Hot answers tagged

29

You cannot uninstall GRUB. As your installation stands, GRUB is necessary to boot Ubuntu (that's why it's called the bootloader). Every OS has a bootloader, and every OS needs that bootloader to boot (lots of booting :P). EDIT: As people in the comments have pointed out, there are alternatives to using GRUB. However, there is no reason to switch to one, ...


28

The problem you are describing was caused by a low-level device tool (like dd) writing blocks at the wrong size directly onto the device. To fix this, you need to re-write the device blocks to the appropriate size. This can be done with dd. Double check your output device before running the command sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdd bs=2048 count=32 ...


19

A system is never 100% secure and there are always vulnerabilities, in every OS. Some are known and some still want to get discovered though. It's a fact though that the UNIX/Linux security architecture (from which also Apple's OSX is derived) is much stronger than the one Windows had in the past and I believe it's even still slightly stronger than what they ...


18

No, you don't need a swap partition, as long as you never run out of RAM your system will work fine without it, but it can come in handy if you have less than 8GB of RAM and it is necessary for hibernation. For more information see this question: Do we still need swap partitions on desktop? However, you can get around the 4 partition limit by creating an ...


17

A command-line method to make a live USB for UEFI systems Please note: this deletes all data on the target device. Install prerequisite: sudo apt-get install p7zip-full Assuming the target USB is at /dev/sdb (please check first with gnome-disks or sudo fdisk -l and be sure you know what you are formatting) Destroy existing partition table: sudo ...


15

Systems with a Linux kernel have been in widespread use for a long time, and unlike the typical desktop computer, they are always online and actively accepting connections. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux#Servers.2C_mainframes_and_supercomputers What's more, compromising a single web server is a much higher-value target than compromising a single ...


11

I have been able to solve the problem. I have tried to format it on Windows too but the problem persisted. Same thing with gparted and Disks too. So I did the following: sudo -i fdisk /dev/sdx (in my case was sda) n -set attributes as default- w After that, went to gparted and reformatted as ntfs. And bingo!


9

You Can always try using fdisk Open a terminal (Ctl+ALt+t) and type sudo fdisk /dev/sdy where /dev/sdy = The device file for your flash drive. Once you get fdisk open, type p to list the partition table, Once you know where it is located you can use d # to delete it. (# = The partition; ExAMPLE d 1, d 2) w writes the partition table back to the disk and ...


9

All the other answers start good, advising you that GRUB is usually there whether you see it or not, you probably shouldn't start taking random potshots at it, and how to restore your system to the 'hidden GRUB' you (presumably) previously enjoyed. However, they end up going wrong - in making blanket statements that GRUB is always required, when this is ...


9

It is generally not recommended to work on disks and partitions from within a running operating system. So prepare the disk before installing any system to avoid possible trouble later on. Boot from the Ubuntu installation media you created before and select Try Ubuntu without installing. Open GParted, create a new partition table. This will erase the ...


8

You need to disable Windows fast start-up option. Open Control Panel -> Energy Settings and select Change what the power buttons do. Choose Change settings that are currently unavailable, scroll down and uncheck Turn on fast start-up (recommended). Restart the computer and you won't have this error anymore. See here for more informations about Windows ...


7

You don't really need a swap partition. In our times computers have 4GB of RAM or more. That is normally enough for daily use. But... If you do RAM heavy tasks your machine might run out of RAM... and crash. In my opinion a good solution for you is to install Ubuntu on that single partition an add maybe 1GB of swap as a swapfile. Here is a good ...


7

It sounds like for your purposes it's enough to simply format the drive, not overwrite it. Overwriting would be necessary if you wanted to make sure no previously saved data would be recoverable in the future. But it sounds like you don't need that. Rather, you need to format it, and perform a clean install of Ubuntu. Yes, this is totally possible. Boot ...


6

I had same problem. Try: ntfsfix /dev/sda5 "remove_hiberfile" option no longer works. "ntfs-3g" package policy is to use the new tool ntfsfix However, this tool didn't work for me either. So I plugged the hard disk in a Windows machine, turned off "Fast Startup" in power button options from within Windows, then shutdown and replaced back the hd in my ...


6

There is no default partition format for Linux. It can handle many partition formats. For a Linux-only system, either use MBR or GPT will work fine. MBR is more common, but GPT has some advantages, including support for larger disks. The main issue with GPT is compatibility; not all OSes support it, and some can't boot from GPT on BIOS-based computers. For ...


6

I have found the cause of my issue. In /etc/fstab, the swap partition was referencing a non-existing partition UID. I updated it, and now my system boots just fine!


6

No, it is not a bad thing. I have been using a /home on my sdd for at least 2 years. But I did change /home/$USER/.config/user-dirs.dirs so all my user directories point to my HDD. Those directories (like Downloads and Desktop are my 2 main areas where things get written and stored). I plan for failure: my SDD has -no- personal data. If it fails I buy me ...


6

You can do everything from inside the Ubuntu installer. The minimum effort option is to select one of the "Use whole disk" variants, which should already do the right thing. If you want to customize the partition layout, you can use the partition editor inside the installation tool as well, the only important bit is that you need to keep one FAT partition ...


6

It is found that the problem is due to a bug in usb-creator-gtk. It is setting improper block-size during the creation of bootable media. If this bug affects you, you can mark it here : https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/usb-creator/+bug/1589028


6

No problem. That is normal when you have 2 or more operating systems. Pretty simple. Assume you have an empty disk and boot into the installation and are at the partitioning setup. create 4 partitions. Ubuntu OS needs a root of about 25Gb that can include a /home/. 25Gb is more than enough if you keep your own data outside of the system (ie. out of / and ...


5

The actual intention of a virtual machine is to provide an isolated environment, separated from the host's environment. You can not directly mount "real" partitions in the virtual machine, and, honestly, you shouldn't. If you only want to access some files from within the VM, you can create host-guest shares. If you are using VirtualBox, this can be done ...


5

That package name is iptables not iptable use command : sudo apt-get install iptables


5

The general rule is to edit Windows partitions in Windows, and Linux partitions in Linux. Although Windows-made partitions can be edited in Linux, but not the other way around. I would suggest making a live USB with Ubuntu, boot into it, and shrink the hard disk Ubuntu partition from there. You need to unmount the partition before you edit it though.


5

Swap partitions do two things: they can provide an overall speed boost by freeing up memory for more cache, and they can prevent rare disastrous out-of-memory situations where the system will start killing processes without warning. If you have tons of RAM, you probably aren't needing it for a speed boost - it'll almost never be utilised. But it is still a ...


5

You can try to select "Create partition table", under the device menu in Gparted, in order to fully reformat it. (Select msdos as the partition table type). Then, you should be able to create a new partition on the USB stick. If that doesn't work, a very simple (But slow, and I'm sure there's a better way) way to fix this would be to simply overwrite the ...


5

The Error in your screenshot does not refer to the HDD space as you have rightfully pointed. It refers to the size of the "Device" in this case your tilestache cache. Please check if there some junk files or old unused cache files. If so you can safely remove them and try again. In case you require further information, refer to the following thread. http:/...


5

Yes, Ubuntu needs that EFI partition. UEFI is a (relatively) new method of booting for operating systems, and is much more featured than legacy/BIOS boot. Look it up for some more details. If you don't copy it over, you aren't going to be able to boot, as it stores the bootloader files for OSes that support EFI. There may be Windows stuff left over, but ...


4

I hade same problem. I REMOVED THE GRUB. Just download widows 8 or 10 from another pc. Burn the iso into the USB with Rufus. Boot from USB click troubleshooting, command prompt type: Bootrec /fixmbr. Windows will start normally without grub(Ubuntu) . You can reinstall Ubuntu again.


4

It happens because of the partial hibernation of Windows (From Windows 8). I hope you are trying to open a drive from your dual booted system which is shutdowned from Windows last time. A quick and dirty way to fix this problem is, executing the following command on each drives: sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdxx where xx is device and partition letter and number ie:...


4

For whatever reason (probably due to updating and Windows 10 using a different boot method or something akin to that) the listing of available operating systems has gone missing. This is something that can be fixed in a number of different ways. The simplest one to try is this: Open the terminal by pressing CTRL+ALT+T. Enter this command: sudo update-grub ...



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