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If you have successfully dual booted Windows UEFI with Ubuntu 14.04 in the past, you can use exact same steps to dual boot Windows UEFI and Ubuntu 15.04. There is no difference here.


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From my experience, it is not too different. Just make sure to use the Disk Management on Windows to resize your Windows partition; gparted doesn't like to work well with Windows partitions.


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Download the latest stable Clonezilla version (iso) : http://sourceforge.net/projects/clonezilla/files/clonezilla_live_stable/ Create a bootable media (CD/USB) from the iso file. Boot from this former created Clonezilla live media. Create a backup from your HDD ubuntu partition(s). Restore the backup to your SSD. Boot from ubuntu install ...


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GRUB is designed to take over control of the initial stages of the boot process. This works fine on a single-boot system (Ubuntu only, say) or when dual-booting one GRUB-based OS (like Ubuntu) with Windows; but when you install two GRUB-based OSes (like Ubuntu and Mint), the two GRUBs will fight for control of the boot process. Experienced multi-booters ...


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What I would do: 1.) Install Windows (it creates it's own bootloader partition - leave this one as is) 2.) In windows shrink the drive/partition -- to make space for your Ubuntu 3.) Run Ubuntu install @ Partioner do the following: Leave the Windows partitions as is (there should be 2 - the Boot and the one you shrank) 4.) Leave all folders in one ...


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Using the kernel that comes from LTS (3.19). Noticed that having persistent on the command line and NO caspar-rw FILE will stop the boot process in busybox. Adding the casper-rw file removes that problem. My work-around for now is use a small casper-rw file AND and home-rw partition which cover the remainder of the thumb drive.


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2.5GB is enough, you can see this when you boot from an actual live CD (which can't be increased in size) which can be used at a minimum of 2.5 GB for a DVD and 2GB for a 'CD' so you can go with a minimum of 2.5GB just to be on the safe side.


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If you have multiple installs using grub2, only one of them can be in MBR and controls booting. That usually is the last install. And you may have issues if you installed both originally to MBR of same drive. Grub remembers where it installed and a major update of grub will reinstall it. Or either or both installs may be updating grub. I like to document how ...


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Select try ubuntu before you install Open gparted Delete every partition on your hard drive, then click apply changes. Restart your computer, you will now be able to create partitions


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The first two answers are incredibly bad advice. Formatting or re-writing the partition table, as suggested in the first 2 answers, does NOT delete the data and the data can be recovered in about 20 minutes. This is because deleting and recreating partition table does not delete data at all. You can recover data even after quick format of partition. It is ...


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Followed the advise of olfred: See the comments above.


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This is how it's supposed to be. As a normal user you are only interested and have access to your home folder, which is under /home Open a terminal and type ls -l /home (that's a lowercase L, not a numerical one) and you'll see that there is a directory named after your username and its ownership is set to you. This is where you put your work.


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I really do appreciate your answer, but it did not work in my case. But, I did try another separate usb. Used Unetbootin to make Ubuntu 14.04.3LTS Live USB. Booted with live USB. Once booted I used gparted to delete and format all partitions. I formatted my msata to a ext3 partition instead of ext4. Mounted the msata as / and I formatted my hdd as /home as ...


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I already solved my issue. I don't know if is the easier way to do this, but it worked for me. I put another third drive on the machine, create a lvm group, lvm volumes and copy with dd the intire logical volume to this disk. After that I removed the 3 lvms that was in the end of the disk and resized the extents partition, after the resize I recreated the ...


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Had the same problem and tried this. When computer comes on, go to the option which usually works for me it was the first on the grub menu(Ubuntu 14.04) and press 'e'. This takes you to a shell script, use the up, down, left and right keys to navigate. Remove the line beginning with the if statement right up to the fi (the end of the if statement). To ...


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This is the VirtualBox file and not your real drive, it won't format your real Linux.


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How does your system boot? Via EFI or MBR (CSM)? If the former, I can't see why you couldn't use my guide, but create a RAID10 instead of RAID1 in steps 2+more. For maximum redundancy, I would clone the EFI boot partition to all four drives.


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You have already given the answer from the beginning. Does the following creates another partition in Linux 300 GB NTFS type - FAT32 and then try to reinstall Windows, I believe we will have no problem.


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Você já deu a resposta desde o início. Faz o seguinte cria outra partição no Linux de 300 GB do tipo NTFS - FAT32 e então tenta novamente instalar o Windows, acredito que não terá problema nenhum.


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Few days ago I tried to install Windows 10 using USB stick, but couldn't because Ubuntu didn't boot it. So, that's a misconception here. Ubuntu won't boot from your USB stick. That has to happen before you boot Ubuntu or any other operating system. First off, not all computers can boot from USB, they need to be sufficiently new to support this (the ...


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Find your current running kernel with: uname -r Then delete any vmlinuz/initrd kernel & image files from boot provided they are not the running kernel. I suggest you create a copy of the running kernel somewhere first just in case you make a mistake. You can remove old kernels several ways. Just deleting them (not recommended). Use a tool: How do ...


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Open the Windows Disk Management console using start -> run -> diskmgmt.msc Find the right partition, right mouse click and mount it from there.


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#!/bin/bash adb shell "su dd if=/dev/block/mmcblk0 | /dev/examiner/nc -l -p 8888" The problem is that this way the pipe is executed in the unprivileged adb shell, and not in the root shell spawned by su; this leads to the pipe being executed without root privileges and to the 0-lenght file (probably due to the if command failing to read a block device ...


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btw the simplest thing to do is wipe your phone , set your partitions as you want em ( there's a ton of app with android ) , then install ubuntu touch in your pre-set partition .... i mean that's what i would do...


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[Removed raid explanation] If you wanted to use it in the LVM, you don't need the raid, you can add the harddrives (or rather partitions on the hard drive) directly into the LVM and add that to the pool. (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Lvm) Here are a few more step by step instructions, that I cannot test ATM. Your comment implies to me that you are afraid of ...


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With the command mount -o loop rootfs.ext3 /media/fuse/ you have already mounted a loop device via the file rootfs.ext3, that contains a file system image. The file system is mounted in /media/fuse.


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It's not really an direct answer for your problem, but if your goal is to have the system run even when one drive fails, a raid 5 would do just that and give you more disk space.


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A modern solution would have been to format both partitions in BTRFS, may be link them all in multi-disk setup and use virtual partitions over it. It would have allowed you to utilize all free space without worries where folder is kept or create extra robustness by duplicating data + a load of cool features.


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Most setups don't need that much space on /. You could use a filesystem that can use more than one partition or you could use LVM to make a 180gb /home and a ~64gb /. Honestly though, I think thats overkill for a simple private system. I always use symlinks in these situations: When your /home reaches 75% find a bigger directory that won't change size that ...


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Hi you could try this see link: Booting into windows Booting problems Reinstalling grub and it might work fine this three ways.


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I use Gparted and boot-repair on a live USB (in many system rescue iso). Boot with this live USB. Mount your external drive and your internal drive. With Gparted : Free space for the new primary partition (non logical) on your internal drive. (size > size of the partition on the external drive). Copy-paste the ext4 linux partition of your external drive on ...


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this is happening because the volume you gotta shrink or expand is the one u are using ( is mounted ) you better use a Live distro in order to do so....sysresccd ( http://www.sysresccd.org/) basically make a live usb of that distro ....and u will be able to modify your partition ....keep in mind that u can't edit mounted partitions and u can't un-mount ...


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it's very simple dude use the utility already shipped with ubuntu called " Disks" Disks can dinamically change partitions size , but if the volume you gotta shrink or expand is the one u are using ( is mounted ) you better use a Live distro in order to do so....sysresccd ( http://www.sysresccd.org/)


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try to use "gparted" which can be installed in ubuntu or can be run from USB disk or live UBUNTU cd.


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You are not doing anything wrong. This behavior in fdisk and gparted is expected since you formatted the entire raw device as a LUKS volume, so there is no partition table on the device. The partition table normally resides at the beginning of the device (and also the end of the device for GPT), but it is not strictly necessary if the whole device will be ...


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I have the same issue, Installer hangs when selecting full disk encryption. Has this solution worked for you: When the installer boots up, select "Try Ubuntu". After the desktop loads, open a terminal and run: sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda Then start the installation normally. Trying to understand the best way to resovle this ...


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It is not grub that is missing, but your Linux partition. /dev/sda2 208,894 416,761,855 416,552,962 5 Extended /dev/sda5 400,158,720 416,761,855 16,603,136 82 Linux swap / Solaris You have a missing partition one or two sectors after the start of the extended and a few sectors before the start of sda5 swap. It probalby ...


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If you have 8GB mem and run a 64-bit system, have a look at zfs: zfs on linux FAQ, nice presentation.


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If you only have 128GB out of 450GB used on sda3, you can definitely downsize the partition to install OpenSUSE. Open Gparted in Ubuntu and use it to make sda3 a little smaller. Then select Apply. Make sure not to format it or resize the wrong partition.


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It seems the installer has overwritten your bootloader. Boot from the Windows 8 installer, and the first window will contain a "Repair your computer" label. Then select "Advanced options" and "Command Prompt" Run commands "bootrec.exe /FixBoot" and "bootrec.exe /FixMbr" to fix the bootloader If it says "Element not found" then Windows partition isn't ...


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You can not just extend any partition you like. There must be some space at least at one side of the partition. If that is not the case, you need to move other partitions to get this space in the right place. Important note: If you move the left side of linux or Windows boot partition, the system will not boot. You will need to re-install grub.


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You cannot merge two partitions. You can only delete those partitions and combine them. So here is my opinion: Backup your important data Boot from Live DVD. Delete both the ext4 partitions and reinstall Ubuntu 15.04 You want to keep your files without deleting them, but that is not possible. You are rewriting the partitions. So expectedly, the files ...


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Likely the filesytem your external drive came with did not store additional file system details or recovery partition tables to ease recovery. Therefore, once the partition table, or the file allocation tables where overwritten by zeros I see little to no chance to recover these. Therefore you are faced with the cumbersome task to manually rename files ...


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Using Defraggler to defragment will allow you to move the files Windows places at the end of its disk space to make all files contiguous at the beginning. After using Defraggler, you will then be able to make the Windows partition much smaller. https://www.piriform.com/defraggler/download I have done this before, and it worked.


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To retrieve your 8.1 license key install windows 8.1 from any copy that is "untouched" you can use any license key you have at your disposal, then go to "rweverything.com" download the 64/32 bit "read/write portable utility" and run it, click on "ACPI" button and then in the "ACPI Table" pop up click on the "MSDM tab", at the bottom you should see the ...


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There is many ways to do it. This are the best two ways. 1- If you want to show the ext partition in my computer use "Ext2Fsd" for download Click here You can have Ext2Fsd launch at every boot or only open it when you need it. While you can theoretically enable support for writing to Linux partitions, I haven’t tested this. I’d be worried about this ...


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resize2fs /dev/mapper/x Next time you could rather use the lvm-extend: lvm-extend -r /dev/mapper/x


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You will need to use swapoff and swapon to fix the problem, because you need to reformat the swap to the full size of the partition, and you cannot do this while it is in use. First type: sudo swaplabel /dev/sdb2 You should see something like: UUID: ad49d796-e9d9-4bde-8d28-a920c3727d48 If so, now type the following VERY carefully, where <UUID> ...


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There is a work around though for using a RAID as your root device, it just involves a little planning. You start by using LVM to install to a single disk. Then when the operating system is up, you create a degraded RAID1 with the other disk. https://www.zmonkey.org/blog/content/create-degraded-raid1-array Now, reboot and use a live usb stick so you can ...


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There is a line which indicates a possible problem of the partition containing Linux: Mounting failed: mount: unknown filesystem type '' You can try to mount it manaully and then reinstall GRUB. If /dev/sda5 really is your Linux root partition (or if you had a /boot partition use that instead), from the live medium, open a Terminal and try the ...



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