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If you don’t create a separate home partition while installing Ubuntu, you don’t have to reinstall Ubuntu from scratch. To migrate to a separate home partition after installation, you’ll have to create a new partition (which may require resizing your existing partitions), copy the files from your existing home directory to that partition, and tell Ubuntu to ...


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Nope, you don't have to create a partition for every user, instead you just have to move your old /home to your external HDD. By default /home is the place for all user files unless "root" though your user files normally will sit here. For case of permissions by default users can see other files without the ability of changing or modification, if you also ...


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First, /dev/sda and /dev/sdb are disks, not partitions. (In the Windows world, the term disk is sometimes applied to partitions, but the terms mean different things. A disk is a physical device, such as a disk that's built into a computer or an external disk. A partition is a subdivision of a disk as described in a partition table, which is a simple data ...


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Simple: There is none ;-) Dual-Booting just means that you will on bootup (after powerbutton is prssed and BIOS showed POST messages) be NOT greeted by thw Operating System as you have two installed. Instead you will be given the option to chose which one to start (Actually you can even dual-boot without that chosing-screen but let's ignore that for a ...


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Have you tryed to boot from USB and enter the terminal, and type this in: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get -y install boot-repair && boot-repair and it might work fine this way. more info at: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair


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If you don't mind to reinstall, I propose to reinstall instead of dealing with Gparted and all those partitions. Boot into Ubuntu Installation media. This can be either CD or USB stick. Start the installation. Proceed to Step 4 and choose "Something else": You will see your disk as /dev/sda Click "New Partition Table..." You will see that you have free ...


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What you are seeing is a little misleading, because most of those lines aren't real partitions. The line with filesystem udev is a virtual filesystem that does not exist on disk, and just represents some data in memory. Lines with filesystem tmpfs are virtual filesystems that exist only in memory, or swapped to the existing swap partition. They are not ...


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In principle (without actually seeing your partition layout) you should be able to simply extend the Ubuntu partition using the unallocated space. This process ought to be perfectly safe. However, in real life, nothing is guaranteed. Why not use disk imaging software (e.g. Macrium Reflect Free Edition for Windows, Clonezilla for Linux) to make a backup of ...


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Have you tried using the dd command? It's a low level disk command, which means it can be very dangerous if you type incorrectly, so proceed with caution! You will need an Ubuntu live CD or USB to boot from, or an Ubuntu installation on another disk, and you need to know the device name for your SSD, eg /dev/sda. It's really important that you get the ...


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First of all you need to boot from Ubuntu LiveCD to be able to move Ubuntu partitions. You see that now they are locked with "key" sign. After that you will be able to move all partitions. But do not mount them in Nautilus, otherwise they will be locked again. But you can unmount partitions using right-click in Gparted. But you may have trouble with ...


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One possible cause may be incorrect partition alignment. Proper partition alignment is essential for optimal performance and longevity. This is due to the block nature of every I/O operation on the hardware level as well as file system level. The key to alignment is partitioning to (at least) the given block size, which depends on the used ...


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Firstly, you can not work with mounted partitions. Since you are trying to modify the partition on which Ubuntu is installed, you can't do this from your installed OS as you cant unmount the partition. So what you have to do is: Create a live USB/CD and mood into Ubuntu Live In Gparted you start from the live environment, unmount the partition. If the ...


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You can partition and format a drive if you have booted a system with a Clonezilla Live CD/DVD by obtaining a command line prompt, which is one of the menu options you will see after booting from the CD or DVD. Then use fdisk to partition the drive and mkfs.ext3 to format the drive. E.g., if the drive you wish to partition and format is identified by ...


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I will try to answer your question. Go to www.ubuntu.com and download the distribution of your choice. Save it to your computer. Now, Burn this download to a DVD. Put the DVD in to cd/dvd slot and restart your computer. You have just created a live dvd. I think what is happening is you cannot partition when you are using the operating system. A live dvd ...


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Do a sudo chown $USER:$USER <your_problem_folder> where <your_problem_folder> is the folder with which you have trouble.



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