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Solution is here You may help you to use E2B(easy2boot)program, it's easy to use, from it you can make bootable USB drives, you can write multi ISOs and DMG files on it. After that you will be able to install Linux, Windows and Mac from One flash drives or use it for AntiViruses and rescue cd or for Multiboot systems, I had problem like yours and I used ...


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Yikes! That sounds bad.... Go into the Unity menu and type disks. This will open an application that will show you all available hard drives and partitions. Look for a partition marked "NTFS". If you see one then press the little play button on the lower left corner and all your files should be there. If you don't see any partition labelled NTFS, then I'm ...


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I was only able to boot with a USB drive with Ubuntu 15.04. I followed the instructions on pendrive linux dot com for ubuntu 14 and it just wouldn't work. For whatever reason, it did with the latest version 15. I do have a gigabyte MOBO though, and I guess they are notorious for being difficult with USB booting. I'd try another DE.


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First, make sure the image was downloaded correctly by checksum comparison. To do this, you need (a) the MD5 hash of the Ubuntu image you downloaded and (b) a MD5 checksum computer for Windows, e.g. WinMD5. Should the sums not match, the image was downloaded incorrectly. This can happen easily. Redownload the image in this case. I recommend using the ...


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system by default reserve 5% memory for superuser . so you can use that memory by reducing 5% to 2% . let up suppose you have 100GB hard disk then system will keep 5GB memory for superuser reserved. it will not use all 5% memory so you can reduce it by 2%. tune2fs -m 2 /dev/sda1 if you are going to create partition and you want to assign less memory to ...


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Boot on the computer with a live USB key/cdrom linux, and from this, use parted or gparted to extend your root partition. You'll not be able to do it from your system as the root partition is mounted and in use.


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Here is a basic walkthrough, if you have questions on individual steps I will try and help. 1) Create a partition. This can be problematic, you may need to make a bootable USB key to do this. I recommend using gparted as the actual tool to make the partition. See this question for why you might need a bootable USB: How to Make a Partition 2) Once you have ...


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Hey there! 10.04 comes with an application called Gparted. You can use it to manage partitions from the live media. So I think live installation is your best bet, plus you get to test the waters of Ubuntu on your old hardware first. Also a prompt will appear when you install 10.04 that asks you to partition your HD with gparted, so at some point during the ...


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the most lightweight desktop environment in Linux is arguably LXDE, so Lubuntu or LXLE are your obvious choices. LXDE is focused on being as lightweight as possible and is especially designed for older computers, netbooks, and other systems with low hardware resources. it's worth mentioning that LXDE is being used in Raspberry Pi board Debian distro ...


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For a system with 512 MB of RAM I can only recommend distros with lightweight desktop environment (DE), such as Lubuntu, that sports LXDE (where L stands for Lightweight). It's preferable to install rather newer versions of OS as it usually supports more hardware. So I would recommend Lubuntu 14.04 LTS (Long Term Support = till 2019, but you can upgrade ...


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How to add Windows from Ubuntu? I assume you mean to the boot menu. Run this in Terminal: sudo grub-install /dev/sda; sudo grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg Is this what you mean?


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You can create partitions on your HDD without erasing any data if there is enough space. You can boot from Ubuntu LiveUSB, start gparted and do it there. You will not need to change boot order in bios. You can install grub on SSD or HDD, that will provide boot menu, where you will be able to choose which OS to start. If you install grub on HDD, then when ...


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i think i may be able to help goto windows delete the partition you created using partition magic or any software like that keep the space without partition goto ubuntu >something else>take that unformatted volume and make 3 volume > 1) / ext4 2) swap atleast same as ram 3) /boot ext4 100MB >install ubuntu grub will take care of the rest..if even ...


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You reported the following error message: Your EFI partition is not in NTFS format. Try formatting the EFI partition to FAT32 This is confusing, since it seems to imply that the Windows installer wants the partition be both NTFS and FAT32 -- an impossibility. In fact, the EFI System Partition (ESP) must be FAT, and Windows wants it to be FAT32. (The ...


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For the most part, installing Ubuntu is no different than installing Linux Mint. Linux Mint is basically Ubuntu with a different desktop environment. As fart as Ubuntu versions go, an LTS version will be the best. The latest one will be supported the longest. While its been a while since I used Ubuntu (I am currently using Linux Mint 17.2), I have had the ...


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It happens because of the partial hibernation of Windows (From Windows 8). I hope you are trying to open a drive from your dual booted system which is shutdowned from Windows last time. A quick and dirty way to fix this problem is, executing the following command on each drives: sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdxx where xx is device and partition letter and number ...


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It is because of Windows fast startup option. You need to disable it. In Windows, open your Control Panel, type "change what power buttons do" and select the link "Change what the power buttons do". Here select the link "Change settings that are currently unavailable", scroll down and uncheck "Turn on fast start-up (recommended)". Restart your computer ...


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Choosing an LTS version is always the best bet, as they're developed and supported for 5 years, rather than the 9 months of non LTS releases. The most current LTS version is 14.04, although 12.04 is still supported, the next one won't be released until April 2016. I favor Ubuntu server editions, as I like to do everything on the command-line and it's less ...


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UPDATE: Actually exFat works perfect for both linux and os X. Wasted so much time. The above solution needs me to add new user in virtual box so that I can switch uid for my working user account. Somehow that it's a problem.


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Seems that the disk has a EFI GPT partition table instead of MBR table. which is not supported by fdisk, so the fdisk would only show a placeholder partition (1-the greatest size). The command to view the partition is actually "parted /dev/sda print". Then the actual start/end/size of the partition would be shown. Yet after mount the disk is not enabled ...


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You move files either by dragging and dropping in the gui file manager, or with the mv command.


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LVM offers features very similar to RAID 0, and is more flexible -- it's easier to combine two disks of different sizes with LVM than with RAID 0, for instance. I also happen to be more familiar with Linux's LVM than with Linux's software RAID, so that's what I'd use in your case. Somebody who's more familiar with RAID might make the other choice, and that's ...


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I/O errors usually (but not always) indicate failing hardware. My guess is that your disk (or some other disk-related component, like a cable or your motherboard's disk controller circuitry) was on its last legs, and the "exercise" involved in installing Ubuntu caused it to fail. You don't say what prompted you to install Ubuntu, but if you were having ...


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First, the instructions to which you link describe using my rEFInd, not rEFIt. The latter has been abandoned for five years, and some details of the page you referenced won't apply if you use rEFIt. Also, the page describes use of rEFInd 0.7.8, which is rather elderly; the current version is 0.9.0. (Although because of Sourceforge problems, not all variants ...


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I believe there is currently no way to reduce the size seen by the guest OS, see http://superuser.com/questions/469780/virtualbox-reduce-max-size-of-dynamic-vdi-hard-disk http://superuser.com/questions/716649/how-to-change-fixed-size-vdi-with-modifyhd-command-in-windows So what can you do? My best advice for a newbie would be to back-up the files you ...


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Free space preceding is used if you are moving the partition to make space for a new partition to the left of the current partition. Free space following is used to create space for new partition that follows (right side of) the current partition. For eg: In the following, I've re-sized my current partition to create 501MB space for a new partition on left ...


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If you have only installed grub once, NTFS keeps a backup of the partition boot sector. And you can use testdisk to restore the backup. Windows may not even see the NTFS partition as grub is in the partition boot sector. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BootSectorFix You want to get to this screen: ...


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Unfortunately, the boot loader (GRUB) installation instructions in that video are a bit confusing because the narrator keeps moving the mouse around and talking about Windows 8; but in a BIOS-mode installation (as in the video), GRUB must go on /dev/sda (the whole disk) or on an Ubuntu partition (/dev/sda6 in the video, but that might not work for reasons I ...


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If you run across this problem and are using the 3.13.0-59 kernel, that kernel is your problem. https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1479093 The issue has been fixed with the 3.13.0-61 kernel. If you do not have access to that kernel, yet, you can run steam using strace -f -o/dev/null steam from the command line and your library will show ...


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As the D630 is an older model I don't believe UEFI has anything to do with it. Double check system requirements here I would avoid unetbootin as in my experience success is rare. I've had excellent results using dd to duplicate the iso to a USB flash drive. The process to do so can be found in here. Basically you just connect the flash drive you wish to ...


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Yes, you can. You can even put your swap space and /boot files on the LVM so you will have two logical volumes: one for the swap space and the other for /.


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Ubuntu installer either runs in UEFI mode or in BIOS mode. If you want both of your hard disks to be detected, partition tables of both should be same. Then boot either in UEFI mode or in BIOS mode (according to your partition table).


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You can not create more that 4 primary partitions in MBR. I suggest temporarily removing /sda3 swap partition. Move left side of /sda4 right. Remove /sda3. Create an extended partition in unallocated space. Create two partitions inside the extended. Format one as swap, the other as ext2 for /boot. Update /etc/fstab with new UUIDs and mount points for swap ...


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Try shrinking your Win partition down using diskmgmt.msc in windows and leave the space you want to install linux in unpartitioned/unformatted/raw/with no file system. Then try your install again - it should now recognize the unformatted space and ask if you want to install side by side or over the whole disk.


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The inconsistency is because you're using the Linux Logical Volume Manager (LVM). GParted can't read "inside" an LVM partition, so it's feeding you misleading information. You don't say why you want to resize your storage space, so I can't be sure how you should do the job. There are two broad possibilities: Using the space within Ubuntu -- If you want to ...


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The Linux fsck utility is basically just a front-end for filesystem-specific filesystem check utilities such as fsck.ext2 (aka e2fsck) and fsck.xfs (which actually does nothing; to check XFS, you must use xfs_check, and to repair it, you must use xfs_repair). If you really mean EFS, then that's pretty exotic. I just checked the kernel configuration utility, ...


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There are some peculiarities about your installation: Your computer has two Windows Recovery Environment partitions, /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda5. My guess is one is from your previous Windows installation and the other is for the new installation, but I can't be positive of that. I doubt if this duplication is causing you any problems per se; I mention it ...


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From the output of your boot-repair command, it looks like you have an UEFI system… However, Ubuntu is installed in non-UEFI mode, and Windows is installed in UEFI mode so only one of the two is going to work at a time without changing the boot parameters… The best you can do is: re-install Windows 10 in non-UEFI mode or reinstall Ubuntu in UEFI mode ...


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It looks like your Windows system was hibernated and not actually shut down. That causes issues for Linux's ntfs3g driver. So, you need to boot back into Windows and shut it down cleanly. In their infinite wisdom, the Microsoft developers decided to make it hard for users to shut down their machines. According to this site, you need to: Mouse over ...


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There is no one-size-fits-all answer for this. You can easily determine the size of the OS as it is now using the df and du commands. The real question however is how much more space are you going to use in the future for the OS ? The size of the OS grows by packages you install and, to a lesser extent, by updates of already installed packages. In the ...


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Did you define a partition. If not it will take some work. I tried installing Ubuntu with out making a partition and it took me a week to fix it.


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You can not create more than 4 primary partitions. You need to remove one of the existing partitions and create one extended partition. Then you will be able to create many logical partitions inside it. In your case the easiest way will be to re-install Ubuntu. Your partitioning is wrong and it will take lots of effort get it right. There is absolutely ...


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lol @ I think I just time traveled back to my childhood. gparted? http://gparted.org/livecd.php Create a bootable cd and use it to select and delete the partitions in question - just dont delete the win 98 partition. once deleted you would have to format the unpartitioned space - u can still use gparted or reboot and use your win 98 to format the ...


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All problems Got solved when I disabled Secure boot from my BIOS setup. Thanks for all the replies though !


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If you download and install the 64 bit version from here and install it from a USB, simply choose the option you are presented with to delete everything and replace with Ubuntu. The installer will take care of the partitioning for you.


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If you are running Windows try creating an 'ext4' partition on the unallocated space. I was facing similar problem with Windows 8 but creating a partition beforehand solved the problem. Personally i use Minitools Partition Manager as the windows partition manager does not allow creating a ext4 partition.


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The sgdisk -v error output summarizes the problem. Basically, the disk is roughly half the size that the GPT data structures claim it is -- the disk's actual size (as determined by the Linux kernel) is 250,069,680 sectors (119 GiB), but the GPT claims that the disk is 457,179,647 sectors (218 GiB). This problem might occur if: You pulled a single disk out ...


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try to format the pen drive as FAT32 using disk utility in Ubuntu. search for disk in dash.


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Try this: Insert the Ubuntu LiveUSB and reboot the computer. The machine boots from the LiveUSB. Click the Try Ubuntu Without Installing icon from the LiveUSB Start menu. Ubuntu boots from the LiveUSB. Click Applications from the top taskbar in the Ubuntu desktop, and then click Accessories. Click the Terminal option. The Ubuntu command-line terminal ...


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The following could provide a solution if your usb drive uses a Linux filesystem. You will need to use the terminal. First, make sure that you have unmounted your device. sudo umount /dev/sdc To check what kind of filesystem your device has, type in the following command: sudo fdisk /dev/sdc You will get a prompt that looks like this: Command (m for ...



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