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To install Ubuntu on GPT drive and UEFI there is must be "EFI boot partition". The other partitions like "/home", "/boot" are optional. For me optimal are the following partitioning: EFI boot partition swap / (root) /home and that's all)


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Short answer: What Timur Fayzrakhmanov wrote is right, replace the /boot-partition with an EFI partition. What I know or found out: For booting UEFI you need a FAT32 EFI partition, one for each drive is sufficient and can handle several operating systems (this depends mostly on your UEFI firmware). For booting Linux in legacy mode on a GPT drive you ...


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Are you actually using Windows cmd to try & run linux commands? And Windows disk management to see what's going on? That's not (ever) going to work - Windows is deliberately blind to other OS's, to discourage you from tinkering, and does not have the tools to do this. So the answer to your question is perhaps that there's nothing wrong at all... If you ...


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What you're showing is the windows disk manager which doesn't recognize EXT3/EXT4 partitions. If you did install Ubuntu (and it looks like it from your screenshot), just reboot from your hard disk and you should see a menu showing you how to boot into Windows or how to boot into Ubuntu. If you don't see such a menu, boot from the USB again, press ...


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$HOME is your home-directory, by default /home/[your username]. It is usually available as an environmental-variable. Open a shell and enter echo $HOME and you will see it's absolute path. However, I would not recommend fiddling around there as not all programs use those variables. I'd just create symlinks to the folders in your shared partition, ie: ...


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It sounds like you didn't preserve the correct ownerships/permissions when you copied the files. You can check the most important file attributes by logging in to the TTY and using ls -ld $HOME/{,.ICEauthority,.Xauthority} If necessary, you can change the ownership back recursively using sudo chown -R $USER:$USER $HOME If you continue to experience ...


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Had problems with gparted running from the OS (ie not started from a "live" boot disk). Assuming you want to assign the whole drive to one ext4 partition. Note: assuming to make a whole disk ext4 will destroy any existing data on that drive! Try the manual method, do lsblk to visually determine where you USB drive is, ie the letter X in /dev/sdX, ...


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What I would do is to try and format the HDD launching Ubuntu from a live CD/USB and run Gparted (should be, but if not available in the live environment just install it sudo apt-get install gparted): Once it is there make sure the disk is not mounted (otherwise can't format it) and select the hdd Toggle Device/Create partition table and create a new ...


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Yes, it is possible to change partitions. You should use Gparted software for this purpose. No, it is not necessary to make partitions, as system installer has already made them for you. See the links:http://www.howtogeek.com/114503/how-to-resize-your-ubuntu-partitions/ https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HowtoPartition


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By far the best way to dual boot (or triple or quadruple boot) a computer is to follow this sequence: (1) download and burn to CD a standalone version of gparted. (2) Use that to partition your disk as desired, say 75 GB for Windows, 75 GB for Linux, 75 GB for another version of Linux, and 75 GB for pure data to be read/written by both Win 7 and Linux. ...


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The utility that you want to use is fdisk however you should use it with sudo in orded to have permission to do such administrative task. You can use sudo fdisk -l or even more specific sudo fdisk - l dev/sda to take a look on the current state of your hdd( size, partitions,free space,etc). Now for creating a new parttion.Use sudo fdisk dev/sda(assuming ...



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