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A few options may be. http://www.acronis.com/en-us/business/backup/linux-server/ http://www.r-tt.com/free_linux_recovery/Download.shtml http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk http://www.easeus.com/data-recovery/data-recovery-software/linux-ext2-ext3-data-recovery-freeware.htm To prevent future issues try a program called TimeShift to create backups ...


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Install ntfs-3g sudo apt-get install ntfs-3g And repair ntfsfix /dev/sda3


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If you've exhausted all windows recovery methods available with a startup disk, then it may be that your only choice is to reinstall, but it is possible that all your data is still there, so reinstall windows on the same partition And all uncorrupted data will be in the C://windows.old folder. In my case, I still had everything, nothing was corrupted.


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You don't need to partition your hard drive and leave unallocated space. Just choose install ubuntu alongside windows option and then set the amount of space you want for ubuntu using the slider.


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Gparted is unable to read the partition table of your HDD. Take a back-up of your HDD, then boot to Live Image, open the Gparted,and go to Device > Create partition table. ** Note that the by creating/recreating the partition table you'll lose all your data on the Hard Disk. So make a Backup first. Do it on your own risk. **


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In my experience, I always tend to go overboard with the size of the root partition. I also tend to assign 40-50 Gb to root, but I'm beginning to doubt that much space is actually necessary (correct me if I'm wrong). I'm currently running Kubuntu 14.04 on a new machine for about 6 months, and have installed as much software as I'll ever need (VirtualBox, ...


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Test this: Open a terminal by hitting Ctrl+Alt+T. Run the following commands: sudo -i apt-get autoremove apt-get clean apt-get install --reinstall deborphan aptitude deborphan aptitude --purge remove `deborphan` deborphan –-libdevel aptitude --purge remove `deborphan --libdevel` dpkg --purge `COLUMNS=300 dpkg -l | egrep "^rc" | cut -d' ' -f3` ...


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Without more details about your system, I really can't help you with what to remove. Plus, they're your files and thus you'd have to make the final decision about what to do with the space anyways (deleting files, etc.) What I can do, however, is show you a quick way to get a graphical breakdown of all of your files and the space they're taking. Open ...


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The Internet is filled with warnings to not do what you did, but you're right that there should be a warning in the program itself. Posting about it here will do no good, though. You may want to file a bug report to get such a warning inserted into GParted. As to repairing it, I've heard that it can be done, but you're better off asking about that on a ...


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Ordinarily, each filesystem partition that you want to access in Linux has a unique mount point; you can't simultaneously mount two partitions at root (/). Furthermore, you can't use an NTFS volume as your Linux root (/) filesystem. If you want to access your Windows partition from Linux, you must give it some other mount point, such as /mnt/windows. Because ...


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My recommended solution is: Download the USB flash drive or CD-R version of my rEFInd boot manager. Prepare a boot medium from this download. If it's not already disabled, disable Secure Boot. (You can re-enable it later, if you like, although you'll probably need to jump through some extra hoops to do so.) Boot rEFInd. You should see at least one option ...


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The warnings and errors concerning a corrupt/invalid GPT (GUID partition table) pertain to a 2 GiB drive, so probably neither the hard drive nor the SSD, and can be safely ignored. Unfortunately that doesn't explain why Boot-Repair doesn't fix the boot loader. To resolve your issue, I recommend a manual re-installation of Grub, which will be slightly more ...


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You'll only lose data if you shrink the partition too far. Use the Windows partitioning tools to shrink the partition a safe amount. Doing this manually with a such limited space is dangerous. How to do this: Click on your start menu and type in "defragment". A tool for this will appear. Select it, and defragment your hard drive (this is to get the maximum ...


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I have broken a system by shrinking the Windows partition using Linux tools. (I asked about it in this question.) Based on my experience, I would advise shrinking the Windows partition using Windows tools, then moving over to the installer. That said, this is a mighty small drive you are working with, and you may run into trouble because of that.


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Resizing a hard-drive would not cause data loss. But 40GB hard drive is not meant to be shrinked so as to install another OS. I assume you are a Windows XP or Windows 7 user. Windows would require free space so as to accommodate new programs, page file changes if any etc. Hence, I request you to think again before you proceed toward installing Ubuntu.


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I found out the reason why this didn't work, i erased the EFI partition, and i was trying to boot in UEFI mode, and (don't know why) even without UEFI boot, it woldn't boot, so i created an EFI partition, and now i can boot to ubuntu :P before this, i tried to do something (which went wrong): I had a backup.tgz, and extracted it to my disk, and some files ...


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Please check where the /mnt folder is mounted and check? can check it with command df -h OR mount and post your output this will help to solve your problem soon. The error tells that /mnt/iso folder is not formatted to a filesystem. OR Try mounting it using a GUI. Navigate to the *.iso file using a file manager, then Right click -> Open with Archive ...


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Okay so after waiting 3 hours I went to sleep and when I woke up it was completed. Didn't know it would take this long but it did. Now I can download games from steam :P


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Yes, it's definitely possible and the Ubuntu installer allows it when choosing the option "something else". Just plan the partition layout of both drives accordingly. You can create the partitions beforehand with GParted, if you feel more comfortable with that tool. In my personal experience, the Windows installer doesn't like some partitioning schemes ...


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You have to expand the extended partition (the light blue one, /dev/sda3 in your case) first. Then you will be able to expand /dev/sda5.


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Since the automatic ways aren't working, I tried googling for "manually add windows to grub" and found this. The linked answer suggests the following: The first step is to edit /etc/grub.d/40_custom (using SUDO) and add the following lines to the bottom of the file: menuentry ‘Windows 7′ { set root='(hd0,msdos2)’ chainloader +1 } Then running sudo ...


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You don't need to run anything from the command line as gparted takes care of this all for you. Simply resize the partition in gparted. You will first need to move sda11 over so that the free space follows sda10 before you can grow it.


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Using gparted, select your USB disk in the right top drop-down. Please be careful, since the next step will remove any data in your USB stick. After that, unmount any active partitions and go to Device > Create Partition Table.... Then select msdos and Apply. Finally, create a new partition using the filesystem you want (usually FAT32) and Apply All ...


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1. Re-install Windows 7 by re-partitioning your whole hard disk, which means delete and re-create all partitions. Then select an specific partition for Windows 7 installation. After that, use any partition manager (EaseUS Partition Manager) and convert all your partitions to LOGICAL, except the partition where you installed Windows 7 (it should be PRIMARY) ...


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You can use BIOS to select other HDD as primary, then install Ubuntu on it. Then from BIOS you can easily switch in between HDDs and boot into Windows or linux


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Unless you use Wubi, you need to install Ubuntu in a separate partition. Alas Wubi is deprecated and unsupported by Canonical and doesn't work at all in UEFI environments. Please perform a regular installation and choose "alongside Windows". While there is no practical risk, that Ubuntu damages your Windows installation or data on Windows partitions, both ...


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There is no such thing as 'not prompting to re-partition the HDD' in a OS installation. Even if your HDD wasn't detected, the setup would warn you about it. At the Installation Type screen, you can choose Something else and define your own partitions for Ubuntu setup. It would be best to use this option rather than choosing to install Ubuntu alongside ...


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For a beginner I would recommend disconnecting the 1 TB from the motherboard while installing windows and ubuntu on the SSD. I would partition the disk before installing either OS. Also for a beginner I would install windows first. Then install Ubuntu. If you are not a beginner and are versed in partitioning disks and OS installs then disregard the previous. ...


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Windows always needs to be installed on the first partition of the first drive of the computer... (and that's what you get from a near-monopoly) So you need to install Windows first and then Ubuntu. :-(


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Have a look at this post: How to Install Ubuntu 14.04 with RAID 1 using desktop installer? It worked for me. For those who want to use the RAID array only for storage (for example, only for the /home file), you can use the graphical installer, install GRUB on the device with / and the swap, provided this one is not a RAID array, and then do the chrooting, ...


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Though this post is a little bit old, Here is another solution, which is, in my opinion, the best (I have tried install with a server edition, and it is simpler with this other tuto): Have a look at this post, and a more accurate one at its answer: How to Install Ubuntu 14.04 with RAID 1 using desktop installer? BUT this post is to use the ONLY RAID array. ...


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Wubi? I'm pretty sure that wasn't supported for 14.04...do you mean the 'Install Ubuntu alongside Windows' option? However, Helio is right, you can't really modify a partition size once it's made. So, you need to: Backup everything (Windows and Ubuntu) using the backup tools (search 'Backup' in the Dash and Start Screen/Menu) to some large storage that ...


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Yes, the changes are persistent if you install to a partition. Your laptop can be messed if the partition you install Ubuntu in has any information that you want to use after the install.


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Attach the HDD to a Windows machine (or boot Windows) and run: chkdsk X: /f where X is the drive letter under Windows.


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You might have a slight chance of recovering your data if the recovery partition was at the end of your disk using this answer. Otherwise, contact the manufacturer of your PC and ask them to send you a "recovery DVD". This recovery DVD will wipe your entire drive, so back up your data before continuing!


3

Your sda4 "extended" is sort of secondary partition table. If you are not planning to use more than 4 partitions in the future - and it looks like you don't, as you want to assign all the available space - just delete it, and then extend your sda3. In other words: sda4 is not an actual partition with files, and you don't have to worry about merging any ...


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I am going to safely assume you are dual-booting Windows & Ubuntu, in this case using a DVD is recommended. Install Windows and Activate it When Installing Ubuntu, it will tell you about the detected Windows Partition In That Select Install With Windows or something of that sort..... Leave about 100 - 200 for Ubuntu Install as Usual and Boot, if ...


0

The easiest way to copy files is to use the icon that looks like a file cabinet: in the left upper corner of your screen. That is very similar to the Windows File Manage your already know. cp is very similar the the Windows copy command so choose whichever you're comfortable with.


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What you're trying to do is non-standard. There exists a Filesystem Hierarchy Standard that describes where every and all software must reside. That being said, this is your Personal Computer, so you can do whatever you want. ;-) I would install according to the standard and then copy the application/data to it's own home directory. sudo cp --preserve ...


3

Is current user in your group "users" ? Try groups command. If its not, than use sudo adduser USER-NAME users and then reload your session. Isn't /media/data1/test file already there (owned by someone else)? Try ll /media/data1/test. Are those partitions mounted without any restrictions? Try mount|grep /media/data command. Mind to share outputs of these? ...


0

fuser /tmp only shows processes belonging to your current user accessing /tmp/. It doesn't show processes belonging to other users, and it doesn't show processes just accessing files inside /tmp/. Use sudo fuser -m /tmp/ to show any processes accessing any file on the file system mounted on /tmp/.


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This can be solved mostly with GParted from a LiveCD: You can temporarily disable the swap partition, which GParted should allow you to do through the partition context menu. Otherwise use sudo swapoff /dev/sda7. Now you can delete the swap partition. This is safe, because (disabled) swap partitions hold no useful data. Re-arrange and grow your ...


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It shouldn't be a problem; Start by shrinking D: from Windows, with disk checks & backups.. Then in gparted, move sda5 to the end (it probably won't be after the shrinking, then shift swap along to meet it, and enlarge sda6 to fill the gap. The partition numbers are however out of order; are you sure that's the order they're actually in? There will be ...


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AFAIK you can't have multiple different block devices (as indicated by the different UUIDs) mounted to the same filesystem mountpoint /media (at least not without some kind of overlay filesystem). You would need to create separate mountpoints such as /media/disk1, /media/disk2 and so on, and then modify your fstab file to something like # /media was on ...


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Edit /etc/fstab and delete all those $ at the end of the lines.


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(dropped down from comments so I could use a picture) Here is a picture from the Windows partitioning tool of the partitions on a pc. Take a look at the middle drive (Windows calls it G). My Ubuntu partition is the 482 G partition on that drive, the 3rd one. If I shrank the first partition on that drive, the 1374 G one, I couldn't expand my Ubuntu ...


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There are many ways for it, here are my favourite ones- Type in the terminal and press Enter: cat /proc/swaps Type in the terminal and press Enter: swapon -s Type in the terminal and press Enter: free


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Since I wanted to focus on fast booting and starting programs, I decided to try the following: SSD: OS installation, /usr and /opt for programs HDD: /swap, /var, /home I decided to have /var on the HDD as well because I have rather big databases in the /var/lib/mysql and also my /var/www is quite spacious. So far this is working fine. Booting and starting ...


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Just install it just as on a normal "HDD". If you want to you can optimize the SSD but it's NOT necessary (as long as you are not an enthusiast, I would leave it as it is). Here is a installation guide (in case you need one): http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/install-ubuntu-desktop


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Actually there were no badblocks in sda3 but I found many in sda2. All my stuffs were in sda2. So this read only behaviour was arising only when I was using sda2 like listening to music, working on a project etc. Reading these badblocks in sda2 was causing remounting of sda2 as read only filesystem. Can I tell fsck not to read these badblocks on sda2(it is ...



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