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11

In general, they should leave each other alone. If you do the install correctly (Windows first, then Linux, as a rule, because Linux is more 'considerate'). As far as I am aware, there is no additional risk involved in sharing a drive. Having said that, here are some gotchas to watch out for. 1) Windows will not be able to see the contents of your Linux ...


10

Short answer: It doesn't matter at all. Detailed answer: There is absolutely no risk with keeping two operating systems on the same disk device. You can mess with another system partition as long as the disk device with that partition is accesible, putting it on separate physical device doesn't make it safer (nor less safe) in any way.


9

It is safer to use 2 hard disks. during formatting it is easier to recognize the different hard disks. 1 will be named sda and the other sdb. Though the installer puts names next to bootable partitions it does help to find other partitions that belong to that specific OS (like a D: drive will be sda2 on sda where sda1 is the OS for Windows or db2 is a ...


5

As long as you always mount your separate data partition I can see little if no benefits for the security aspects you mentioned. Any mounted partition including your data partition can be written to by you and by all your applications in case you had the appropriate permissons. A virtualised Windows will however only be able to access you data in case you ...


3

For that kind of setup, you don't need to do anything special. It's essentially just a normal desktop installation of Ubuntu, so at minimum all you need is one big partition, plus some swap space (usually in another partition). Unless you have any specific requirement that would require something else, I'd recommend just going with the default partitioning ...


3

Please read What are "/run/lock" and "/run/shm" used for? and see why what you are asking is not possible and not going to help you create space on / and that you are incorrectly interpreting this data: /run/*/ is a tmpfs; not actual space. Then none in the file system column indicates this is not an actual hard disk. You need to analyse ...


2

While it would be impossible to give a fixed percentage of space you should keep empty, following points may help you to find a range. Also note that most factors depend upon the net condition of drive, rather than the partitions. Fragmentation Linux Fragments very less, so this should be a very vague issue. Performance. Again, there would be very less an ...


2

From a strict system point of view, it is exactly the same ... provided you correctly configure your partitions. Correctly configured partitions are perfectly safe to use and you will never inadvertantly erase date in one partition while working on another one - be they under same OS or not. If you configure them by hand hacking the Master Boot Record with ...


1

It would statistically be less safe to install onto two separate drives. If one drive fails you lose half of your data. Conversely, installing both OSs to one drive and keeping the (hypothetical?) second drive as a backup drive would give you a form of redundancy should one drive fail. As far as your system is concerned, it doesn't matter if you partition ...


1

If you have two hard drives, then installing Windows on one and Ubuntu (or any other OS) on the other is the most convenient. most modern Windows PC's come with three partitions already installed - a recovery partition, the "System Reserved" partition, and finally your primary Windows partition. If only 3 Primary partitions are defined, create an extended ...


1

When starting the live session, choose "try Ubuntu". Then open GParted via Dash. GParted is a way better partitioning program than the one in the installer. It will give you great visual display and if something doesn't work, it will give you useful information about what doesn't work. Please also notice that (if you have an HDD, so if you have an SSD, ...


1

To my knowledge, there are no files in Ubuntu which store or are dependent on the physical characteristics of the hard drive. All the information about the partitions is stored in the MBR and other data structures, which are outside of any filesystems (doing otherwise would create a chicken-and-egg problem, right? :)). The only file which comes to mind is ...


1

This is where things start to become a matter of personal preference and recommendation. Unless you have special purpose for a dual boot system, I found switching back and forth tedious. But that is a matter of style and organisation. I use Virtualbox for those Windows only applications that don't cut Wine and avoid the reboot interruption. The Linux ...


1

Sometimes I look at this notice from time to time when installing Ubuntu on different PC devices, just to be sure in case I forgot something. :) I think this is plenty enough about partitioning.


1

The problem is that you selected to use LVM (Logical Volume Management) when you installed Ubuntu. It provides to functionality to easily resize your Ubuntu partitions. THEORETICALLY! I tried that too on my first install and I found it not so easy. Well, first of all it creates one large partition with all the space you gave to Ubuntu. Inside this ...


1

Okay so I tried and got the same problem. You can get round it by using a IDE controller based HDD rather than a SATA ( which is default ) Edit your VM -> Settings -> Storage, then add a HDD to the IDE controller and delete the SATA controller. Reboot the it should work okay.


1

It actually doesn't matter. As long as you don't need to move Ubuntu or Windows, you're fine. Just add it where you have free space. :)


1

You can also use gdisk. In my case, it was able to convert a disk with existing partitions and data from MBR to GPT, keeping everything intact. However, YMMV. You can find more information about it on the ArchLinux forums. The process looks something like this: $ sudo gdisk /dev/sda GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 0.8.5 Partition table scan: MBR: MBR only ...



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