New answers tagged

0

First of all : You have to install Ubuntu in the same mode as Windows is installed. When you have installed Windows in EFI mode, then do this with Ubuntu as well. Second : When there is no boot menu to be seen, disable GRUB hidden timeout. Open a terminal and execute: sudo apt-get install gksu gksudo gedit /etc/default/grub Place a # in ...


0

Grab a copy of the Ubuntu bootable iso, then burn it on to a disc. Check and see if the UEFI is on by restarting your computer and heading to the bios settings. Depending on your computer entering the bios settings can vary on the function keys (mine is F10). You have 2 options on installing: Install Ubuntu in UEFI mode to run alongside Windows in UEFI. ...


1

I am not knowledgeable enough to answer weather GRUB is required or not, but if your goal is to hide GRUB completely , I have a better solution than the accepted answer. In order to achieve the fastest possible boot, instead of having GRUB wait for a timeout, it is possible for GRUB to not print the menu, unless the Shift key is held down during GRUB's ...


0

How many windows partitions do you have? Many OEM (retail bought) machines will limit the number of partitions a drive can have. The only time I've experienced this it's been limited to 4 partitions, but your mileage may vary.


2

Change the boot order in your BIOS so that you can boot using your Windows Recovery Driver and then when installing Windows 10(from the recovery media) - just install it on the entire hard drive. If needed, clean the mbr using BootRec.exe /fixmbr in command prompt.


0

List the successfully installed kernels (excluding booted kernel) by command: dpkg-query -W -f='${Status} ${Package}\n' | awk '/^install ok installed linux-image-[0-9]+/{print $4}' | grep -Fv $(uname -r) Purge the oldest one (say linux-image-4.2.0-23-generic) together with respective "extra" package (that may be installed) and "headers" package by sudo ...


0

Try this sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair For more details, refer this link Please make sure that both Windows and Ubuntu are installed in EFI mode. Also disable secure boot in BIOS.


2

To get rid of the swap partition, use GParted. Boot from the Ubuntu installation media. Select Try Ubuntu without installing. On Live desktop open GParted - delete the swap partition. Grow the Ubuntu partition, just add the unallocated space.


0

Start a live session from a DVD/CD/USB and then: Reduce the swap partition /dev/sdb6 Now you have extra space Expand the ext4 / partition /dev/sdb5


1

Edit: Reading the full e2fsck output, I don't believe that the file system is salvageable. You will need to perform data recovery, format the partition and re-install Ubuntu. From the e2fsck output, it looks like the file system was damaged badly. The super-block is lost but the back-up super-block is still usable. You can try to fix the issue (see later), ...


8

All the other answers start good, advising you that GRUB is usually there whether you see it or not, you probably shouldn't start taking random potshots at it, and how to restore your system to the 'hidden GRUB' you (presumably) previously enjoyed. However, they end up going wrong - in making blanket statements that GRUB is always required, when this is ...


24

You cannot uninstall GRUB. As your installation stands, GRUB is necessary to boot Ubuntu (that's why it's called the bootloader). Every OS has a bootloader, and every OS needs that bootloader to boot (lots of booting :P). EDIT: As people in the comments have pointed out, there are alternatives to using GRUB. However, there is no reason to switch to one, ...


0

Do not try to remove grub, it is used as the bootloader for Ubuntu, just like the Windows mbr, which you just do not see. You could try to install the program grub-customizer, which lets you define different settings for grub in a simple GUI. You could set the timeout to 0 and tell it to always boot the first entry, so you will directly boot Ubuntu without ...


2

The partition you are trying to re-size is mounted and in use (since it's your system partition), and you cannot unmount it when it is active (also since it's your system partition). To fix it: Boot from a USB or CD with a Linux live distribution (Ubuntu for example) Now use Gparted to re-size your partition. GParted is part of the default toolset in ...


0

How to create a Windows boot medium is a topic best addressed on a Windows forum, not here. That said, I'd use FAT, not NTFS, and I'd try using Unetbootin for the job, or copy files manually from the UDF side of the .iso image file. (Most Linux tools will mount the ISO-9660 side, which in the case of a Windows disc, contains a text file with a message to the ...


0

Here is how I just made a perfect and clean installation of support for the exFAT file system type, to access my new micro SD card, in my Ubuntu 12.04 (64-bit, running on a Thinkpad T60, dual core, 2.0GHz and 4Gb ram, running on an internal Kingston SSD drive). All one need do is install Synaptic Package Manager, possibly by using the default package ...


1

Macs normally come with EFI System Partitions (ESPs) of about 100 MiB, which is plenty big enough for most purposes. (I recommend making them bigger for reasons related to EFI driver bugs, but that's not an issue here.) If you're seeing just ~6 MiB of free space on your ESP (with a mount point of /boot/efi), then something is wrong. I recommend you discover ...


0

I got some success in this but not 100% success that I was looking for. I wanted to move out /home 11G /opt 9G /usr 7G /var 3G /tmp 1.1G to my second hard drive(around 840 GB for Ubuntu and remaining 2.1 TB for Windows 10) so that my Ubuntu can grow in future without any issues. Never used LVM in the past so learnt from these sources: source1 source2 ...


0

You ask Ubuntu Linux like this: swapon -s Then it displays (for me): Filename Type Size Used Priority /dev/sda1 partition 8388604 14056 -1 Here you can see where howmuch usage priority. Do try the help with commands: command --help swapon --help In linux just an H might mean Human readable or something else, or ...


0

there's a very good possibility that your flash drive is dead. Any working flash drives would allow you to delete/recreate/alter the partition table. If this isn't happening any more, the hardware on your flash drive is gone, gone for ever...


0

Saddly, I've read a tutorial on how to fix this issues on some other page, and the tutorial messed my partition, which deleted all my information :(. So, now that the damage was done, I've "fixed" my hard drive formatting it again and creating the partitions from scratch. Thanks for your help :)


0

Try to change grub.cfg for Windows 7. Boot your system to the GRUB menu. Select (highlight) the GRUB boot menu entry Windows 7 (loader) (on /dev/sda3) Press e to edit the GRUB boot commands for Windows 7. Your current boot command should look like: insmod part_msdos insmod ntfs set root='hd0,msdos3' if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then ...


0

I will recommend doing boot-repair sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair You can get more information from here: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair "Active operating system was windows 7, with pre-installed windows 8 on it (but not activated)." What ...


1

There's nothing special about Virtualbox, it will work just like any other software would. As usual with encryption, there may be a performance hit.


2

Okay. I fixed it. I'll explain for anyone that might ever come across this. On the GParted screenshot you see /dev/sdb/ extended has a key/lock infront of it. When I clicked info it said the following: Status: Busy (At least one logical partition is mounted) Alright. It was because I was booted into my Ubuntu. I burned GParted on a Live CD and booted that. ...


0

Do you have the recovery disk(USB) for Windows 10? I will suggest do a fresh install of both the O/S. First recover the system and install(recover) Windows 10. Then create partitions for Ubuntu from Windows only(using disk management tool). Make sure secure boot is completed disabled in BIOS. If windows 10 is installed in EFI mode, make sure that Ubutnu is ...


0

To access files on Windows, you can mount your Windows partition with read-only privilege. eg. sudo mkdir /media/windows sudo mount -t ntfs-3g -o ro /dev/sda3 /media/windows This works for me on my Windows 10 & Ubuntu 15.10 dual booting system. To enter into Windows 10, you should check your boot sequences in bios settings by selecting Windows UEFI ...


0

do sudo fdisk -l edit your question to include the output :)


1

You Can always try using fdisk Open a terminal (Ctl+ALt+t) and type sudo fdisk /dev/sdy where /dev/sdy = The device file for your flash drive. Once you get fdisk open, type p to list the partition table, Once you know where it is located you can use d # to delete it. (# = The partition; ExAMPLE d 1, d 2) w writes the partition table back to the disk and ...


1

Launch the Disks program from the launcher. The "Volumes" section will show you all the disks in your system. Select your 3Tb HDD. In the bar at the bottom of the Volumes diagram, click the gear wheels icon to bring up the settings for that disk. Click on Edit Mount Options Turn on the Auto Mount option, and make sure the 'show in user interface' ...


0

Sometimes, this behavior arises when windows is not properly shutdown or you might have windows hibernated. In this case if you boot ubuntu it will not mount that drive. Hope this helps.


2

You have a (corrupted) Windows NTFS partition. By being closed source, Microsoft Windows makes it difficult to impossible for Linux to repair its secret disk structure. Like the error message says In the first case run chkdsk /f on Windows then reboot into Windows twice. Windows MIGHT be able to fix the disk. Ask how to boot Windows from some alternate ...


0

for sure that is not a problem of available space. Seems that for some reason your installation image is not correct. The message on the bottom says, that installer cannot find /dev/sdc device containing installation image. You mentioned about 2 SDDs in RAID mode. My guess is following: hardware RAID under windows is recognized as single drive (which is ...


0

Usuing 14.04LTS, I had the same problem as tomasb, that encrypted swap wasn't on after reboot. I discovered that /etc/crypttab wasn't being processed because the necessary init.d scripts (cryptdisks and cryptdisks-early) weren't installed. I solved that problem with $ sudo apt-get install cryptsetup Rebooted and I had encrypted swap.


2

In GParted: Right click on sda3, choose Resize/Move and slide it completely to the right. Right click on sda1, choose Resize/Move and resize it fitting the unallocated space.


2

The problem in your case is that, in the image shown above your 289.09GB HDD is of MBR (Master Boot record)partition style which only supports up to 4 primary partitions (i.e blue partitions) . If you want more than 4 partitions then you have to create an extended partition such that the total HDD has 3 primary and 1 extended partition. Then from that ...


2

I had the same trouble with an NVMe disk. That technology is quite recent and the old version of GParted in Ubuntu repo couldn't see my SSD. I resolved creating a GParted live USB with the latest version of the software.


2

I would use gnome-disk-utility formating the drive, not the partition. Next, (if it is the case) in Windows format in NTFS using Disk Managment. For the (so many) folder/files copying, grsync is a better choice than simple copy-paste. Pay attention at the Source and Destination "?" pop-up! Do a sync simulation first


1

There are many factors which can influence drive performance. Transferring 12000 files of any size will not be a quick process, and 3 MB/s is a conceivable transfer rate for such a task. It sounds like your hard drive may also be suffering the effects of age. Full formats also are very time intensive, so the quick format option is nearly always your best ...


0

Ok, it looks I found the solution. I have to tell mdadm to use external metadata, as detailed here


1

It depends on how you boot the installer. If you boot it in EFI/UEFI mode, it should go on the EFI System Partition (ESP). If you boot it in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode, it will probably go to the MBR of /dev/sda, but might conceivably go to the MBR of /dev/sdb. Either way, that's probably not what you want.... Backing up, in a dual-boot scenario, it's important ...


0

I tried repairing with boot rescue, but closed in the middle-way because I did not quite understand what it was trying to do. That I guess further worsened the grub and chances of booting into Ubuntu. After further consulting our system admin, I came to know that the partition disks have been converted to dynamic disks by microsoft windows. And once ...


0

For your case on the 260MB efi system partition that's alongside the windows bootloader.


4

You cannot do this from within a running system. You have to do the partitioning from a live media. Boot from Ubuntu (DVD/USB) installation media. Select Try Ubuntu without installing. On the Live desktop open GParted ...


1

You have a lot of space in /dev/sda2 which is of type ntfs. I will say either create a new partition while installing Ubuntu or go back to Windows. Under Disk management - create some space for Ububtu. To be very simple you just need around 10 GB+ kind of space for Ubuntu...Ubuntu installer can then create / and swap partition for you automatically and then ...


2

Boot back into Windows and use the Disk Management tool (search for "partition" in the start menu) to "shrink" one of the discs. That will create the free space that you can use to install Ubuntu. I always use the Windows tools to resize discs on a windows machine. It helps reduce the possibility of data loss. howtogeek.com has a nice tutorial on how to ...


0

It's easy to solve, but you need some tools before you can do it: A Linux system with GRUB. A Live media should do it; A spare USB drive (backup the data from it). First, boot into the Linux system (it must have GRUB installed!). Use a tool such as GParted to format your USB drive as ext2. It must be ext2*! When using GParted you should get your USB ...


0

Try: Use the f12 for boot order or another key. (Should be that key for acer) Also try another USB installer. Universal usb installer is good. Using a pre-installed ubuntu to make a startup disk is also good. Click on "format disk" to format it even if the disk is clean. This makes a bootable disk. Sometimes a pop up windown comes up when installing ...


0

There are a couple reasons this could be happening. First, be sure to format your USB completely, I recommend using Rufus to create the flash drive as it formats it as well as makes the bootable USB for you. Secondly, be sure that you give plenty of time for the loading screen to work. Depending on your hardware it could take up to an hour ...


2

I would rather choose the manual partitioning, then choose the Ubuntu hard disk. The bootloader will be installed on the disk where you decide to install Ubuntu, which should be the 1st boot device in the bios (or uefi). Grub will let you choose between linux and windows. As David pointed out, please have a look at How to use manual partitioning during ...



Top 50 recent answers are included