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23

Long long time ago... ... There was a time when people used to install Linux and configure it by hand for their specific needs. Some of this is true even today for servers. The choices you see in gparted are some of the popular ones for those who had very different needs as compared with the average desktop users, the intended audience for Ubuntu desktop. ...


15

That's a bad idea. If you put the installed applications on the SSD you'll get a more stable operating system and better performance. You've got a 120GB SSD, so you should not hesitate to use it for your installed applications. Your 750GB hard drive is certainly not there for nothing. Here is my suggestion for how to use the 750GB hard drive optimally. ...


12

Installing the below packages only will auto-mounts your exFAT formatted drives , sudo apt-get install exfat-fuse exfat-utils Or try to mount it manually after installing the above packages, sudo mkdir /media/exfat sudo mount -t exfat /dev/sdxx /media/exfat /dev/sdxx - your exfat partition. In Ubuntu 14.04, exfat-fuse and exfat-utils packages are ...


11

The problem is your connection type, and block size. For the fastest results your block size should be half the lowest write speed you typically receive. This will give you a safe margin, but still allow for a large number; of course you need to have enough ram to hold the data too. Usb 2.0 is 12 megabits per second (Mbps), Usb 2.0 High Speed is 480 Mbps. ...


10

Generic advantages of having multiple partitions: You can use different disks/LUNs and have better performance. This can increase the performance of the databases as you can have the transaction log on a storage and the data files on another. Similar for disk I/O intensive web applications. You can use different mount options (that increase the security or ...


10

In my experience, I don't think there is something faster in the command line as dd. Adjusting the bs parameter can increase the speed, for example, I have 2 HDD that I know have a read/write speed greater than 100 MB/s so I do this: dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/sdb bs=100M There is also pv (Needs to be installed first) that checks for the fastest speed on both ...


10

The Swap Area is basically extra RAM that lives on your hard drive. The Windows equivalent would be the Pagefile. It is much slower than physical RAM, but is necessary in many cases to keep a system running smoothly. You can either make a separate partition for your Swap Area (recommended), or you can go the windows way and make a Swap File on your system ...


9

In the Unity applications dash look for "Disks". It's a disk manager that you can use to apply a partition table (choose mbr/ms-dos), create a partition, and add a filesystem to your second hard drive. Then you should be able to mount the partition, and see it.


9

A swap partition on your SSD will let you wake up faster from hibernation (aka "suspend to disk") as compared to swap on a hard drive. But given the incredibly fast boot time of Ubuntu when booting from SSD a wake up from hibernation may be slower than a reboot. If you do not hibernate you may never need to swap at all. Only in case you often have very ...


9

The "flags" shown in parted or GParted can refer to different things. Some of the common ones on GPT disks include: msftres -- This flag means "Microsoft reserved." It's used as "scratch space" by certain Microsoft tools, so it should not be deleted or re-purposed unless you're deleting Windows. See the Wikipedia entry on this partition type for more ...


7

You cannot shrink/edit a partition if any of the partition on the storage device is mounted. So in order to unmount and edit the root filesystem, the OS need to be shutdown. Then boot into a live system and edit the partition as described in other answers. Alternative solution : swap file As an alternative to creating an entire partition, a swap file ...


6

First of all is important to know that you cannot resize to shrink your root partition if you are using it (This is called online shrinking). You can only grow it online. This is supported by the resize2fs command. I will assume the following: You don't want to loose your information on the root partition. You don't have physical access to the hard drive ...


6

Ok, first, the answers I have seen do not address the 2 most important issues. First, although I applaud your diving in and trying something, the reason you have run into problems is due to an incomplete understanding of the linux directory structure. Please confirm what follows before blindly following my advice as I am not a regular user of the *buntu ...


6

Solid-state drives are not like regular mechanical hard drives in the sense that you can partition the drive to keep data for certain partitions in a specific physical area of the drive platters. You cannot write to a specific memory address on the SSD, like you can with RAM. The SSD controller will distribute data across all of the available memory on the ...


6

Without an existing OS, the installation is easier - you have no need to worry about data retention or compatibility with prior operating systems. I would be tempted to let Ubuntu do whatever it feels like to the disk (it will reformat and partition the disk by itself) unless you have a specific desire to have some partitions, like /home, seperated out.


6

Your disk is probably failing. You probably don't have a virus. You can check your drive SMART data using smartctl -H /dev/sda, but if Ubuntu told you there's a disk error you should believe it. Start copying your data to another drive. Stop using the drive for any other purpose in case you're destroying your documents.


5

Others have posted good information; however, there's one other critical detail: Ubuntu lacks a useful NTFS repair utility. Filesystems occasionally become damaged. Power outages, bugs, system crashes, and other conditions can cause this to happen. When Ubuntu encounters a damaged NTFS volume, Ubuntu will refuse to mount it. Thus, on an Ubuntu-only system, ...


5

You cannot get rid of a GPT partition. GPT is a table type as is an MBR partition table. Since it appears you have a Windows 8 installation disc you can always disable UEFI, and install both operating systems in CSM (legacy bios mode) with an MBR partition table. If you wish to install under UEFI then use GPT for both operating systems. If Ubuntu isn't ...


5

Keep using Unbuntu. If you absolutely need to run a windows program, don't mess around with partitioning, just download VirtualBox, install Windows in that and voilà, not only can you have your cake, you can eat it too.


5

For example in order to increase the virtual disk size to 60GB you need to run the following command: VBoxManage modifyhd "/home/agha/VirtualBox VMs/agha rehan abbas/agha rehan abbas.vdi" -–resize 60000 (size is in MB) Then you need to start you Windows machine and go to Control Panel -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management -> Disk management right ...


5

Download Gparted Live CD .iso from here and burn it using Brasero Boot from it skip language To start up the default graphical environment Press Enter That's is Now start Gparted


5

Try writing to those blocks: sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda6 bs=1024 count=1 seek=303975848 sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda6 bs=1024 count=1 seek=303975849 sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda6 bs=1024 count=1 seek=303975850 sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda6 bs=1024 count=1 seek=303975851 (or in your case, you could collapse that to a single dd call with ...


5

This is written so it can be read all the way through, skimmed, or sections can be skipped. However, I highly recommend looking at the last section ("you might not really be limited to 4 partitions at all") before deciding what to do, in case you have a GPT-formatted disk or otherwise are not subject to the 4-partition limit. Multiple "Filesystems" on the ...


5

You can shrink/extend a logical volume very easily with a GUI tool: system-config-lvm. Because system-config-lvm is not come pre-installed, once booted from a live-cd, you have to install it: $ sudo add-apt-repository "deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu $(lsb_release -sc) universe" $ sudo apt-get install system-config-lvm Once it is installed, run the ...


5

The tmpfs filesystem is a RAMDISK. The following will create a 2G RAMDISK that will always be available. sudo mkdir -p /media/ramdisk sudo mount -t tmpfs -o size=2048M tmpfs /media/ramdisk The ramdisk folder is owned by root as it is to be available on reboot. The ramdisk permissions should be writeable by everyone. The tmpfs default permissions (chmod ...


4

I was getting the same error message. I tried what is being suggested here but the error persisted. (By the way, instructions given in one of the links there is incomplete. Read comments from others underneath the post and that should take you to the right direction). I came across this post that solved the problem for me by delaying swapon. I did the ...


4

To most "logical" thing you can do is: Expand your 4th and last Primary Partition (sda4) which is an Extended Partition (which merely serves as a container for Logical Partitions) so as to include the unallocated space at the end. Then create another Logical Partition (or more) at the end of sda4. However, you can only do this if and when the Extended ...


4

It seems plausible that your fifteen installed kernels are consuming too much space on your root (/) filesystem. You can remove these with the dpkg command, at least assuming you can boot up and log in. Use the -P option, as in: sudo dpkg -P linux-image-3.5.0-17-generic Remove the oldest of your kernels (unless you're having problems with newer ones, in ...


4

You shouldn't have to repartition the disk just to reinstall Ubuntu. It seems like you just have one partition for Ubuntu, and one Swap partition in an extended partition, which is a standard partitioning scheme for an Ubuntu installation. You could boot the Ubuntu iso from the Grub menu. When you boot from the iso file, you will be able to press a key upon ...


4

Use gdisk and verify partitions are correct with p, and use w to write the partition table. If not correct just use q to quit. That should update primary, backup & protective MBR. sudo gdisk /dev/sda Command (? for help):



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