Hot answers tagged

26

A system is never 100% secure and there are always vulnerabilities, in every OS. Some are known and some still want to get discovered though. It's a fact though that the UNIX/Linux security architecture (from which also Apple's OSX is derived) is much stronger than the one Windows had in the past and I believe it's even still slightly stronger than what they ...


26

You cannot uninstall GRUB. As your installation stands, GRUB is necessary to boot Ubuntu (that's why it's called the bootloader). Every OS has a bootloader, and every OS needs that bootloader to boot (lots of booting :P). EDIT: As people in the comments have pointed out, there are alternatives to using GRUB. However, there is no reason to switch to one, ...


17

Keep the /home partition Yes! You can keep the existing home partition using one of the advanced installation options called Something Else After choosing this option, you will be able to tell the installation process to use the existing / and /home partitions. Make sure to choose to format / partition as ext4 and Not format (remove the check mark) ...


15

Systems with a Linux kernel have been in widespread use for a long time, and unlike the typical desktop computer, they are always online and actively accepting connections. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux#Servers.2C_mainframes_and_supercomputers What's more, compromising a single web server is a much higher-value target than compromising a single ...


13

First, note there is a typo in mount your command. It should be: $ sudo mount /dev/sda2 /media/username Here /dev/sda2 is the device (in this case, a hard drive's partition) you want to access, and /media/username is your mountpoint, i.e., the location in the filesystem where you want to mount the device. To answer your questions: Yes, using cd is the ...


13

In general, they should leave each other alone. If you do the install correctly (Windows first, then Linux, as a rule, because Linux is more 'considerate'). As far as I am aware, there is no additional risk involved in sharing a drive. Having said that, here are some gotchas to watch out for. Windows will not be able to see the contents of your Linux ...


13

No, you don't need a swap partition, as long as you never run out of RAM your system will work fine without it, but it can come in handy if you have less than 8GB of RAM and it is necessary for hibernation. For more information see this question: Do we still need swap partitions on desktop? However, you can get around the 4 partition limit by creating an ...


10

It is safer to use 2 hard disks. during formatting it is easier to recognize the different hard disks. 1 will be named sda and the other sdb. Though the installer puts names next to bootable partitions it does help to find other partitions that belong to that specific OS (like a D: drive will be sda2 on sda where sda1 is the OS for Windows or db2 is a ...


10

First some background:The rule of thumb in use for the last 25 years has been a minimum of 1xRAM and maximum 2xRAM. That minimum today is chosen so hibernation is possible and the maximum because of diminishing returns: it's just too slow to have to swap so much memory as HDD access is a factor of 1000 slower then RAM: good in an emergency, but not really ...


8

There are several advantages to GPT: Supports disks larger than 2TiB. Supports partitions larger than 2TiB. Supports more than four partitions, with no distinction between primary, extended, and logical partitions. Uses GUIDs as type codes, which means there's less risk of conflicting/duplicate codes. Uses LBA addressing exclusively, compared to MBR's dual ...


8

All the other answers start good, advising you that GRUB is usually there whether you see it or not, you probably shouldn't start taking random potshots at it, and how to restore your system to the 'hidden GRUB' you (presumably) previously enjoyed. However, they end up going wrong - in making blanket statements that GRUB is always required, when this is ...


7

You cannot do this from within a running Ubuntu operating system. The system and the swap partition must be mounted to work at all. So you need a live media and do it from within there. Boot from the Ubuntu (DVD/USB) installation media. Select Try Ubuntu without installing, on Live desktop, Open GParted - the partitions are unmounted - resize. Note ...


7

Boot into Windows - disable hibernation and Fast Boot. Open command prompt as administrator and execute: powercfg /h off In case you installed Windows 8 or 10 in EFI mode: Open Windows Control Panel -> Energy Settings. Enable show hidden settings - uncheck Fast Boot. Shutdown the machine completely, do NOT reboot. Boot into BIOS - select Ubuntu to be ...


7

From the fdisk and lsblk output we can see that: /dev/sda1 is your main partition, and is used for the root mount point (/), which holds everything else. How to understand the Ubuntu file system layout? /dev/sda2 is an extended partition - which means you are using an MBR partition table instead of GPT. The Ubuntu installer usually sets up one extended ...


7

The /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-root in place of a traditional /dev/sdxN block device just indicates that you chose to install the system using LVM2 logical volume management. See What is LVM and what is it used for?


7

Yes ... you are having the right idea. Boot from GParted Live media. You as well can do it from Ubuntu install media (GParted included). Important : Unmount all partitions (in case there are any mounted). First move the sda6 partition to the left ... then move the sda7 partition to the left. Now extend the sda7 ext4 partition - it is not necessary to move ...


7

You need to disable Windows fast start-up option. Open Control Panel -> Energy Settings and select Change what the power buttons do. Choose Change settings that are currently unavailable, scroll down and uncheck Turn on fast start-up (recommended). Restart the computer and you won't have this error anymore. See here for more informations about Windows ...


6

Extended partitions are like containers for logical volumes. But unfortunately, you can't just move the whole container. Maybe it helps if you imagine partitions as cardboard boxes. A primary partition is a standard box and logical volumes are like little boxes that have to stay inside an extended partition. Now the interesting thing is how the extended ...


6

You can just copy everything inside it (i.e. e.g. sudo cp -R /boot/efi /path/to/backup is fine, however personally I'd suggest to use tar: sudo tar cfz /path/to/backup/ESP_backup.tar.gz /boot/efi); The filesystem in which to store the backup is irrelevant; the only concern might be the permissions, but the UEFI firmware doesn't cater for Linux permissions ...


6

Use built-in Disks tool (gnome-disk-utility) to create the Ubuntu installation media properly. Open Disks - select Restore Disk Image from the menu on the top right. Choose the ISO file and the USB drive to write it to and start restoring.


6

WARNING Partitioning always holds a risk of data loss. Moving the left borders of partitions may lead to boot failure. Especially as you did a Wubi installation I can't predict how it will react. MAKE A BACKUP BEFORE PROCEEDING! First, you need to boot from a live system, e.g. your Ubuntu installation medium. From there, start GParted. You ...


6

First you have to boot into Windows and disable hibernation and Fast Boot from within there. To disable hibernation open command prompt as administrator and execute this command: powercfg /h off To disable Fast Boot open Control Panel go to Energy Settings, enable show hidden settings and uncheck Fast Boot. After these steps shutdown the machine ...


6

Because those values aren't UUIDs; they're NTFS serial numbers. They're identified as UUIDs in /etc/fstab (and elsewhere) because the developers chose to use the identifier "UUID" for fundamentally non-UUID data, rather than use some other identifier. The same is true of FAT, by the way, but FAT serial numbers are even shorter than NTFS serial numbers.


6

What should I do ? You should STOP ! Installing Ubuntu via wubi is not recommended. Download the Ubuntu desktop installation image. Burn this ISO file to a DVD or create an USB media. Boot from the installation media and install Ubuntu. Read about all details in the Ubuntu installation guide. To create an USB media from within Windows properly, open ...


5

You cannot see a partition in Windows because you did not create one - it is unallocated space. Download an Ubuntu installation image and burn the ISO file to a DVD or create an USB media. To create the USB media in Windows - open command prompt as administrator and execute : diskpart list disk select disk * clean create partition primary active ...


5

The key you see means that the partition is mounted. Unmounting a running Ubuntu system is not possible. Boot from the Ubuntu installation Live media. Open GParted - no partition will be mounted. In case you mounted a partition intentionally, Right-click the partition and select Unmount. Now you can work on the selected partition. By the way, Ubuntu ...


5

Ext4 file system is recommended for all Linux operating systems because has backwards compatibility with its predecessors, you can mount Ext2 and Ext3 as an Ext4 file system Ext4 reduces file fragmentation employs delayed allocation which helps with flash memory life as well as fragmentation. Good choice for SSDs and HDD BtrFS it allows for drive ...


5

The general rule is to edit Windows partitions in Windows, and Linux partitions in Linux. Although Windows-made partitions can be edited in Linux, but not the other way around. I would suggest making a live USB with Ubuntu, boot into it, and shrink the hard disk Ubuntu partition from there. You need to unmount the partition before you edit it though.


5

To get rid of the swap partition, use GParted. Boot from the Ubuntu installation media. Select Try Ubuntu without installing. On Live desktop open GParted - delete the swap partition. Grow the Ubuntu partition, just add the unallocated space.



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