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0

Try this, I just did this on the weekend for my father in law and it worked like a charm. Hopefully it will work for you as well. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/MountingWindowsPartitions


0

Here is how I think you can fix your problem. Download Plop Boot Manager from here onto your computer with VirtualBox installed Extract the zip file. Open VirtualBox, select the your Virtual Machine, click on "Settings" (The Yellow Gear). On the sidebar settings window, click storage. Under "Controller IDE" click the empty disk (or add one if there isn't ...


0

I'm not sure i understood your question, but i think i did. The reason you can't see the iso on the USB, is because the guest os doesn't have access to the USB. If you're using VM VirualBox you need to turn off your guest os and go to setting, and make sure that usb controller is enabled, then (if i remember right) you can add the USB while the virtual ...


1

Just as in a bare metal system we can also boot our virtual machine from a live CD .iso we had mounted as a CD-ROM to our virtual machine. Make sure you leave the hard disk boot order allowing to boot from CD-ROM first. After that we will boot this machine from a live session where we can access the still attached virtual drive from GParted. Consider ...


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Just keep in mind that Linux does not use NTFS partitions, so if you don't want to screw up your Windows just don't touch them in Ubuntu installation.


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Do you have long-term experience with such a dual-boot setup and can recommend it? Yes and yes. I started using Dropbox just after it started and have been using the same disk space for Windows and Ubuntu. This setup will be my daily driver so it should be reliable. I had some bad experience with dual-boot so I wanted some confirmation that it will ...


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Ummm, if I were presented by this particular problem, I would google on how to use a network bootloader to load a boot image off a networked drive, to then have the machines boot over the network. As for the requirements, you will need standard LAN cards, Cat5 or Cat5e cable, a high speed switch at each floor node (assuming you have a server room located ...


0

/dev/sda4 is mounted at the root of the filesystem, which is what / represents. It's sort of like the root of the Ubuntu filesystem tree, everything else comes under root, unless you specifically mount parts of your system on other partitions. When you type a file path, that first / represents root.


1

/dev/sda4 partition has my OSX boot No, it does not. It is the root system for your Ubuntu. /dev/sda1 holds you EFI boot; that is the one that lets you boot into operating systems (plural!). And are all these other partitions normal? Yes. Do take notice of the "NONE" in the filesystem column. This indicates a partition that is not physical but ...


0

I found the solution. When first installing Linux, I am asked where I want to install the BootLoader (on the partition screen), and the default selection is the live disk itself. I changed that to the drive (SDA), and that did the trick. Looks like it was trying to temporarily write files from the disk to the disk, instead of the hard drive. Hope this is ...


0

Additional information to the first post: before starting the installation, this message appeared: The attempt to mount a file system with type vfat in SCSI2 (0,0,0), partition #1 (sda) at /boot/efi failed You may resume partitioning from the partitioning menu. This pointed me to the link http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2021534 where I discovered ...


1

Open a terminal and type: sudo blkid Find and copy needed uuid to reproduce it in fstab then run: sudo gedit /etc/fstab add to the end lines like this (e.g.): #My-Partition UUID=xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx /media/Robbino1 ext3 defaults 0 1 Where xxxxxxxxxx is /dev/sda uuid that you copied, then reboot. You can also manually change permissions ...


0

I had the exact same problem and could solve it by using the Ubuntu live option and typing "sudo gparted" in the shell (Strg+Alt+T) and then just setting the flag of the Ubuntu partition to boot (right click on the Ubuntu partition and setting the marker to "manage flags"), since the Windows partitions flag was set to boot until then. After a reboot ...


0

You most certainly have to manually create an LVM snapshot if you want one ( using lvcreate -s ). They also are only suitable for short lived use; you can't keep creating one every day and retaining them for the long haul as a means of recovering old data, which is also not at all the same thing as a backup. If you want a backup, then you need to use a ...


2

You only can resize (except expanding by moving the right border; depending on the file system) partitions that are unmounted. Every partition that is in use by your system is mounted. You can see it in gParted when there is this key symbol right to the partition name. So you have to unmount the partitions inside the extended partition (sda5, sda6, sda7) ...


1

First backup your data. Any time you resize you run a risk of losing data. Since you can't resize a mounted partition, Boot from a Live media, Open a terminal and issue the command sudo swapoff -a to insure the swap partition on the drive you are working with isn't in use. Run sudo gparted. Right-click your extended partition and choose Resize/Move When ...


-1

This problem happens to me as well. The way you you fix this problem. First turn off secure boot and fast boot. and if that doesn’t work proceed to the following steps 1.boot from the Ubuntu disk. 2.Click try Ubuntu. 3.Get Boot repair 4. Run the recommended repair. If you need better more clear instructions ill give you the link to the help site ...


0

Choose the option to install beside windows. It will give you the option of resizing windows partition if necessary. Also, you can open Disks or Gparted to see the list of partitions.


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In my version, 14.04.2, I have a slightly different menu in the Disks option to hide partitions. 1 Open Disks 2 Left click the drive with partitions you want to hide (it turns orange) 3 Left click the partition you want to hide (it turns orange) 4 Click the double-cog in the bar below the partitions 5 Click "Edit Mount Options" 6 Turn Automatic Mount ...


4

Okay so I tried and got the same problem. You can get round it by using a IDE controller based HDD rather than a SATA ( which is default ) Edit your VM -> Settings -> Storage, then add a HDD to the IDE controller and delete the SATA controller. Reboot the it should work okay.


0

Mark's answer is very good, but I would personally recommend using Gparted. It will let you see all of your partitions, and if you use it from a live CD or USB, you shouldn't have any errors. If you are new into linux (like me) it would be a good idea to burn Hiren's Boot CD to a CD, it has got many useful tools, and some partition managers amongst them. ...


0

Firstly, you really want to forget using Windows to create drives for Ubuntu, it can't. The '4 partitions' is talking about physical partitions - this can be extended by using 'logical partition', but you don't have to worry about that for now. Windows calls partitions drives, using letters to denote them, and "simple volumes" - these are all nonsense in ...


0

I managed to install Ubuntu, even if not to get the process bar. However it was so quick that I didn't need it! I followed this post http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2021534 and in particular reduced the EFI partition to 200 MB. Hope it helps somebody else!


0

The procedure goes as follows: I installed a fresh copy of Windows 8.1 Pro by buying the app and making a bootable USB drive, as described here. During the Windows setup process, I chose the custom type of installation, in which I was allowed to configure partitions. I erased all the existing partitions (*Be very careful about doing this. You may delete ...


2

While it would be impossible to give a fixed percentage of space you should keep empty, following points may help you to find a range. Also note that most factors depend upon the net condition of drive, rather than the partitions. Fragmentation Linux Fragments very less, so this should be a very vague issue. Performance. Again, there would be very less an ...


0

The partitioning is irrelevant. As long as the filesystem used is either NTFS or FAT you can access files on it from both operating systems (this is due to limitations in Windows).


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If the goal is to have a live ubuntu on flash drive with persistent partition, you do not even need a Gparted Live CD. You can set up partitions first and then install live ubuntu later with usb-creator-gtk. Just boot from ubuntu cd or even use virtualbox to run ubuntu and all can be done in one session. The version of Gparted available for Ubuntu can ...


1

The problem is that you selected to use LVM (Logical Volume Management) when you installed Ubuntu. It provides to functionality to easily resize your Ubuntu partitions. THEORETICALLY! I tried that too on my first install and I found it not so easy. Well, first of all it creates one large partition with all the space you gave to Ubuntu. Inside this ...


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As long as you always mount your separate data partition I can see little if no benefits for the security aspects you mentioned. Any mounted partition including your data partition can be written to by you and by all your applications in case you had the appropriate permissons. A virtualised Windows will however only be able to access you data in case you ...


3

Please read What are "/run/lock" and "/run/shm" used for? and see why what you are asking is not possible and not going to help you create space on / and that you are incorrectly interpreting this data: /run/*/ is a tmpfs; not actual space. Then none in the file system column indicates this is not an actual hard disk. You need to analyse ...


0

Think i just solved the same Problem. When you're asked wheather you want to install Grub to the MBR select 'No'. It seems stupid but this will not cancel the grub-install process instead you will be asked to which device grub should be installed now. Enter /dev/sdX according to your needs I hope this applies. But I guess so as you're talking of a server. ...


1

You can also use gdisk. In my case, it was able to convert a disk with existing partitions and data from MBR to GPT, keeping everything intact. However, YMMV. You can find more information about it on the ArchLinux forums. The process looks something like this: $ sudo gdisk /dev/sda GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 0.8.5 Partition table scan: MBR: MBR only ...


0

I finally fixed it. I had to add the following line in /etc/fstab: UUID={The parition UUID} /media/sdb1 ntfs uid=1000,gid=1000,dmask=027,fmask=137 0 0 and make the links again.


0

I realized that the hard disk has gpt partitioning and not the mbr, so I'm allowed to create up to 128 primary partitions.


0

Yes, this is normal. The installer always displays this message. Check the partition information before you proceed, and make sure that you're installing Ubuntu into the unallocation partition and that your Windows partition will not be affected or overwritten. If you are unsure, then take a screenshot (or a photo) of the partitioner and post it on here, ...


0

Gparted will be needed for the following. And a Ubuntu live USB/CD/DVD. Provided the windows and Ubuntu partitions are next to each other, you should be able to delete the windows partition by right clicking on it and clicking delete, then right clicking the Ubuntu partition, select the resize/move option and using up the space windows originally had.


0

It might be or might not be possible depending on your partition layout. You can install GParted from Ubuntu Software Center and try to delete the Windows partition and make some free space. Then you might be able to Extend the size of the Ubuntu partition. You should do this using an Ubuntu Live CD. You have proceed with caution. You may want to read ...


0

Johnathon I will explain how I installed Ubuntu along side with Windows 7. Just like you I have also used an USB device to install the OS. When the it asks for where to install, i.e, if you want to install along side with windows or to completely wipe the hardrive and install it as new or something else, select the last option and proceed. On the next ...


0

Typically this means that there was an error reading from the disk. In other words, you have a bad sector. You should check dmesg or /var/log/kern.log to see if there are more detailed error messages bout the drive, as well as the SMART health in the disk utility, and if the drive has many reallocated or pending bad sectors, you need to back up what you ...


0

Is it possible to do during the installation? No. That is something you need to do after installation. Possible method: you could add the commands for that to a "preseed" file as "post" installation actions. Is there any reason why it could be bad? Bad? No. But I would not expect it myself. If all you are concerned about is databases in /var/ ...


0

You could partition your SSD and install the OS there. This will give you the quick startup time you desire. What sort of things do you plan to install on the Ubuntu partition? If you run out of space and have to start installing on the slower drive then your speed will be limited to that of the slower drive anyway.


0

The option to limit file size is --max-size=SIZE Where SIZE is your actual file size limit, you can use KB MB or GB as your units. I'm not sure if TB is supported, as a unit, but if you want to test your rsync command use the option: --dry-run


1

If you have two hard drives, then installing Windows on one and Ubuntu (or any other OS) on the other is the most convenient. most modern Windows PC's come with three partitions already installed - a recovery partition, the "System Reserved" partition, and finally your primary Windows partition. If only 3 Primary partitions are defined, create an extended ...


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It actually doesn't matter. As long as you don't need to move Ubuntu or Windows, you're fine. Just add it where you have free space. :)


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When starting the live session, choose "try Ubuntu". Then open GParted via Dash. GParted is a way better partitioning program than the one in the installer. It will give you great visual display and if something doesn't work, it will give you useful information about what doesn't work. Please also notice that (if you have an HDD, so if you have an SSD, ...


3

For that kind of setup, you don't need to do anything special. It's essentially just a normal desktop installation of Ubuntu, so at minimum all you need is one big partition, plus some swap space (usually in another partition). Unless you have any specific requirement that would require something else, I'd recommend just going with the default partitioning ...


1

Sometimes I look at this notice from time to time when installing Ubuntu on different PC devices, just to be sure in case I forgot something. :) I think this is plenty enough about partitioning.


1

This is where things start to become a matter of personal preference and recommendation. Unless you have special purpose for a dual boot system, I found switching back and forth tedious. But that is a matter of style and organisation. I use Virtualbox for those Windows only applications that don't cut Wine and avoid the reboot interruption. The Linux ...


1

To my knowledge, there are no files in Ubuntu which store or are dependent on the physical characteristics of the hard drive. All the information about the partitions is stored in the MBR and other data structures, which are outside of any filesystems (doing otherwise would create a chicken-and-egg problem, right? :)). The only file which comes to mind is ...


1

It would statistically be less safe to install onto two separate drives. If one drive fails you lose half of your data. Conversely, installing both OSs to one drive and keeping the (hypothetical?) second drive as a backup drive would give you a form of redundancy should one drive fail. As far as your system is concerned, it doesn't matter if you partition ...



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