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You can remove all partitions if you like. But you will lose the recpvery feature that allows to restore everything to factory defaults. /dev/sda1 is EFI boot. It is needed for UEFI. /dev/sda3 must be Ubuntu OEM distribution image. I do not know what /dev/sda2 is for, but it may be also needed for factory restore. Regarding swap partition that you call ...


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ESP-System, DIAGS is for OEM(reserved) (dell of course), and OS is your primary partition. http://en.community.dell.com/support-forums/software-os/f/4677/t/19494111 Check out this forum of official google... Will be helpful for sure...


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I wonder if it is possible to transfer image files from an SD memory card (flash) to a bulk flash drives using just the MBED?


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What you are seeing is a little misleading, because most of those lines aren't real partitions. The line with filesystem udev is a virtual filesystem that does not exist on disk, and just represents some data in memory. Lines with filesystem tmpfs are virtual filesystems that exist only in memory, or swapped to the existing swap partition. They are not ...


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I had the same problem. Finally I used SD Card Formatter (https://www.sdcard.org/downloads/formatter_4/). It have the option to ignore any partitions, doesn't matter the file system format. Good luck!


2

If you don't mind to reinstall, I propose to reinstall instead of dealing with Gparted and all those partitions. Boot into Ubuntu Installation media. This can be either CD or USB stick. Start the installation. Proceed to Step 4 and choose "Something else": You will see your disk as /dev/sda Click "New Partition Table..." You will see that you have free ...


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You can find information on Dual Booting Windows and Ubuntu here: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/WindowsDualBoot It is recommended that you first install Windows and then Ubuntu. Also, Ubuntu gives you an option to create a new partition table, when you install. You can also find detailed installation instruction here: ...


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This is something very simple to set up. I would utilize the boot menu of the motherboard to get things working. If you already have one OS set up, just disconnect the hard drive you don't want to overwrite. Once everything is set with Linux on the SSD and Windows on the HDD, you can add the mount point for the HDD editing /etc/fstab. You will need to ...


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You should under the partition fedora 21 those change under the setup, and choose ext4 and put it as root the symbol / then you should could install Ubuntu combined whit fedora 21, and after this you have to alther the grub to boot mgrwmv.efi, and the type this in at the bottom. menuentry "windows 7" fi --uuid NTFS --set-root=(uuid of ...


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I will try to answer your question. Go to www.ubuntu.com and download the distribution of your choice. Save it to your computer. Now, Burn this download to a DVD. Put the DVD in to cd/dvd slot and restart your computer. You have just created a live dvd. I think what is happening is you cannot partition when you are using the operating system. A live dvd ...


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Have you tryed to boot from USB and enter the terminal, and type this in: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get -y install boot-repair && boot-repair and it might work fine this way. more info at: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair


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If you are not planning on using windows for a long time, but still want to preserve your license, you could make an installation medium for it. This will automatically save your license in modern Windows OS (see this answer for details on how to). Then, you can simply run your ubuntu usb live and install ubuntu from scratch by choosing the option "Erase ...


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First, you must determine your boot modes: BIOS or EFI. Note the plural modes; it's possible to install Windows in one mode and Ubuntu in the other. You can learn each OSes' boot mode from Ubuntu: Check for a directory called /sys/firmware/efi. If it's present, Ubuntu is booted in EFI mode; if it's absent, Ubuntu is booted in BIOS mode. Type sudo parted ...


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Especially if you are moving and/or resizing existing partitions, make sure you backup all important data in case it is lost or damaged. Firstly, if you are running Gparted from a installed Ubuntu, you can't resize the partitions on which it is installed (it can unmount other partitions though), so you need to use a live disk (explained here). Then you can ...


1

You can back up your personal files to an external disk with normal file-copying commands (cp in a Terminal or drag-and-drop with whatever file manager you like). That's normally adequate, unless you do heavy customization of system-wide settings (in /etc). In a worst-case scenario, you'd re-install Ubuntu and then copy your personal files back. Clonezilla ...


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I am not really sure what you mean by "just bootup a portable linux drive". If what you want is: hard-copy your sda2 into a usb and then eventually boot from it, it is probably possible. What you can surely do is: dd your sda2 to a key (be careful with the dd command and see here) If you want to restore: dd it back to an appropriate sized partition Boot ...


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When your computer boots up, enter BIOS and change the boot settings so that the default device is your hard drive and not your USB or CD.


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Remove the installation media (disk or usb) and then reboot.


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Well I didn't get very much input into my problem, but I uncovered a solution and will post it here for posterity. The clue came from this article I needed to add two modules to /etc/initramfs-tools/modules 1) sata_nv which is what makes the SATA controller where the GPT drive connects, work 2) usbhid just in case I get dumped into a busybox shell again. ...


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Since i cannot comment i will do it like this, Take a look at this: I can't get grub menu to show up during boot


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Technically, the answer is "yes." You can use fdisk to partition in-use MBR disks and gdisk to partition in-use GPT disks. GParted will also let you alter any partition that's not mounted, or create new partitions in unused space, but GParted won't let you alter any partition that's currently mounted (or otherwise in use). The big caveat to fdisk and gdisk ...


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You can alter only partitions that are not mounted. Since /, /usr, /home, ... are needed to run the system, you will not be able to change the partitions they are on from the running system. All other partitions (e.g. from an OS installed in parallel) can be altered after unmounting them, by sudo umount /mountpoint I think you can unmount directly from ...


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As others have said, it is possible. Before you go too far down that road, though, you must ascertain whether you're booting in BIOS mode with MBR or in EFI mode with GPT. It looks like you're probably BIOS/MBR, unless the Windows partitioning tool is hiding your ESP. To be 100% sure, check this page of mine, which presents more details on boot modes. Which ...


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I would format the drive completely Do clean reinstallation, I don't upgrade Ubuntu to newer versions as it slows the OS down, also it goes wrong sometimes... That's the habit from times, when I was using Windows... and it really helps Install preload: sudo apt-get install preload Preload is a daemon – a background service, in other words – that monitors ...


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I tried to install Ubuntu 15.04 on an Acer Aspire-E15 laptop which has the preinstalled Windows 8.1 and had no Linux before. My first reboot after finishing the Ubuntu installation still automatically went to Windows 8.1 without any clue. The following are the steps I used to solve my problem and may also be useful to those people who want to get the ...


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You can follow this: http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/install-ubuntu-desktop At the fourth step, select "Erase Disk and Install Ubuntu", assuming you wish to wipe the entire 1TB disk and install Ubuntu to it. Use the drop-down menu to select which drive you wish to install Ubuntu to. At that point, you can go ahead and press "Install Now" and continue ...


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/fixmbr normally rewrites the bootloader, so you should expect non-microsoft operating systems to disappear. You may have installed Ubuntu in the wrong mode. First make sure if your current Windows 7 installation is installed in UEFI mode or the legacy BIOS mode? Then boot your Ubuntu live media in the correct mode. Easiest thing would be to reinstall ...


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The swap partition is a part of the shrinked partition , on installing Ubuntu if swap partition is not created by user , it is automatically created by the Ubuntu installer in the shrinked partition. THAT MEANS YOU HAVE CORRECTLY DUAL BOOTED CORRECTLY


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Well from the picture you provided there is no NTFS partition. So you may have accidentally deleted the Windows partition. If so, your best bet is it to try some kind of recovery software. TestDisk is a great utility for recovering lost and damaged partitions. sudo apt-get install testdisk


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The only reason you would need extended and logical partitions is if you have more than 4 partitions. If you have 4 or less, they can all be primary partitions. I was told by someone else that the SWAP partition should be in a extended partition. This is false. I don't know what they were thinking of. Whether a partition is primary or not (or for ...


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First, you can't have 5 primary partitions!!! The max number of primary partitions would be 4 Unless you use GPT, and choosing 4 primary partitions is not that smart idea in general as you'll not be able to add new partitions if needed, instead you should use extended partition that may include many logical partitions. Now For having triple or quad boot,a ...


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Yes ... more than a dual boot is OK as far as multiple linux OS although lately I have not attempted to cut an OSX alongside the others ... as a side note I have tripple booted my nexus 4 mobile : ubuntu 15 / firefox OS / lollipop another approach would be to use a vmware like tool to cut various OS partitions from within your ubuntu


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I managed to solve it , it was pretty silly. I used boot-repair to restore the EFI partition. I created a FAT32 partition of 230mb at the head of the disk and flagged it as boot using gparted. After this, the boot-repair was still complaining about missing the EFI partition ("Your system boot is in efi mode but no efi partition was found. You might want ...


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The small partition (mine is 32 GB*, the same as my RAM) is called SWAP. SWAP is a place for items currently in RAM but not being used to be moved to. It frees up space in the ram and helps prevent crashes. It should be inside an extended partition - and my actual SWAP has Contents Unknown, but shows up as Linux swap (that's the reason for the dotted ...


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That's your SWAP partition it supplements your RAM.


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The message about the missing NTFS files and the blinking cursor after the successful formatting of the partition both point toward the fact that you're not booting from the Ubuntu Live CD / DVD but from the hard drive instead. Most recent laptops (or laptops using a recent enough BIOS) usually have a dedicated key to choose the boot device upon startup ...


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There may be a couple options you can go with, but first I would be sure to check the partitions again. If you boot your computer up using Ubuntu on a live USB, and open GParted what do you see as partitions? Normally on a Windows machine you will see the following: /dev/sda - /dev/sda1 ntfs xGiB /dev/sda2 ntfs xxxGib ...


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You will need to shrink the volume of sda2 to allow space to "install along side Windows". Then you will have the option to install as you wanted, or you can "do something else" and create your own swap, and "/" root partition and install that way.


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Yes, if there are windows files on your hard drive you can choose your default boot option in BIOS, I had almost the same problem and when I boot with my windows boot manager, I was able to use Windows 8.1.


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You can run command in terminal: sudo du -hs /* And check which folder takes the most.


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First, any partitioning operation is at least a little risky. You should always have backups and a recovery plan in case of data loss or a loss of bootability. In the BIOS arena, moving a partition can render it unbootable because many boot loaders rely on absolute sector values to locate more complex parts of themselves. If that sector is in a partition ...


1

I am unfortunately not sure if I understood all questions the right way, so please feel free to ask again if something is not clear: VirtualBox is a usual application as e.g. a Word processor is. That means the application asks the underlying OS (because an OS cares about the resources a computer HW has) for RAM. Of course it is a special application ...


0

I have had better experience when I shrink the boot partition in gparted rather that create a partition for Linux. Once you shrink it, another partition will be created yet remember to make it at least 6.4 GB big. Reboot with live Ubuntu 14 and choose "install Ubuntu". It should then say, "we found you have another OS, would you like to install Ubuntu as ...


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You definitely don't want to mess with /dev/sda2. That is used for booting up your system. It's how your EFI firmware knows where to hand off the boot process to the kernel. As for /dev/sda3 and ~/sda9, those both look like they've either been partitioned in something that Ubuntu can't see (HIGHLY UNLIKELY), or they haven't been partitioned at all. They ...


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SD cards are accessed by circuitry on the computer's motherboard (or an SD card reader attached by USB, etc.). This circuitry requires drivers, and not all of them are well-supported in Linux. The nature of your error smells to me like a buggy driver. If so, you may just have to live with it until a driver fix is released. Filing a bug report may help, but ...


1

I'm going to assume that /dev/sda6 is your currently unused 230G /home partition you want to use, based on the number of blocks. This should work: $ cd / $ sudo mkdir /media/home_backup $ sudo mount /dev/sda6 /media/home_backup # below, -rp flags indicate recursive, and keep owner/permissions $ sudo cp -rp /home/* /media/home_backup $ sudo umount ...


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that is great to hear that you love the new install of Ubuntu. I must admit, that I loved it too and have not looked back at all. The more you play with it, the more you will love it and the more you will realise you don't like the bigger OS's trying to rule the world. Sorry that is my little rant over lol. You can reduce the size, but when I looked into ...


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Try the following: Download Ubuntu's ISO file again AND create the booteable USB again. I had a case with damaged Ubuntu for no apparent reason and it turned out to be an incomplete ISO (with correct file size). Please check your motherboard's BIOS and disable the "Secure Boot" feature. Also, make sure the disk mode is set AHCI (not IDE).


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Upstart is the init system in Ubuntu (till 14.10). It manages services and starts/stops them at appropriate times, and captures their output into logs stored at appropriate locations. Upstart is also able to run services for each user, and the logs of these user-specific services are stored in ~/.cache/upstart by default. Here is it's documentation As to ...


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You can try another GUI tool - KVPM. It helped in my case. I successfully resized a logical volume that was mounted as /home on the fly.



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