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It sounds like you missed the step to format the drive when installing. However Takkat is correct that with the dump provided it shows only a 320gb disk with 3 partitions on it. When you boot up do you have the option to choose ubuntu or windows 7?


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boot your computer on a Ubuntu live-CD or live-USB then follow the section "2nd option : install Boot-Repair in Ubuntu" from this link https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair


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Inside EC2, to me, it only really makes sense to use the entire volume for the filesystem, because of the flexibility allowed by Elastic Block Store (EBS) volumes, which are much different than many physical disks, in the sense that you can provision them as needed, destroy them as needed, attach and detach them from instances without rebooting, and take ...


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b). /dev/sda3 is the partition that you mount, /media/data/ is the place in the directory tree where the files on the partition are found. The mount command links the partition (or drive) to the directory tree. You can talk about the amount of space on /dev/sda3, or whether it is full or not, but you don't access files and directories through /dev/sda3/.


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Download Gparted and burn it on a CD. (http://gparted.org/livecd.php ). This is a boot able CD. Shutdown and boot with the Gparted CD. At this moment there is no operation system running so you can make your partitions.


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You cannot create partition for any drive won which operating system is running. The only way to create partition on the system drive is by running ubuntu through a live cd. You may use lili to create a pendrive and using that you can run ubuntu from pen drive, and create partition of the system drive using gparted.


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Had problems with gparted running from the OS (ie not started from a "live" boot disk). Assuming you want to assign the whole drive to one ext4 partition. Note: assuming to make a whole disk ext4 will destroy any existing data on that drive! Try the manual method, do lsblk to visually determine where you USB drive is, ie the letter X in /dev/sdX, ...


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I've just done exactly this: Installed Win10 (or 8, or 7) on 1/3 of my laptops SSD Installed Ubuntu on 1/3 of the laptops SSD Allocated the remaining 1/3 as a shared disk for data I want in both operating systems. This partition has to be allocated in NTFS (do it in Windows just to make sure). Ubuntu can load NTFS partitions without issue, including the ...


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What I would do is to try and format the HDD launching Ubuntu from a live CD/USB and run Gparted (should be, but if not available in the live environment just install it sudo apt-get install gparted): Once it is there make sure the disk is not mounted (otherwise can't format it) and select the hdd Toggle Device/Create partition table and create a new ...


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How about just shrink sda4 (I think windows can shrink itself, in case you're worried about windows' proprietary NTFS filesystem & linux's ntfs drivers) and then create a new separate partition in the new empty space, for your /home folder, &/or for data? A default Ubuntu installation only takes up under 8GB of space (I think, the installer won't ...


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You can shrink sda4 (e.g. by 10GB) and then just move sda5 and sda6 to the left by the same amount. After that, you have space to enlarge sda7. But caution: Partitioning is always risky! Especially moving the left border of a partition, especially of a bootable system partition, can cause errors that might prevent your machine from booting! A backup is the ...


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Running VBoxManage modifyhd YOUR_HARD_DISK.vdi --resize SIZE_IN_MB as mentioned here How do I increase the hard disk size of the virtual machine? is the first step. The partition then has to be resized. Doing this wasn't very straightforward and the best instructions that I could find and that worked are here: ...


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If your Win7 is running normal then use Windows disk management and unallocate your desired free space for Ubuntu 50GB for ext4 journal and same size of your RAM for swap. Install Ubuntu via USB disk and a select the option that states Other...(something in that sense...). Then select your unallocated free space to create ext4 and swap. If your Win7 is gone ...


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It sounds like you didn't preserve the correct ownerships/permissions when you copied the files. You can check the most important file attributes by logging in to the TTY and using ls -ld $HOME/{,.ICEauthority,.Xauthority} If necessary, you can change the ownership back recursively using sudo chown -R $USER:$USER $HOME If you continue to experience ...


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As said in the comments you should always backup your system before updating , creating. Separate home will not help that, you should use an external hard drive or a completely separate internal hard drive, not just a partitioned one. Hope this helps!


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Yes, you can do it this way. For example (when you have sda with parition sda2 which is PV in VG space: create new raid with missing device and add it to vg mdadm --create /dev/md1 --level raid1 --raid-devices=2 /dev/sdb2 missing pcreate /dev/md1 vgextend space /dev/md1 move existing volume to md1: pvmove -v /dev/sda2 /dev/md1 when it finish, reduce VG ...


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I have already written about data recovery here: Recovering Very Important Lost Data From Ntfs Partition Have a look here as well http://help.ubuntu.com/community/DataRecovery and here http://forensicswiki.org/wiki/Tools:Data_Recovery First of all, if you lost an important file, stop using the file system the file was on NOW. The data you lost might still ...


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Short answer: What Timur Fayzrakhmanov wrote is right, replace the /boot-partition with an EFI partition. What I know or found out: For booting UEFI you need a FAT32 EFI partition, one for each drive is sufficient and can handle several operating systems (this depends mostly on your UEFI firmware). For booting Linux in legacy mode on a GPT drive you ...


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@Onty2012 I am sorry to inform you that your data is most likely corrupted. May I suggest looking for computer shops in the area see if they can recover any of your data. Hope this help


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What you're showing is the windows disk manager which doesn't recognize EXT3/EXT4 partitions. If you did install Ubuntu (and it looks like it from your screenshot), just reboot from your hard disk and you should see a menu showing you how to boot into Windows or how to boot into Ubuntu. If you don't see such a menu, boot from the USB again, press ...


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$HOME is your home-directory, by default /home/[your username]. It is usually available as an environmental-variable. Open a shell and enter echo $HOME and you will see it's absolute path. However, I would not recommend fiddling around there as not all programs use those variables. I'd just create symlinks to the folders in your shared partition, ie: ...


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To install Ubuntu on GPT drive and UEFI there is must be "EFI boot partition". The other partitions like "/home", "/boot" are optional. For me optimal are the following partitioning: EFI boot partition swap / (root) /home and that's all)


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I determined that the best thing for me to do, in my circumstance, was to purchase a new HDD large enough for what I needed. It ends up being more cost effective than a temporary cloud solution or purchasing a BD-R drive and media, and worth avoiding the frustration of USB thumb sticks and DVD-Rs, plus I can get more utility out of it later.


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Are you actually using Windows cmd to try & run linux commands? And Windows disk management to see what's going on? That's not (ever) going to work - Windows is deliberately blind to other OS's, to discourage you from tinkering, and does not have the tools to do this. So the answer to your question is perhaps that there's nothing wrong at all... If you ...


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It's extremely likely that nothing is wrong with the partition that you created with gparted. What's wrong is expecting Windows to recognize native file systems of Non-Microsoft operating systems. Boot the system, choose Ubuntu from the GRUB menu and you'll find that Ubuntu happily recognizes all your file systems (including Microsoft’s). If you have ...


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You can't resize or otherwise edit a mounted partition, and if you're working from inside Ubuntu (rather than, say, from a Live CD or USB), the partition Ubuntu is installed to is mounted. Reboot from a Live medium, and you'll be able to do all the resizing and repartitioning you need. Be careful, you already know why you should back up first!


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Use df -H instead. The difference you see is because of the difference in real GBs/TBs (factor of 1024) and sales men's GBs/TBs (factor of 1000).


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I just went for it and there weren't any problems. In my GRUB menu it still has "Windows 7" as the option, but it boots to Windows 10 Tech Preview.


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The utility that you want to use is fdisk however you should use it with sudo in orded to have permission to do such administrative task. You can use sudo fdisk -l or even more specific sudo fdisk - l dev/sda to take a look on the current state of your hdd( size, partitions,free space,etc). Now for creating a new parttion.Use sudo fdisk dev/sda(assuming ...


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This is the main rule to install ubuntu from uefi Kill UEFI, On Legacy BIOS. Kill Secure Boot. Make partition /boot at least 200 MB inside Ubiquity. Format that partition with option EFI BOOT, not EXT or another format. make root partition / . if it'snot clear try to googling or something.


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I have done this from an application in the Windows 7. It should be in win 8 also. We can shrink the size. Afterwards "Ubuntu"can be installed with C.D. This C.D can be created by down-loading an Image file(nrg)and running a virtual drive/burning Disc. 'How to create a virtual drive' may be known from Internet.But we should be careful not to lose Windows ...


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First, it looks like you're trying to create a partition table, on a partition /dev/sdb1 instead of on the disk itself /dev/sdb I'm guessing that could lead to some strange errors... are you really trying to create 64 partitions on a USB drive, or that could be a strange error. After sorting out the partition table, I think these commands should work: ...


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Make a full system backup! Read this Q&A for more information: you're user type 4. Make a full data backup as well. Follow the official Ubuntu Installation instructions until you're at step 4. Choose something else Delete the 13.10 partition Create a new partition Continue the official Ubuntu Installation instructions at step 5


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Just press the "close" button!


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From Reddit: When I installed it, it didn't overwrite my Ubuntu partition but it destroyed the GRUB bootloader and made Ubuntu unusable. You may want to use a diffrent hard drive just to be safe. Windows tends to like overwriting the MBR. If it does, to fix it just grab a boot-repair image. That'll rewrite your MBR so it invokes Grub again. ...


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Whatever you have described seems like a lot of work to do. I would prefer formatting the hard drive and starting everything afresh. This seems like less haste. However, follow the steps below to get what you want. Remember to create a backup of all your data before starting. Install whichever partition tool that you prefer. Re size one of your partitions ...


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Update: I've received my replacement SSD but was still experiencing the same issues. It turned out that in my BIOS (gigabyte fx990 ud3 rev 4.0) OnChip SATA Port4/5 Type was set to IDE instead of as SATA type. Only the Samsung 840 EVO had the problem being run as IDE.


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By far the best way to dual boot (or triple or quadruple boot) a computer is to follow this sequence: (1) download and burn to CD a standalone version of gparted. (2) Use that to partition your disk as desired, say 75 GB for Windows, 75 GB for Linux, 75 GB for another version of Linux, and 75 GB for pure data to be read/written by both Win 7 and Linux. ...


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Yes, you can use gparted or disk utility to make partitions of your disk. Another, partition on ubuntu is the same way to backup your dato like D: E: f: drives of windows.


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WUBI doesn't work with Windows 8, and s not recommended anymore (what version of Ubuntu did you install with it anyway? I don't think it's available in the current versions), so don't use that, especially if you want to erase all other OS's (like windows) and leave only Ubuntu. Here's the Ubuntu.com "Download Ubuntu Desktop" page, that has some guides on ...


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Yes, it is possible to change partitions. You should use Gparted software for this purpose. No, it is not necessary to make partitions, as system installer has already made them for you. See the links:http://www.howtogeek.com/114503/how-to-resize-your-ubuntu-partitions/ https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HowtoPartition


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We can't see the disk in ubuntu at any version because all disk is has allocated ubuntu. If we want to see whole disk space then go to system setting and its show all configuration of computer as well.


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I went into /etc/default/grub and uncommented the line GRUB_TERMINAL=console and it worked. That is, on bootup I got and old-school list of possible boot options, and I was able to choose my old partition (sda1). It booted into that partition without any error, so far. So it appears that for whatever reason, my configuration did not like the graphical ...


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It sounds as though the new drive doesn't have the correct partitioning - if you're only seeing one. Did you pass the dd command '/dev/sdn' or '/dev'sdn1' to write to?I think your first task now is to remove the new drive, and see if you need to undo the MBR 'fix' - if so, there are several questions about that here with answers such as this. Once you have ...


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In ubuntu you can not install programs on other partition but in windows you can if you want a common partition to access fies from windows and ubuntu make one partition on your HDD as NTFS using windows or gparted in ubuntu,this partition would be accessible from both the OS.FAT32 partition can only support 32GB of disk space if you want a larger common ...


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The installer will use GPT automatically for disks over 2 TiB. As long as you choose one of the automatic options everything will work automatically. If you wish to choose the manual partitioning option, you just need to make sure to create a 1 MiB bios_grub partition if your machine is bios booting instead of uefi.


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The native file system for Linux (Ubuntu) is ext4, which Windows does not support. Ubuntu can read and write to NTFS but with some limitations. So, what effectively happens is that Ubuntu can read Windows files but Windows cannot read Ubuntu files. So, the best thing I think, would be to have a separate FAT32 partition to share files between both OSes. ...


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I think you got it all. An ssd with 240gb wouldn't hurt for dual boot. The additional 1tb HDD is a must have. Install all your software there. However I recommend resize the 1tb HDD to 50% and create a Linux partition from Ubuntu on the empty part. Like: WinPrograms and LinuxPrograms.


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There is no 100% satisfactory solution to your problem right now, only workarounds. and the one resource that is going to help you now is testdisk. Furthermore, there is really only one thing I can advise you now: stop writing to the disk, preferably take a clone and work from the clone. Why? Well if someone comes up with a better idea then testdisk, you ...


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KEEP AWAY FROM SDA1 (FAT32)!!! This is where your EFI boot loader is installed. You will have trouble after wiping it! Usually the default installation option should give you a "/" partition and a "swap" partition (on UEFI systems also that additional boot partition). According to this, I assume, that this "unknown" partition /dev/sda3 used to be your swap, ...



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