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13

I was just doing exactly that a minute ago. What you want to do is: In the machine's settings point the CD Drive to the .iso file with your Ubuntu LiveCD Power the virtual machine on and hit F2 with the focus inside the machine. Once inside the BIOS move to the Boot tab and select CD-Rom as primary boot device. Run gParted - I think it's always there. ...


9

Well I finally solved the Problem using the fixparts command... it needs gdisk utility to be installed. Following are the commands I ran to make the install. $ sudo apt-get install gdisk $ sudo fixparts /dev/sda and then press the key 'w' Done! For more information on what FixParts is and what it is for can be found at rodsbooks. FixParts has evolved ...


8

I have done some reading & research but I`m rather confused about the whole issue of partitionning ie can I do that if I already have the following partitions: Boot: 75GB used 47.5GB free (system NTFS) Recover: 7.20GB used 19.20GB free (system FAT32) Yes that is possible. Also I don`t quite understand LIVE CDs beyond that they are the ...


8

This is the crucial part in your message ... "The disk contains an unclean file system" "The NTFS partition is in an unsafe state" Remember... windows discs need to be checked for filesystem problems. You can try to fix this from Ubuntu with ntfsprogs. If not installed ... sudo apt-get install ntfsprogs and this will try to clean the disc ... ...


7

A swap partition on your SSD will let you wake up faster from hibernation (aka "suspend to disk") as compared to swap on a hard drive. But given the incredibly fast boot time of Ubuntu when booting from SSD a wake up from hibernation may be slower than a reboot. If you do not hibernate you may never need to swap at all. Only in case you often have very ...


6

If you have blank disk Boot into Ubuntu Installation media. This can be either CD or USB stick. Start the installation. Proceed to Step 4 and choose "Something else": You will see your disk as /dev/sda or /dev/mapper/pdc_* (RAID case, * means that your letters are different from ours) Click "New Partition Table..." You will see that you have free space ...


6

It does not work like that in Ubuntu (and in Linux in general). Unlike Windows, Ubuntu does not keep all the files needed for an application in a single folders. Rather it shares common files needed by the system as well as other apps. So, files are stored in folders for different types of common files/libraries. The default installation of Ubuntu ...


6

Your windows partition is hibernated. If you have fastboot enabled disable it as it hibernates every time you shut down. In my opinion it is better to disable hibernation completely so that you never encounter this issue. Forewarning: Disabling fastboot will cause your windows to boot significantly slower. Disabling Hibernation will cause it to boot a ...


5

There are many tools that can do this, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Clonezilla is a utility that's often used for this task; however, I'm not sure how well it would cope with the fact that your target disk is smaller than the source disk. Another option is to manually partition the target (using GParted, parted, fdisk, gdisk, or some ...


5

This is written so it can be read all the way through, skimmed, or sections can be skipped. However, I highly recommend looking at the last section ("you might not really be limited to 4 partitions at all") before deciding what to do, in case you have a GPT-formatted disk or otherwise are not subject to the 4-partition limit. Multiple "Filesystems" on the ...


4

It seems plausible that your fifteen installed kernels are consuming too much space on your root (/) filesystem. You can remove these with the dpkg command, at least assuming you can boot up and log in. Use the -P option, as in: sudo dpkg -P linux-image-3.5.0-17-generic Remove the oldest of your kernels (unless you're having problems with newer ones, in ...


4

The "flags" shown in parted or GParted can refer to different things. Some of the common ones on GPT disks include: msftres -- This flag means "Microsoft reserved." It's used as "scratch space" by certain Microsoft tools, so it should not be deleted or re-purposed unless you're deleting Windows. See the Wikipedia entry on this partition type for more ...


4

The restriction to 4 primary partitions is not specifically a Linux thing but bound to the used MBR partitioning scheme in general. To overcome this limitation, extended partitions was invented. So what you actually want is this: /dev/sda /dev/sda1 (Windows Reserved Partition) /dev/sda2 (Windows Partition C:) /dev/sda3 (Ubuntu SWAP) ...


4

Danatela is correct; however: It's common practice to use a primary partition for a single-partition disk like this. Although a logical partition will work for this purpose, it involves somewhat more complex data structures than a primary partition, those data structures end up reducing the size of the partition (by an admittedly minuscule amount), and ...


4

If this is part of a wide-ranging update, perhaps a centralised file server with some redundancy might be in order. There are many systems and protocols that work for both Windows and Linux and will provide next-to-native performance (if not better). That would leave all important stuff off the SSDs and free for applications and swap. It's more costly ...


4

You also have the 4 primary partition issue. My laptop already has 4 primary partitions: how can I install Ubuntu? Be sure to create recovery DVD(s) first as well as a Windows repair CD. HP Tools Partition discussion If you shrink Windows using Windows disk tools and backup HP tools. You can then use gparted to create one large extended partition and ...


4

Using the "Erase entire disk", will erase all partitions. Since you're new, I would recommend to start with dual booting with Windows first. Get used to Ubuntu and then you may decide later to remove Windows completely. This is especially recommended if you do not have recovery media or another means of reinstalling Windows should you wish to. In any case, ...


4

To most "logical" thing you can do is: Expand your 4th and last Primary Partition (sda4) which is an Extended Partition (which merely serves as a container for Logical Partitions) so as to include the unallocated space at the end. Then create another Logical Partition (or more) at the end of sda4. However, you can only do this if and when the Extended ...


4

You shouldn't have to repartition the disk just to reinstall Ubuntu. It seems like you just have one partition for Ubuntu, and one Swap partition in an extended partition, which is a standard partitioning scheme for an Ubuntu installation. You could boot the Ubuntu iso from the Grub menu. When you boot from the iso file, you will be able to press a key upon ...


4

Run parted interactively, then use the print devices command, like below: sudo parted GNU Parted 2.3 Using /dev/xvda1 Welcome to GNU Parted! Type 'help' to view a list of commands. (parted) print devices /dev/xvda1 (8590MB) /dev/xvdb (429GB)


4

Yes, there is a way to resize your partitions. However, depending on the different partitions you have and their locations, it might be a long process to resize. Nonetheless, here's what you can do, and what I always do. This method uses a utility called GParted. Before we begin, it is advisable that you take a backup of your data. Step 1 Boot up from the ...


4

Uwe Plonus's explanation is correct, but gives no solution to your problem. Here's the solution: Boot a Linux emergency disc. (The Ubuntu installer in its "try before installing" mode should work fine; or you can use Parted Magic or something similar. Launch GParted. If any of the logical partitions (those with numbers of 5 and up) are locked (typically ...


4

For a RAID option during installation using Raring 13.04 media, your best bet is the minimal ISO, either 32-bit or 64-bit. These ISO's are a text-based installer which will present you with the option for Software RAID during the install. You must select the "Manual" partition option to be able to select Software RAID. Keep in mind that these ISO's ...


4

The Grub2/installer does not always manage EFI. Best option is to boot the live CD and use boot repair. See : How do I install Windows 7 alongside a pre-existing Ubuntu installation? Different question, same solution. Post the url bootrepair gives you if it does not work.


4

You could add system ("sudo apt-get remove $(dpkg -l|egrep '^ii linux-(im|he)'|awk '{print $2}'|grep -v `uname -r`)"); to some line in the apt source code for upgrading packages. Alternatively, just make a script called aptupgrade and paste this in it: sudo apt-get remove $(dpkg -l|egrep '^ii linux-(im|he)'|awk '{print $2}'|grep -v `uname -r`); sudo ...


3

Theoretically, you can format your 3TB disk to work with your old motherboard with BIOS via partitioning it with a GPT partition table rather than MSDOS. However, it's not totally foolproof. Some BIOSes attempt to validate partition tables when they should not and that can cause problems because of the "protective MBR" that a GPT-partitioned disk uses. Do ...


3

I believe you're looking for something along the lines of this question previously asked: How can I determine a folder's size from the command line? EDIT: So, I did... sudo du -sh / and got 56 gigs total from root /, then did sudo du -sh /home/ and got 20 gigs total from all of /home/ ... so, in theory, I just subtracted the 2nd value from the ...


3

From personal experience I can say that running games (especially newer ones) through wine, although possible, can be a very frustrating process. Even if you eventually get them to run, there will be some reduction in performance. There are some comercial tools (crossover comes to mind) for running windows applications on linux, but I have never tried ...


3

If you intend to use Windows in the future, you should choose NTFS. For more imformations see Understanding file systems(NTFS, FAT, FAT32,Ext2, Ext3, Ext4 etc.).


3

Since you choose "Overwrite the Windows 8 OS" I think her files are gone. Since "Overwrite" means "Overwrite". It has installed Ubuntu over her Win8 OS. If you wanted a "Dual boot" you should choose "Install along side Windows 8" or "Something else".. Afraid her data is lost...



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