Hot answers tagged

30

You cannot uninstall GRUB. As your installation stands, GRUB is necessary to boot Ubuntu (that's why it's called the bootloader). Every OS has a bootloader, and every OS needs that bootloader to boot (lots of booting :P). EDIT: As people in the comments have pointed out, there are alternatives to using GRUB. However, there is no reason to switch to one, ...


25

A system is never 100% secure and there are always vulnerabilities, in every OS. Some are known and some still want to get discovered though. It's a fact though that the UNIX/Linux security architecture (from which also Apple's OSX is derived) is much stronger than the one Windows had in the past and I believe it's even still slightly stronger than what they ...


18

The problem you are describing was caused by a low-level device tool (like dd) writing blocks at the wrong size directly onto the device. To fix this, you need to re-write the device blocks to the appropriate size. This can be done with dd. Double check your output device before running the command sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdd bs=2048 Once the dd ...


18

No, you don't need a swap partition, as long as you never run out of RAM your system will work fine without it, but it can come in handy if you have less than 8GB of RAM and it is necessary for hibernation. For more information see this question: Do we still need swap partitions on desktop? However, you can get around the 4 partition limit by creating an ...


17

Keep the /home partition Yes! You can keep the existing home partition using one of the advanced installation options called Something Else After choosing this option, you will be able to tell the installation process to use the existing / and /home partitions. Make sure to choose to format / partition as ext4 and Not format (remove the check mark) ...


15

Systems with a Linux kernel have been in widespread use for a long time, and unlike the typical desktop computer, they are always online and actively accepting connections. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux#Servers.2C_mainframes_and_supercomputers What's more, compromising a single web server is a much higher-value target than compromising a single ...


14

It is generally not recommended to work on disks and partitions from within a running operating system. So prepare the disk before installing any system to avoid possible trouble later on. Boot from the Ubuntu installation media you created before and select Try Ubuntu without installing. Open GParted, create a new partition table. This will erase the ...


12

The most convenient and reliable way to prepare a disk is using the GNOME partition editor. GParted is included in the Ubuntu installation media, but in some cases it is better to use the original. When you boot from the Ubuntu install media and you already have a swap partition, the partition is mounted. Partition swapoff and unmount unfortunately does not ...


11

I have been able to solve the problem. I have tried to format it on Windows too but the problem persisted. Same thing with gparted and Disks too. So I did the following: sudo -i fdisk /dev/sdx (in my case was sda) n -set attributes as default- w After that, went to gparted and reformatted as ntfs. And bingo!


9

You need to disable Windows fast start-up option. Open Control Panel -> Energy Settings and select Change what the power buttons do. Choose Change settings that are currently unavailable, scroll down and uncheck Turn on fast start-up (recommended). Restart the computer and you won't have this error anymore. See here for more informations about Windows ...


9

All the other answers start good, advising you that GRUB is usually there whether you see it or not, you probably shouldn't start taking random potshots at it, and how to restore your system to the 'hidden GRUB' you (presumably) previously enjoyed. However, they end up going wrong - in making blanket statements that GRUB is always required, when this is ...


8

You Can always try using fdisk Open a terminal (Ctl+ALt+t) and type sudo fdisk /dev/sdy where /dev/sdy = The device file for your flash drive. Once you get fdisk open, type p to list the partition table, Once you know where it is located you can use d # to delete it. (# = The partition; ExAMPLE d 1, d 2) w writes the partition table back to the disk and ...


8

You cannot do this from within a running Ubuntu operating system. The system and the swap partition must be mounted to work at all. So you need a live media and do it from within there. Boot from the Ubuntu (DVD/USB) installation media. Select Try Ubuntu without installing, on Live desktop, Open GParted - the partitions are unmounted - resize. Note ...


7

Use built-in Disks tool (gnome-disk-utility) to create the Ubuntu installation media properly. Open Disks - select Restore Disk Image from the menu on the top right. Choose the ISO file and the USB drive to write it to and start restoring.


7

Yes ... you are having the right idea. Boot from GParted Live media. You as well can do it from Ubuntu install media (GParted included). Important : Unmount all partitions (in case there are any mounted). First move the sda6 partition to the left ... then move the sda7 partition to the left. Now extend the sda7 ext4 partition - it is not necessary to move ...


7

Boot into Windows - disable hibernation and Fast Boot. Open command prompt as administrator and execute: powercfg /h off In case you installed Windows 8 or 10 in EFI mode: Open Windows Control Panel -> Energy Settings. Enable show hidden settings - uncheck Fast Boot. Shutdown the machine completely, do NOT reboot. Boot into BIOS - select Ubuntu to be ...


7

You don't really need a swap partition. In our times computers have 4GB of RAM or more. That is normally enough for daily use. But... If you do RAM heavy tasks your machine might run out of RAM... and crash. In my opinion a good solution for you is to install Ubuntu on that single partition an add maybe 1GB of swap as a swapfile. Here is a good ...


7

It sounds like for your purposes it's enough to simply format the drive, not overwrite it. Overwriting would be necessary if you wanted to make sure no previously saved data would be recoverable in the future. But it sounds like you don't need that. Rather, you need to format it, and perform a clean install of Ubuntu. Yes, this is totally possible. Boot ...


6

Extended partitions are like containers for logical volumes. But unfortunately, you can't just move the whole container. Maybe it helps if you imagine partitions as cardboard boxes. A primary partition is a standard box and logical volumes are like little boxes that have to stay inside an extended partition. Now the interesting thing is how the extended ...


6

There is no default partition format for Linux. It can handle many partition formats. For a Linux-only system, either use MBR or GPT will work fine. MBR is more common, but GPT has some advantages, including support for larger disks. The main issue with GPT is compatibility; not all OSes support it, and some can't boot from GPT on BIOS-based computers. For ...


6

What you've got is a broken USB key. Most of the time on brand names, the memory cells go first whereas with cheap brands it's the control circuit that goes first. You've got a prime example of memory cell fatigue. Just throw the key away and buy a new one. I would advise you to buy an SLC USB key. I've got an 8GB Kingston Data Traveller that is still ...


6

I have found the cause of my issue. In /etc/fstab, the swap partition was referencing a non-existing partition UID. I updated it, and now my system boots just fine!


6

WARNING Partitioning always holds a risk of data loss. Moving the left borders of partitions may lead to boot failure. Especially as you did a Wubi installation I can't predict how it will react. MAKE A BACKUP BEFORE PROCEEDING! First, you need to boot from a live system, e.g. your Ubuntu installation medium. From there, start GParted. You ...


6

First you have to boot into Windows and disable hibernation and Fast Boot from within there. To disable hibernation open command prompt as administrator and execute this command: powercfg /h off To disable Fast Boot open Control Panel go to Energy Settings, enable show hidden settings and uncheck Fast Boot. After these steps shutdown the machine ...


6

You can just copy everything inside it (i.e. e.g. sudo cp -R /boot/efi /path/to/backup is fine, however personally I'd suggest to use tar: sudo tar cfz /path/to/backup/ESP_backup.tar.gz /boot/efi); The filesystem in which to store the backup is irrelevant; the only concern might be the permissions, but the UEFI firmware doesn't cater for Linux permissions ...


6

What should I do ? You should STOP ! Installing Ubuntu via wubi is not recommended. Download the Ubuntu desktop installation image. Burn this ISO file to a DVD or create an USB media. Boot from the installation media and install Ubuntu. Read about all details in the Ubuntu installation guide. To create an USB media from within Windows properly, open ...


6

Boot from Ubuntu installation media. Select 'Try Ubuntu without installing'. Open GParted -> press the Windows key and type GParted. Open GParted and delete all partitions you find on the disk. Create a new partition - format it with ext4 - a size that fits your needs. Create a new partition - format it with swap - a size matching the RAM. On the ...


6

You can do everything from inside the Ubuntu installer. The minimum effort option is to select one of the "Use whole disk" variants, which should already do the right thing. If you want to customize the partition layout, you can use the partition editor inside the installation tool as well, the only important bit is that you need to keep one FAT partition ...


5

To achieve what you want and to prepare your disk for eventual changes in the future: Boot from an Ubuntu Live DVD or USB. Open the built-in tool gparted. Delete the Linux swap partition sda5. Delete the extended partition sda2. Resize (reduce) the partition sda1. Create a new primary partition. Format the partition as swap. Create a new ...


5

I had same problem. Try: ntfsfix /dev/sda5 "remove_hiberfile" option no longer works. "ntfs-3g" package policy is to use the new tool ntfsfix However, this tool didn't work for me either. So I plugged the hard disk in a Windows machine, turned off "Fast Startup" in power button options from within Windows, then shutdown and replaced back the hd in my ...



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