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1

Here is the general approach you would be taking. You first have to boot into a live Ubuntu environment. To do that, burn an Ubuntu image on a CD/DVD/USB and boot from it as if you're installing Ubuntu but choose "Try Ubuntu" instead of "Install Ubuntu", then open GParted. Right click on sda5 and Delete. So you'll end up with sda6, sda7, followed by a big ...


0

If you really formatted the /dev/sdb, then you wiped out the original partition table. You should then be able to mount the /dev/sdb with the loopback option to mount, but since there's nothing on the disk, forget that and just run a disk partitioning tool and create a new partition table -- forget trying to "erase" or format anything, the raw filesystem ...


0

Maybe the "Micca Spect media player" you mention did some formatting of the HD on it's own, I'm not sure if you were trying to use the HD with the player already. And does "The installation went well and I booted into Ubuntu (14.04 LTS with full drive and home folder encryption)" refer to anything that was done to the HD in question? I wouldn't use Disks ...


0

No, there is no special tool or parameter for that. You probably should not do that, anyway. You should leave some unused space on your volumegroup, so that you can grow your logical volumes in case of an emergency (space runni.ng out on your / partition if you install updates, space running out on database, etc.) You also want free space on your ...


0

For Windows 8.1 on Surface Pro 3, we found it was very important to choose the EFI partition (for us also /dev/sda2 (not default /dev/sda). If not, the GRUB menu did not appear. Another helpful hint for Surface Pro 3. When is loads directly to Windows, to get to Ubuntu you can also go to Update and Recovery screen and then select Restart Now. This ...


0

The partitions look alright. I would put the boot loader on sdb though, because it's faster and that's where the operating systems reside anyway.


1

Multiply your count by 2. If 1048576 blocks with a size of 4086bytes each = 2GB then, 2097152 blocks with a size of 4086bytes each = 4GB **For anyone else reading this, the above values are not accurate. They're based off the values given by the OP **


0

I can barely follow your full question, so I'll just answer the "Input/Output error during install through USB", assuming it's a USB input/output error. If you could post the exact error messages (should be some in /var/log/syslog or dmesg, maybe even with lsblk to see which drive is which) that would help show if it's USB errors or HD errors. I get ...


0

The solution was to install Linpus Linux first. Then it was possible to install Ubuntu and to see partitions on the disk without problems.


0

I was searching for an answer to the exact same question, since I am more or less in your situation with 128GB SK hynix SSD drive on DELL XPS 15 (L521X). On your question - I would suggest to check your BIOS for onboard SSD disable function available, and then disable the drive for good. (this may also include BIOS update)


0

I saw a post in Lifehacker that shows how to do it with OS X Snow Leopard. I tested in my Ubuntu 14.04 and it worked pretty well. You have to use an OSX86 ISO and your CPU needs to support hardware virtualization, or else this will not work. Lifehacker article mentions that you'll be needing around 1 GB of RAM and that the virtual hard disk size should be ...


1

It should be possible to boot the external drive automatically only when the external drive is connected. Just install windows to the external drive and set the external drive or USB (if it connects via USB port) as the first bootloader device in the BIOS settings. When the drive is not connected, the next bootloader device (internal drive) will ...


0

To install them I create a / and a /home partition for each distribution, but the EFI boot partition which is created by W8 at the begining of the disk is unique. Looks good to me, I would have done the same. Is there any problem with installing various linux bootloaders in the same boot partition (maybe because kernels get mixed or something)? ...


0

Yes it is: For Windows with Ubuntu dual boot: Assuming that you had installed Ubuntu after installing Windows, such that Ubuntu is on the upper end of this disk, you would therefore want to reduce the size of your Ubuntu partition to provide free unused space for the overprovisioning. GPartEd free tool that comes with Ubuntu is ideal for this. If you need ...


0

you have to run sudo update-grub from the OS that created grub (probably ubuntu-studio) otherwise, use bootrepair help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI#Converting_Ubuntu_into_EFI_or_Legacy_mode Installing Ubuntu on a Pre-Installed Windows 8 (64-bit) System (UEFI Supported)


0

This is not really an Ubuntu question, but an Elementary OS question, but Elementary comes with its own version of grub, so I would: Take a full system backup using CloneZilla Take another backup with your current backup Boot Elementary OS, delete the Ubuntu system partition Recreate a new partition with the same settings as the Ubuntu partition be sorry ...


0

/dev/sda1 is your root partition, which indeed can not be unmounted while Ubuntu is running off of it, because this is where the operating system is. What I usually do in such cases is to boot from a live CD (my favorite is systemrescuecd) and then resize the partition while it is not active.


0

Yours sounds like a complicated situation, I'm not sure what shape your hard drive & Windows partition is in, being able to see it in a live Ubuntu, but the Windows disk not seeing it... I would try (running a live Ubuntu cd - "try without installing") to mount the windows partition (mounted read-only = ro just in case) and take a look at the files, see ...


0

You cannot change a mounted and active partition! It is dangereous! To do that, boot from a live disk (CD, DVD or USB key), and run from there gparted. And, please, never ever do that again from a running system.


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/boot - 200m primary. / - 20-25g. /home - 30g or higher for virtualbox disk files. swap - 2 multiply of ram. If you often install a new distro, I recommend to separate 1 empty ext4 partition for special programs or their configs --such as virtualbox disk files, your projects, etc. Because some distro installer may be unstable and your home data may be ...


0

Your problem is that the space character between "if=/Macintosh" and "HD/Users/nickzieno/Downloads/ubuntu-14.04.1-desktop-amd64.img tells your shell that it has TWO parameters. Either quote the whole thing (sudo dd "if=/Macintosh HD/Users/nickzieno/Downloads/ubuntu-14.04.1-desktop-amd64.img" of=/dev/rdiskN bs-1m) or use backslash to escape the space ...


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Given the low usage parameters, installing your required software packages in the default locations should work fine. I don't see any advantages to breaking out the processes between VM's unless your usage of any particular app suite continually loads the server to the point of impacting the other services/


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I have recovered the 175GB of space by using BleachBit (as root). Tick all the boxes.


0

First you have to create a new partition on sdb with fdisk. You have to format this partition with ext4 (or any other filesystem type you want). To move all the data I recommend you to boot from a LiveCD/LiveUSB. Mount sda2 in /mnt/sda2 and sdb1 in /mnt/sdb1. Then copy all the data from /mnt/sda2/home to /mnt/sda2. Finally you have to edit the ...


0

You can use GParted for this. But you cannot tamper the partition on which the ubuntu is running. That means you need to boot from a live cd. Use a live cd or create bootable pendrive using lili. And boot from it. Then using GParted, you can edit the partitions. Feel free to delete create or shrink partition, but be carefull when you hit the apply button. ...


2

When typing on a command line, a $ represents the prompt, you should not type this directly in front of sudo, nor anywhere at the beginning of that command.


0

If your windows 7 running with Enterprise/Ultimate you can use Bitlocker to encrpyt it and for Ubuntu you can use LUKS,


3

Your input file name contains a space character so you need to use quotes. And it has to be bs=1m instead of bs-1m: sudo dd if='/Macintosh HD/Users/nickzieno/Downloads/ubuntu-14.04.1-desktop-amd64.img' of=/dev/rdiskN bs=1m


0

I ran into this problem with writing onto an old drive that had been written as a live linux disk. Solution if you just want to erase the disk /dev/sdX: sudo parted /dev/sdX o (agree to delete partitions) w (agree to write partition table) And then you have a perfectly blank drive. All that remains is to create a partition if you want to use ...


-1

If you want to work with the installed tools, you could use du -sh /* which shows you the accumulated usage for each folder (and file) in / You can then do this for subfolders until you found what you are looking for. Of course, the tools mentioned in other answers are much nicer, but sometimes you can't easily install them.


4

Use the ducks: du -cks *|sort -rn|head -n11 This will list the top ten subdirectories and files in the current path and the space they are using, and a total. If you change the -cks to -cms it reports in MB's instead of KB's, which is probably more useful these days. You can add x to the options on du to prevent it going into other file systems, if ...


1

Check out SystemRescueCd - it is a special purpose distro created for problems like yours. You will need to burn it on a CD or make a bootable USB. Then you need a second computer/laptop. Remove its hard disk, install the disk you want to recover data from and boot SystemRescueCd The Windows7 system files are probably on the system recovery partition. ...


0

Your best option is GParted live. I imagine you will need to incorporate the free space into the other partitions after you've deleted them. GParted live can merge, delete, create, pretty much all the possible functionality. Better to use the live version than the desktop one. Make sure you get acquainted with it first before you use it, a couple of YouTube ...


14

ncdu If you use the command line, you could use ncdu. It uses a command-line GUI (ncurses). Installation sudo apt-get install ncdu Description From its webpage: [...] ncdu: A disk usage analyzer with an ncurses interface, aimed to be run on a remote server where you don't have an entire gaphical setup, but have to do with a simple SSH ...


6

Another very useful app for this is: JDiskReport Is very similar to windows SpaceSniffer and has very useful IU. You need java to use it An image to see how it works: Hope it helps !


19

One nice Gnome application is baobab sudo apt-get install baobab apt-cache show baobab Description-en: GNOME disk usage analyzer Disk Usage Analyzer is a graphical, menu-driven application to analyse disk usage in a GNOME environment. It can easily scan either the whole filesystem tree, or a specific user-requested directory branch (local or remote). ...


0

I actually just ran the live cd and installed ubuntu on my new harddrive with all my other hard drives plugged in. I used the advanced options to partition my empty hard drive and installed Ubuntu on it. It did the rest and grub allows me to boot into all os's I have installed.


0

Gparted in Ubuntu is a good partition management tool. I believe you can use it to delete partitions and then resize/enlarge other partitions. Be very careful though and make sure you've backed up all of your data before you try any of this.


2

Both Windows and Ubuntu provide graphical interfaces to manage partitions. Your question is unclear, so I will answer both potential questions: If you wish to keep both your Ubuntu OS partition and your Windows partition, then from within Ubuntu you may run the "Disks" utility. Type "Disks" into the search field of the Ubuntu menu. First select the disk, ...


0

Since Lubuntu appears to have been installed to the secondary drive successfully, you could try running Boot-Repair to (nearly) automatically fix problems with it not booting right. It's help.Ubuntu.com help/wiki page is here: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair and it should be able to do: Boot-Repair is a simple tool to repair frequent ...


0

The fact that Lubuntu isn't visible from Windows is normal. Lubuntu uses EXT4 by default, which Windows can not or refuses to read. (Although there are EXT drivers like Ext2FSD). If you don't need to access the Lubuntu partition, leave it. Since you installed Lubuntu on a completely different drive, you also have to tell your BIOS to boot from this drive. ...


1

The best is just to install clean Ubuntu by choosing "Erase everything and install Ubuntu" in the installation process. It will create all the required partitions and do everything for you. But anyway, if you want to create the partitions manually just check this out (Fully explained with photos): How to use manual partitioning during installation? Or ...


0

Depending on what you mean with "Is there a way to backup an individual partition that is part of a logical volume?" there are a few possible answers: Can I continue using my current back-up software to back-up? Yes, you can, it's just another partition.. Can I clone the partition easily for redeployment somewhere else? Yes, you can if you set up the LVMs ...


0

thanks everyone ! I did use Fabby's suggestion and ran chkdsk and there were errors that windows corrected, but it did not solve the issue I had. I've decided that it could be that the pen drive itself is the source of the problem so I replaced it with another pen drive and repeated the steps (formatting to FAT32, installing a bootable live Ubuntu with ...


0

What you are trying to do is to shrink the running system partition of Ubuntu. That is like to ask a surgeon to give himself a double bypass... ;-) Boot the Ubuntu Live CD or the gparted live CD and then repartition!


0

As no one seems to be answering anything, I'll chuck in: No experience with LVM under Ubuntu, but experience on other OSes... I would use Clonezilla to clone and I would clone partitions, not the entire system, using partition-to-image. Why? Full system clone will clone the GPT or MBR as well and restoring that on top of the LVM system will surely break ...


0

Obviously some sort of error occurred. I've seen something similar a couple of times. Often what works best for me is to boot the computer to a live cd and use gparted from that cd to pretend to try to slightly resize any partition. It seems the action causes gparted to check and adjust its partitions so everything is corrected.


-1

If you are installing Ubuntu desktop, it will sense the windows partition, then ask you if you want to keep the windows partition, and install Ubuntu alongside, or delete the windows partition, and use the whole disk for Ubuntu. After answering this question, you should be able to use the default disk partition it provides, and not go into the partition menu ...


1

There are a number of issues which are probably going to make this difficult for you: Traditionally, partitioning software liked to align partitions to logical tracks, so if you have 63 sectors per track, this meant aligning partitions to multiples of 63 sectors. In practice this is a small amount of data much smaller than a megabyte. However, hard ...


0

The partition really should be deleted if you deleted in GParted. But there's still a GRUB entry, which starts the Windows boot loader, which can't find Windows any more. UEFI: UEFI should be starting GRUB in order to boot Ubuntu. If it doesn so, remove every "windowsy" thing from the EFI partition. The EFI partition is mounted at /boot/efi. Look for a ...



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