New answers tagged

0

So I kind of found a solution myself: I changed the permission of the whole directory in the file browser (via right click -> permission), so I managed to recover the data. Thank you.


0

From the screenshot you posted (and guessing from your Gparted output), I think you have the same issue as this one Only 'sdb' shows up when installing 12.04 on a new Dell inspiron 14z


2

You can not move the left border of the extended partition (/dev/sda2) because it contains a logical volume (/dev/sda5) right at its start. Extended partitions are containers for logical volumes, but they are like a box without a bottom. If you would lift up the bottomless box, all its contents would still rest on the floor in the same place. It's the same ...


0

Run the following in Ubuntu's terminal: sudo mount /dev/sdxx /mnt cd /mnt for i in `find . -name *` do if [[ -r $i ]] then echo "$i is ok!" cp -f "$i" "/path/to/different/disk/that/is/uncorrupted/" else echo "$i is not ok." If it does say $i is not ok, you have no chance of recovering that folder.


2

welcome, assuming you are using a 4 gb RAM computer, you will have delete that 500GB patition indicating SWAP , the right click on the unlocated new 500Gb which will appear in grey color and allocated 4 gb as swap by selecting file system as Linux-Swap in G-Parted and click add, the remaining vlume you will create a new file system by right clicking on it ...


3

The reason you cant view it is because its been allocated for swap which is a waste allocating it 500GB its good to allocate it a size equal to RAM size of your PC. Re partition that 1Tb disks 500GB extended prtition in live mode by using Gparted and allocated a memory slightly equal to your RAM size then the rest you can use it for other purposes.doing this ...


2

Here is the easy answer: Open gparted select the right device in the menu Devices go to Device → Create Partition Table Choose msdos If that fails, throw away the USB stick: it's broken now format If that fails, throw away the USB stick: it's broken


1

Here's the VeryEasyWay™ to do this: download the CloneZilla Live CD, boot it use the device to image manual to do the imaging. store the image of the CloneZilla Live CD together with your created in your cloud keep the CloneZilla CD and the HDD you backed this up to as well just in case that your cloud software doesn't exist any more in the future... >:-...


0

If you have Windows startup repair cd for Windows 10.Then used it to solve this problem.This already happen to me , I solved this using this method


0

You've got your order wrong, that's why it doesn't work. Instead follow this: Download gparted live and "burn" that to USB Shut down your machine normally turn it on in your BIOS/UEFI settings, choose to boot the USB (I can't tell you how exactly: this is hardware dependent, look through your BIOS/UEFI manual) Voila: now you can resize the partitions! :-...


0

After booting from your USB Ubuntu, run the following commands: Use (or install on your USB live system if it's not already there) gnome-disk-utility. If it's not already installed, open a terminal and enter sudo apt-get install gnome-disk-utility which will install it. Open it and look to see what disk and partition number your Ubuntu installation is (...


1

You do not have to create a new ESP (EFI system partition). In fact, you must leave the ESP alone as explained in the UEFI Ubuntu help page Make sure you install Ubuntu in EFI mode so you will be able to boot both Ubuntu and Windows from GRUB.


2

You can and should use one EFI partition for all OSes installed. The only concern is if you have many OSes that there is enough space on it. But in most cases this is not an issue since efi files are small.


0

Intro First of all for anyone who is having the same issue on Ubuntu 16.04, it is currently an ongoing bug and as of now, to my knowledge, has not been fixed. You can visit the github conversation here to see the bug I am referencing. Secondly I am writing this post as an enthusiast and intermediate linux user, I am not a developer or currently work on ...


0

I successfully made a bootable USB for Ubuntu 16.04 desktop, from my 2011 iMac, using UNetbootin. The Mac installer link is on that main page. Note that if you want to use it to install onto a Mac, there are further hoops to jump through. This howtogeek article should help.


0

I would: run a fresh installation (and perhaps even use the opportunity to upgrade to 16.04 LTS) restore /usr/local , /home and /srv. This assumes your user ID remains 1000. run a diff between the fresh /etc and the back up of /etc and that will tell you what other packages you need to install and what special configuration changes you need to do.


0

try to use this in terminal sudo apt-get install ntfsprogs sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdc2


0

Problem solved. mdadm have no problem mixing entire disks and partitions given that the partition type is set to 0xFD. Using parted, this in non-intuitive since you need to create an ext2 partition and then use set 1 raid on, which will change the partition type.


2

Just to add something for clarification, usually when you "format a disk" the quick way, the data itself is not erased/destroyed - rather, the partition table where the map to your data was, is. The more you use your disk after the partition table is erased, the more you are overwriting the previous data, and making it harder to recover. As was pointed out ...


0

You are allowed to make a maximum of 4 primary partitions in a Disk thats why it cant create a 5th one. The solution to this you can use a partition tool like gparted which comes in ubuntu live cd or even bootable flash drive and create an EXTENDED PARTITION by choosing Create As : Extended Partition instead of Primary Partition


5

First of all, I'm going to explain what I think you did, so there aren't any misunderstandings which may lead you to lose your data, so please object if there is anything wrong. Before installing Ubuntu, the hard disk in question contained two partitions. The first one you call "C", with Windows operating system files on it and a second one you call "D" ...


3

When you format a disk, data is removed from that disk. What did you expect? Restoring a backup would be the best method. Some people have had results using the datarecovery help using testdisk, but that really depends on what you did to the disk after the installation. The more you use that system, the less likely it is to be able to recover what was ...


1

/dev/sdb is the entire block device, you don't mount this. You mount a partion that is on the device, example: sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt From the first image, it looks as if there are no partitions on the disk any way, or you have recently made some changes to the partiton table and the kernel is not aware of them, so it is best to run sudo ...


1

New hard drives need to have a new partition created on them so that they can be used. I recommend using gparted. To install the program, type in the following from a terminal window: sudo apt install gparted Then gparted needs to be ran with elevated permissions: sudo gparted After your drive is configured, now you need to mount it somewhere. If ...


0

The file system of Ubuntu is not recognized by Windows. There are applications out there that will allow you to mount the Ext4 file system. Do NOT overwrite the MBR as that will prevent you from booting into Ubuntu. EDIT: Here is a helpful link from HowToGeek that will give you 3 applications to mount the drives, but you can only use them as read-only (...


0

You could try overwriting the MBR of the pendrive, with: sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/YOUR_DISK bs=512 count=1 You can check the device of YOUR_DISK with sudo fdisk -l. Notice that with this, you will lose the contents of the pendrive, but it should be detected again after that. You will have to format it again afterwards.


4

I Would do this: Change to ROOT mode from a Live CD/USB Preferrably, if not it will still work from a dual-booted Linux install. Open a terminal and type: sudo -i Then, find out which partition is your Windows via this command: fdisk -l Mine shows this: /dev/sda1 * 2048 206847 204800 100M 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT /dev/sda2 206848 ...


0

Make a backup of any wanted personal files before you begin. Install from iso media such as a USB or DVD. If you want to use the same partitions, select "something else" when it asks if you want to install ubuntu "along side" your current operating system. Then, click on the main ubuntu partition (make sure you know which one it is!) and set the "type" as ...


0

Assuming that you have no user files that you wish to save and considering the fact that this is a recent install --- start over. After re-loading Ubuntu visit this site: Partitioning/Home/Moving which will provide guidance so that you can use the same partition system you previously established. I don't have any advice on restoring the files that were ...


0

Gparted is a great tool for partitioning your HDD/SSD. Get it here: sudo apt-get install gparted Here you can change the format of the free space.


0

I have a dell laptop, and the default windows partion is called OS. I think this is so your laptop will boot from the partition as maybe the laptop is restricted to only booting from a specific partition. I am proabaly incorrect. It also seems like it has boot files so don't delete it


0

You found the initial problem that was causing Ubuntu emergency mode. It was trying to mount a dirty Windows partition in fstab. That happened because the NTFS file system was "dirty". It needs a chkdsk run on it from Windows, or, delete the NTFS partition from Ubuntu using gparted, and recreate the NTFS partition from a running Windows system. Cheers, Al


0

Thanks @Curtis Gedak for your comment! From the GParted screen shot I assume that the partition you deleted freed up ~78 GiB of space between logical partitions sda7 and sda8. This makes it easy to grow sda7 to use the extra space. If you need to grow sda8, then that requires first moving the partition to left, then growing the partition which is ...


0

Ok, I just resolved: first I commented out the windows mounting instruction for the boot /etc/fstab, then I was able to start the system normally.


0

I have figured out what happened. Either of two things: 1) I messed up the partition table or 2) something else messed up the partition table and after a reboot there was NOTHING to be done. Here's what I should have done when one disk of the raid1 died: check the raid status with cat /proc/mdstat make sure the drive is really dead mdadm examine gives ...


0

Found the solution. My motherboard is the Asus X99 Sabertooth. I had secure boot enabled and that was what was screwing with Ubuntu. For anyone with the same issue here is how you disable secure boot for newer Asus Motherboards.


-1

I have no experience with Btrfs (more experience with ZFS) but for attention to partitions, the first utility that comes to mind is gdisk(8). GPT fdisk text-mode partitioning tool An outline: $ sudo gdisk GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 1.0.1 Type device filename, or press <Enter> to exit: /dev/sda Partition table scan: MBR: protective BSD: not ...


0

This workaround worked for me: Shutdown the machine Create a new drive via the admin interface with the size you want Use VBoxManage clonemedium with the --existing flag Not sure why the VirtualBox guys couldn't use the above to implement this instead of throwing VBOX_E_NOT_SUPPORTED... at least link to this :)


1

I think you're getting the "out of space" message because the Live USB stores all your files (including Steam and any other programs that you installed previously) in RAM, and your computer is running out of space in RAM! Try rebooting (which will reset everything and free up your RAM), and boot into the Ubuntu USB installer and start the installation ...


0

Get your disk UUID: blkid Edit /etc/fstab as root: UUID="XXX" /media/root/nowhere auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,noauto,nouser,x-gvfs-hide,x-udisks-auth 0 0 Create a protected /media/root folder (to prevent users to access the partition if mounted): sudo mkdir -m=000 /media/root Several independant layers of protection against mounting and visibility: ...


0

LUKS only encrypts one device, so you could put LVM outside of LUKS - creating a LVM out of the multiple drives, then use LUKS inside it. The installer can't do that automatically, good guides abound on the web saying how to do it, could be rather long.


0

Reinstalling the faulty kernel, as advised here, didn't work. Removing the faulty kernel worked, as explained in this other answer.


0

Do you have apropriate rights to write to mongodb data directory - user which starts mongod has rights to write to mongodb data directory ?


0

I backup my files to another disk using Redo image and then format and restore my file to my disk.


0

There is many approachs.. For now I only describe one method. 1) Run a live distro of Ubuntu from CD or USB. Backup your system (Ubuntu) ext partition and other partitions contain any data,except boot or any small partitions designed for your bootloader.generally these are at the very beginning of disk. You can use ubuntu's built-in tools like gnome-disks ...


0

There are many ways to do so, most of them relying on dd and resize2fs behind some frontend if you don't want to do it manually. I would recommend CloneZilla, which will also resize your partitions and write new partition table.


0

I suppose the MongoDB data directory is full. Please check the configuration file of MongoDB and find the data directory and see whether there is enough space in it.


0

I've done this with external HDDs using Ubuntu 16.04, 14.04 and 12.04, I'm assuming that is what you're attempting. I recommend using these as a base to troubleshoot from, then if needed remount the drive. I start with Gparted to identify the device, usually its /dev/sdb1 or similar. Then I find the device, there is a drop down in the top right (at the ...


0

Below are some examples. lvs -o +devices lvdisplay -m lvdisplay | awk '/LV Name/{n=$3} /Block device/{d=$3; sub(".*:","dm-",d); print d,n;}'


0

None of the suggestions worked but I found the solution for me. When the installer asks how to partition, choose Manual, after that: Select /dev/nvme0n1, it will ask if it should create a new partition table(only the first time) - accept that. Select free space and choose to create an EFI boot section(in different tools this could be called differently ...



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