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Long long time ago... ... There was a time when people used to install Linux and configure it by hand for their specific needs. Some of this is true even today for servers. The choices you see in gparted are some of the popular ones for those who had very different needs as compared with the average desktop users, the intended audience for Ubuntu desktop. ...


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Generic advantages of having multiple partitions: You can use different disks/LUNs and have better performance. This can increase the performance of the databases as you can have the transaction log on a storage and the data files on another. Similar for disk I/O intensive web applications. You can use different mount options (that increase the security or ...


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Keep using Unbuntu. If you absolutely need to run a windows program, don't mess around with partitioning, just download VirtualBox, install Windows in that and voilà, not only can have your cake, you can eat it too.


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przemo's answer, imo, most closely hits the practical points. Here are some additional practical considerations: Enterprise environments typically use separate partitions for at lease / , /home , /opt , /var , /boot , and additional filesystems (1 per application or application team) under /opt. This is primarily to avoid running the system out of space ...


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If something goes really wrong during update or major version upgrade, having /home on a different partition allows you to boot from CD and then wipe completely and reinstall the operating system without losing your data. Also, this makes multiple boot with various Linux distributions possible, some people like to evaluate these side by side.


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Most of the time, when you start the Ubuntu installation, it will detect Windows partitions and guide you through making space for Ubuntu. If it doesn't, you have to manually partition, which isn't hard at all for someone like me, but I use Gentoo, so that's different. Anyways, if the Ubuntu installer cannot detect windows paritions, you will have to click ...


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For desktop? No difference. For server? Space management and backup. If your system have many users you can make additional partition for /home/, then users will not exeed that space and root (/) will not be affected. You can also mount NFS, SMB or partition on other physical disks on those folders. For example : /dev/sda1 /boot (1GB) /dev/sda2 / ...


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Have you looked to see what the Kernel is saying about the device. Plug the device into your computer and run the command dmesg. May shed some light on the situation. You should see references to sdx at the end of the output. Edit to reflect OP's comment below... Fire up a terminal. Stick the card in and then run dmesg look at the last few lines of output ...


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If you need absolutely to do it from the liveusb then choose something else then select that large partition as the root partition / and use the same username and password and it should just save your home folder and documents, but it will not retain packages in any way reliably.


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you have 2 options if you don't want lose your previous data or OS. You need know that the maximum number of primary partitions on a disk is 4. So, this is what I would do : Backup contents of DATA partition In Ubuntu installer select Custom partitioning Erase DATA Partition Create an extended partiotion and inside of the extended partition I would ...


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This is from XDA Developers For GRUB 1.97 - 1.99 & 2.00 + To make it easy, install GRUB Customizer Type these into terminal emulator : Code: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-customizer Open GRUB customizer, make a new GRUB entry. Open 'Sources' tab, type these : Code: set ...



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