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You can use Boot-Repair tool to set default OS in GRUB. Under advanced menu you can set OS to boot by default and for how long GRUB will be shown. Of course,be careful when using this tool. This probably happens because your partitions aren't mounted at startup, or at least not by same order.


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I could not find any simple solution because all data were deleted and the whole HDD was encrypted but I used TestDisk to recover all data. That helped me :)


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I guess my suggestion was to re install windows. Glad it worked out.


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Had the same problem, disappeared after I used gparted to properly format partitions (root, swap, & home in an extended partition). I followed this dedoimedo's tutorial: http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/dual-boot-windows-7-xubuntu.html I also followed dedoimedo's advice not to take the automatic setup, but chose the 'something else' option. Good ...


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I solved the problem! First i noticed in /etc/fstab that / was mounted with subvol-@ but /home as subvol=@home. So I googled and found the solution. Here are the steps (assuming /home is on /dev/sda2) I did: Create a directory to mount the total partition. sudo mkdir /mnt/old_home Mount the partition. mount -t btrfs /dev/sda2 /mnt/btrfs Copy contents ...


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In addition to the @bigbadonk420's answer, Instead of doing the following: resize2fs -p /dev/vg_blah/lv_blah 9G lvreduce -L -1G /dev/vg_blah/lv_blah Do: lvreduce -r -L 9G /dev/vg_blah/lv_blah Note the -r which reduces the file system simultaneously and is safe.


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Just use an unencrypted swap ... and keep /home encrypted I tried a couple of the other solutions suggested here. Even though they kept worked after a hot reboot, eventually they all failed after a shutdown and cold restart. This tells us we are actually dealing with a double bug: The UUID of the swap drive gets overridden by the encryption system, and ...


-2

The solution is very simple ... Install EaseUs partition in technician mode ... Then go to HDD menue then click with right and chose convert to basic HDD ... There is a risk to loose your files but I have not loss them ... Then you will install ubuntu alongside windows ...


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Disclaimer: I have never used EasyBCD; this answer is only based on EasyBCD documentation pages. Follow the links for further instructions. You can choose to skip any of both bootloaders while keeping both of them installed. Since you mentioned you wanted to keep GRUB, the first option will be more relevant to you. Keep GRUB Set Ubuntu/GRUB (or however ...


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You have to do this in steps, not all at once, and you need to move any free space you want to add next to the partition(s) you want to add space to. First, you need to turn swap off, you can do this from the gparted menu. Next add the free space to the extended partition (sda4) -> apply changes. Then you need to move the swap partition so the free space ...


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Boot into a Ubuntu LiveUSB/CD. Open Gparted and shrink your /dev/sda2/ to have enough space for the Windows installation. Create NTFS storage partition if necessary. Now restart and boot into a Windows installation media in UEFI mode. Assuming that you have a UEFI based system, it would be better to install Windows to an unallocated disk partition. So ...


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No need of commands, use EasyBCD for adding grub again to boot menu. Install windows 7 on a separate drive (Ubuntu previously installed on another drive) After windows installation Ubuntu will not boot. PC will boot into windows automatically. Enter into windows and install EasyBCD for windows Open EasyBCD and select add boot entry. Select grub2 Give any ...


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You might be able to get it back but you'd have to move the whole file system (or all files) to another drive or partition (with enough free space) or an external HDD. Then, remove the encrypted container, and recreate the file system in its entirety without encryption. Finally, make sure that the new file system is properly recognized and that nothing has ...


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I am not sure the cause of the issue, but I was able to work around it by using an older installation (14.04.1) and then upgrade that way...not sure why that worked. Had to enter the setup menu (push the down arrow as soon as you select the boot to USB option and a small white icon appears at the bottom) and then disable 2 options (hit english and then F6 to ...


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Partitions need to be aligned on particular boundaries. Although disk data is referred to in 512 byte sectors, modern drives work on much bigger sectors internally. So having a partition boundary that is not aligned to the disk physical page size can have a very serious performance hit. This is especially relevant for SSD drives. These have page sizes of ...


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It is fairly normal to have a few megabytes between partitions (some software do this purposefully, and as some have said, are necessary to have). To remove these few megabytes you will need to move the partitions above the unallocated space down. This will group the unallocated space so that you can combine the space left over into another partition. For a ...


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It depends on how much Windows needs and we can't answer that here. Ubuntu / can be as small as 10 Gb. If you add 5 Gb for a /home/ and do not create a different partition and do not use that /home/ but put the directories inside it onto the 2nd hard disk you will have more than enough with 15Gb. From Ubuntu's view you can do /dev/sda1 mount as NTFS for ...


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This is how I will do it, 1.Make some free space/unallocated space ( about 50 GB ) by shrinking or deleting volume from current partitions ( using windows ). 2.boot ubuntu installation media. 3.now in the "installation type" select "something else". 4.add 3 partition - i. select type > primary, allocate size > 20GB as ext3/4, mount point > / ii. select ...


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What you can do is to boot live USB, and partition your 500 GB HHD to have an ext4 partition, say of 250 GB in size, and leave the other 250 GB for Windows 8. Once done, boot into Ubuntu normally, and find out the UUID of the partition that you created. For that , use sudo blkid, or sudo blkid | awk '/ext4/ {print }'. Once you know it, edit /etc/fstab to be ...


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This seems to be a bug with the particular version of gparted in Ubuntu 14.04. Repeated failures with resizing fat32 partitions using Ubuntu 14.04 is also reported in this Askubuntu question. The solution (for me) is quite simple. Use Ubuntu 12.04 or earlier versions either on another machine or from a liveusb. I was able to shrink fat32 partitions on ...


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You should not (usually even can not) create any partitions for Ubuntu in Windows. Just give it a bit of unallocated space and the installer will set it up properly. Inside the Ubuntu installer, you (or the installer automatically) will create a root partition (format as ext4 and select: "Use as /") and a swap partition (format as linux-swap"). That is ...


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First install Gparted if you have not already by: sudo apt-get install gparted and resize your 230GB windows partition (NTFS) to make unallocated space (you can decide the size of this partition). Do not make any changes to Ubuntu partition while you are logged into Ubuntu. If you have live CD or USB with ubuntu boot from this and run Gparted from there. ...


1

YUMI Will do this for you there are various ways to approach this issue. I myself use GRUB2 and add what I need. YUMI is a nice out of the box approach though. Why do you want to partition the drive ? you can make each live Disto persistent and it creates it's own space allocation.


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Eventually I ran lsblk and saw that there was a cryptswap1 device under /dev/sda5. Sure enough, /etc/crypttab had the line cryptswap1 /dev/sda5 /dev/urandom swap,cipher=aes-cbc-essiv:sha256 I commented this line out, rebooted, and ran fsck on /dev/sda5, and this time it worked as expected. I'm still not sure why this broke after the upgrade to 15.04, ...


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First, note there is a typo in mount your command. It should be: $ sudo mount /dev/sda2 /media/username Here /dev/sda2 is the device (in this case, a hard drive's partition) you want to access, and /media/username is your mountpoint, i.e., the location in the filesystem where you want to mount the device. To answer your questions: Yes, using cd is the ...


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So, I have good and bad news.. The good news is that I solved, the bad one is that I don't know how I did.. I will write down what I remember in order to be as much useful as I can. I burnt also a dvd to see if the problem was my usb pen, but it turned out also the dvd had the same problem. So I booted again with my usb. Until that, I always created and ...


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On a GPT disk (which is what Macs normally use), there's no such thing as a "logical partition"; that's a partition type that's unique to MBR disks. Some Linux partitioning tools, such as GParted and perhaps the Ubuntu installer's partitioning tool, ask you to identify GPT partitions as primary vs. logical, but this question is unnecessary and confusing on a ...


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It seems I have solved my own problem, albeit through a discredited answer on Ubuntu forums. In fact, the solution is almost laughably easy: holding down the ESC key. No, really, it does work. All you need to do, provided you have an installation disk, is to hold down the ESC key before the GRUB Rescue prompt appears. Then you can directly select your ...


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Your HDD use a msdos partition table that can only hold 4 primary partitions. So your main problem is to make room for another partition on the HDD: this might mean delete(backup before !) a primary partition to create an extended partition and be able to create logical partition inside it. Then once you have room on HDD, you can use gparted (from a live ...


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Maybe this will help you: Privacy in Ubuntu 12.10: Full Disk Encryption


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This is just a hint! Because I came to this question and found an answer by myself. Sometimes you can use ls -lha /dev/mapper/ or similar to see the mapped devices and you can use mount to resolve it.


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Becuase NTFS designed for and by Microsoft. Microsoft rather None Standard solutions for ease of use and home user attraction


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The Microsoft filesystems (NTFS and the FAT brothers) don't support UUIDs the way ext*/btrfs/other Unixy filesystems do. What you see reported as UUIDs are some sort of serial numbers (64 bits long for NTFS, 32 bits long for FAT32). The only concrete information I can dig up from the Linux world is from the ntfslabel(8) manpage: ...


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Because those values aren't UUIDs; they're NTFS serial numbers. They're identified as UUIDs in /etc/fstab (and elsewhere) because the developers chose to use the identifier "UUID" for fundamentally non-UUID data, rather than use some other identifier. The same is true of FAT, by the way, but FAT serial numbers are even shorter than NTFS serial numbers.


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Fundamentally, the issue is not the partition table type (GPT vs. MBR); it's the firmware type and boot mode (EFI/UEFI vs. BIOS/CSM/legacy). Windows ties them together quite tightly -- Windows may boot in EFI/UEFI mode only from GPT disks, whereas it may boot in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode only from MBR disks. Because of this, if you boot the Windows installer in ...


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First, you don't need to worry about such details unless you're designing filesystems, filesystem utilities, etc.; system tools like mkfs create the filesystems you ask in the appropriate way, no matter what the filesystem type. (If they don't, then that constitutes a bug.) If you're asking about this out of curiosity, then you've pretty much answered your ...


0

I found an answer to my problem. I wasn´t able to shrink the windows partion by more than ≈ 7 GB (I think it´s because Windows won´t let you go under 30 GB free space) in Windows 8.1 Disk management. I therefor downloaded Partition Wizard and used that to shrink my SSD to what I wanted (I shrinked it by 20 GB, leaving me with ≈ 15 GB of free space left on ...


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Have you tried using Windows to resize the partition? I have done this several times with Windows 8.1 and it works very well. It will tell you, if resizing is not possible.


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I went back to the Gparted image in your old question SDA1 almost full. What do i do? These are the steps to increase the size of sda1: Step 1: Backup your data to an external medium. Step 2: Boot from the Live DVD/USB and use the Try Ubuntu without installing option. Disable Swap: Open a terminal by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T and enter sudo swapoff -a ...


0

I finally resolved this - without resorting to a third bootloader, and without running boot-repair, which was causing problems rather than fixing them. Maybe my settings were wrong, but I didn't end up needing it. I used 3 partitions for Ubuntu: (1) 1GB for /boot/efi (2) 8GB swap (I have 8GB of memory) (3) root, mounted at / A Ubuntu menu item magically ...


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Update: I didn't provide the full correct solution before; what actually worked for me required to use gparted as well, which you can't use. This method should work (I tested it); you can ajdust each step to your needs and automate everything into the script: Create the blank raw image: dd if=/dev/zero of=/image.img bs=1 count=100000000 (100MB) Create the ...


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Apparently your new home partition was mounted on both /home and /media/home when you ran rm -r /media/home. rm -r removes a directory recursively. It removes all the files in the directory first. It's possible to mount a device on multiple mount points simultaneously. If the new home partition was still (or automatically) mounted on /media/home when you ...


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I'm not 100% positive, but I suspect this is your problem: /dev/sda6 1532825600 1780301823 123738112 83 Linux /dev/sda7 1780301824 1805438975 12568576 82 Linux swap / Solaris Most partitioning tools put at least one empty sector between logical partitions and use that space to store the Extended Boot Record (EBR) that describes the ...


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As far as I can tell your pasted information is from a regular live cd. It says something about squashfs which is a compressed file system that is hardly used in a regular environment. In a menu entry it says something about testing Ubuntu without installing which is a dead giveaway that we're dealing with a live cd. I suspect you didn't install at all to ...


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Do not use the original disk any more! Make a copy of the drive using ddrescue on an identical (or larger) disk sudo apt-get install gddrescue sudo ddrescue --binary-prefixes --cluster-size=64 --sparse --timeout=20s /dev/sdg /dev/sdX /path/to/file.log where /dev/sdg is your disk when you can read the disk, but not its partition table and X is the drive ...


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These instructions worked for me to reformat an 8GB USB flash drive that was made useless after I used dd to write a bootable iso file to the flash drive. I reformatted the flash drive to its original FAT32 format as follows: Remove all of your USB devices except for the 8GB USB pendrive that you want to reformat, so you won't get confused about the device ...


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If you write an file system image onto a medium, the file system won't know, how much space there actually is, so you'll be restricted to its original size, unless you extend it (if the file system type allows it). Additionally, you probably used an image with a ISO 9660 file system, which doesn't support modification at all. If you want to create a ...


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Since you have /home and / as different partitions, you still have /tmp that is part of / and that could be filling up. Check /tmp, or delete everything in /tmp


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By default Steam stores games in your home directory (hence home partition) under ~/.local/share/Steam, not in the root partition - Steam I don't think is made to have games available system-wide. When you install a game it gives you a option to install it elsewhere: As you can see above, I have created a folder extra in the root partition under which I ...


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U don't need to create /boot. If u want have 2 systems, u can install grub on /.(/ would have 10/20 GB) So 2 partition(/,/home) will be good and u can choose where install game on steam. If u have more than 4/8 GB don't create swap cause it ll be not used.



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