EEEPCs, only use it if you have one, otherwise use android_x86, do not use generic_x86, you will get stuck at the boot animation and have to restart by using CTRL+F1 to access the terminal and issue reboot as the GUI will not get loaded. I know this because I spent several hours following bad, ...


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Your initial problem is caused by El Capitan's new SIP/CSR feature, and is covered in the rEFInd documentation: http://www.rodsbooks.com/refind/sip.html The issue you describe in your comment of OS X booting from the Recovery HD partition is simply a matter of how Apple has chosen to name and use its partitions. Originally, Intel-based Macs placed their ...


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Here is the different link that can help you (thank you to Jos and the people who answer this different topic) Using the proper command to restart MysQL Editing your innoDB Files Careful to the Flush command, it might generate error (was the case for me, maybe it was because i didn't do the last step properly) How to make the change works and not crash ...


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You can't "merge" partitions in Gparted. You can create, delete, or resize them. There was no need to format swap partition to ext4. You need to unmount your sda6 partition, delete sda5 and sda7, then expand the sda6. Consider leaving space for a swap partition and do not forget to add the new UUID of it to /etc/fstab. Note: After you move the start of ...


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When trying to resize internal disk linux partition ALWAYS use a LiveCD/USB, because all internal partitions must be unmounted (not blocked by the installed Ubuntu). You are doing that, which is very good. In GParted, right-click on the swap partition and choose swapoff. You can't resize or move it if it's not off (unused). Then move it out of the way, ...


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You may want to investigate how some common encryption schemes like AES work, keys are actually 16 to 64 bytes (maybe 256 or 512?). Having a 10 billion byte passphrase won't really add anything except confusion for you. Also consider that if a government is investigating you, they could search every device & drive you have anywhere (house, car, work, ...


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Depends entirely upon your bios and exactly what level of automation you desire. Suppose.... you have 2 HDD. You can install win on 1 HDD and ubuntu on 1 HDD. When booting, some bios will enable a function key that allows you to select which HDD is the boot HDD for your session. To test this, burn the ubuntu iso to a DVD or a usb stick, and try to boot from ...


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Yes you can choose the disk you want the installer to put Grub (bootloader). You just need to know how to set the partitioning yourself manually. When choosing how to install Ubuntu where the first option is to "Erase entire disk and install Ubuntu", the last option is "Something else" Choose that and you will be presented a GUI to handle partitioning. ...


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In Windows , the equivalent of GParted is the Disk Management app. Just remember that Win doesn't recognize any linux partition. It will graphically show that space as unknown format. Make sure you don't (re)format that space, as it may belong to Ubuntu. You can read Ubuntu partitions from Win by using DiskInternals Linux Reader app. You can (only) read, but ...


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You can also use GParted for this; it will give you a nice graphical display of all partitions; you can also modify / delete / create partitions using it, if you want. You can install it using the Software Center, or by typing sudo apt-get install gparted.


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For some reasons, this device is removed suddenly by kernel or USB controller in non clean way, So it leaves those /dev nodes artifact. It's a USB2 device! As I see the spec data of SanDisk Cruzer Blade.: Capacity 128 GB 64 GB 32 GB 16 GB 8 GB 4 GB Generation USB 2.0 USB 2.0 USB 2.0 USB 2.0 USB 2.0 USB 2.0 It should be a USB2 ...


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You're probably running into this bug: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/grub2/+bug/1091464 If so, two workarounds come to mind: You can disable Secure Boot, as described in more detail on this page of mine. This has the drawback that you'll lose the benefits of Secure Boot, which is designed to protect the computer against pre-boot malware. You ...


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The message about the kernel using the old table, appears because you are trying to modify partitions on a disk that's in use by the system. Either boot from a LiveCD and make the changes you want on your disk or, as Rinzwind said, do a clean install. If this disk is not your system disk, you can also unmount it before you start making this kind of changes....


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I gave a similar answer a few minutes ago: Ubuntu installed, but GRUB not showing up Try out boot-repair-disk . This should fix your problem. And don't forget to save your files before you do that ;-)


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Just keep your Lubuntu installation and add the KDE packages. No need for a second installation or anything else. Be aware - all those thousand Ubuntu-distributions basically use just different default packages - thats all. Therefor if you want another desktop environment, install the related packages and that's it. The following command should be enough ...


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You need to install a bootloader. When you install Ubuntu over Windows sometimes the bootloader gets fudged. /dev/sda1 *or whatever sda(1,2,3,) you are using.


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Try this: Insert Ubuntu Live-Dvd/Usb. Ensure the bios boot order is set to read the media first and start the computer Select Ubuntu Live / Try mode. Click on purple Ubuntu search button - enter gnome-terminal and click on its icon In a terminal run: exec sudo -i mount /dev/sda4 /mnt mkdir /mnt/boot/efi mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/boot/efi for i in /dev /dev/...


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90 GB is simply not enough. As I understood you have 8 GB for swap, so you have only 82 GB free for linux. On my laptop linux 16.04 needs around 100 GB with Standardsoftware only. Therefore ubuntu said the correct: no space on device. One (probable) solution: forget your 90 GB linuxpartition and connect en extern HD vía USB and install linux in the extern HD....


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In gparted first reduce your sda 7 and then select the whole sda3 and reduce it. Then go to Windows and expand sda2 to the newly created unallocated disk space GOLDEN RULE: Never ever touch your windows partition with gparted. Always use disk management of windows.


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As far as I'm concern, you have shrunk sda5, not sda3, so the allocated space (before creating sda7) is still inside sda3, and after being created, sda7 is inside sda3. I suggest you delete sda7, shrink sda3 from the left, then you can enlarge sda2.


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1. If you have Windows installed: You can try VMware vCenter Converter Standalone, as suggested here: http://www.howtogeek.com/213145/how-to%C2%A0convert-a-physical-windows-or-linux-pc-to-a-virtual-machine/. However the tool can only be used on a Windows machine, and you have to register an account on vmware in order to download it. 2. If you only have ...


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Is your /dev/sdb1 mounted? If not, create a directory (i would suggest that you create it in /media/(your username)) and then run sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /path/to/the/directory Also, if you want Ubuntu to mount your Windows filesystem everytime it starts up, add the filesystem entry to /etc/fstab.


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I interpret your answer as "Ubuntu is not booting, when I select Ubuntu in grub (the bootloader)" Boot with a Ubuntu live disk/USB Stick, open a terminal and run sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt chroot /mnt update-grub close the terminal, shut the live Ubuntu down, remove you stick/disk, power the pc on and select Ubuntu


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this seems to be a bug in the system-config-lvm tool. use the command line with lvextend -L +nnG /device resizet2fs /devic it works, even if the partition is the live /


0

Okay, did some digging and figured out that if you used BOOT REPAIR I could probably recover. After installing BOOT REPAIR and allowing the tool to run and restarting the laptop, I was presented the option of choosing Windows or Ubuntu! I have successfully launched Windows! So, now I can NOT launch Ubuntu when I select it!? Hear a sound but nothing appears ...


0

Assuming you HDD is well formatted and mounted in Ubuntu. In other words, you can access the HDD from a file manager (e.g. Nautilus). You can just create the required folders Documents, Downloads, Pictures, etc. on you HDD. And move your files to these new locations. Next, there are some things you could do to make things a little more convenient. For ...


0

I suggest VeraCrypt. VeraCrypt is a port of TrueCrypt but is still maintained. It uses substantially stronger encryption than TrueCrypt ever did. You can download VeraCrypt here. For your stated purpose, you're going to want the command-line version, so install that. Then you'll want to encrypt with a long and impossible-to-remember randomized ...


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Answer by OP I followed the wiki TestDisk 7.0, Data Recovery Utility, April 2015 Christophe GRENIER <grenier@cgsecurity.org> Disk /dev/sdc - 124 GB / 115 GiB - CHS 15102 255 63 Partition Start End Size in sectors No partition found or selected for recovery But this tool testdisk is without doubt most awesome. In the main ...


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exfat should be fine doing so. No read write was happening, the partition does not use journaling The fact that the file system does not use journaling is the exact opposite of "being fine" removing a drive without unmounting it properly. ;) The OS can't easily fix inconsistencies because there is no such journal. Use TestDisk Briefly, your drive still ...


1

The recommended/easiest way is to boot Ubuntu (Studio) from the live USB and either simply let the automatic installer (install Ubuntu 16.04 and let the installer do the partitioning for you) or, when it asks you how you want to partition, click 'Something Else' and use the installer's manual partitioner that comes up. Naturally I would expect that you would ...


2

Traditionally in the pre-UEFI firmware era, the first 512 byte sector on the disk was the Master Boot Record that contained the grub stage 1 loader and the partition table. The following 63 sectors were the BIOS compat region that contained the grub stage 1.5. So, in all there were 64 * 512 (or 32K) reserved at the start of the disk. Nowadays, the reserved ...


0

Figured it out on my own. The "Install Ubuntu inside of Windows" on 14.04.3 is some old Wubi option. As for 16.04, I neglected to mention earlier that before booting up the LiveCD, I resized the Windows partition and left the space unallocated. I did not use the Gparted program to reallocate the unused space before clicking the install ubuntu icon. Well, ...


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I had installed ubuntu 15.04 alongside Windows7 and did not see any such option either. According to me this has to do with Windows7 and not Ubuntu. You can use the something else option to install Ubuntu. First delete the partition you wish to use for ubuntu in windows disk management and then proceed to this link: http://www.everydaylinuxuser.com/2014/05/...


0

Ubuntu Linux can’t access Win10 system drive because Windows does not fully shut down (it actually hibernates). So you have to choose: Do a full shutdown – When you’re in Windows select “Restart” option or hold the SHIFT key when clicking “Shutdown” option. or Disable Fast Startup – Launch Control Panel and do: navigate to Power Options -> Choose ...


2

So which directories are save to put on the SSD? Any directory you want on it. I would advice the whole system and store your private data on a partition on the HDD. Can I move /home to SSD? Yes. I myself only put the directories in /home/$USER/ onto a partition. Since those directories are maintained from a config file (~/.config/user-dirs.dirs) I ...


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If you've got sufficient free (unallocated/unpartitioned) space on the disk, you can use GParted, parted, gdisk, or other tools to create a new partition in that space. The partition must: Be big enough -- I recommend 550 MiB or a bit more, but significantly smaller than that can work. Use a FAT filesystem, preferably FAT32 (a really small partition would ...


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Yes, it's possible. However, you cannot install Ubuntu on a Windows partition (C), you will have to either delete the Windows partition (which means that Windows will be completely gone and replaced with Ubuntu), or shrink the Windows partition in order to make space for an additional Ubuntu partition. During the installation, Ubuntu will offer you a choice ...


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The partition in which your ubuntu os is installed is 7. The file format of the partition is EXT4 which is for linux.


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Looks like it is partition 7, as it's just before swap partition (classical Ubuntu installation), and seems to be the only one in ext4 type. To be sure, open a terminal, as 'root' and type : - fdisk -l : to get all partition tables - mount : to see where your Ubuntu master partition (called "/") is mounted.


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I can help you with the problem. The partitions that you are seeing here are of NTFS format which is compatible with windows. For ubuntu, this wont work. You will have to create an EXT4 partition. You will get this option during installation. For linux systems it is necessary to create a swap partition for better performance. The biggest problem for you is ...


1

If I were to guess, you have a separate partition for /boot. That's not unusual, the installer does that when using LVM. First mount /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-root at /mnt, and then mount /dev/sda2 at /mnt/boot.



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