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18

One nice Gnome application is baobab sudo apt-get install baobab apt-cache show baobab Description-en: GNOME disk usage analyzer Disk Usage Analyzer is a graphical, menu-driven application to analyse disk usage in a GNOME environment. It can easily scan either the whole filesystem tree, or a specific user-requested directory branch (local or remote). ...


12

ncdu If you use the command line, you could use ncdu. It uses a command-line GUI (ncurses). Installation sudo apt-get install ncdu Description From its webpage: [...] ncdu: A disk usage analyzer with an ncurses interface, aimed to be run on a remote server where you don't have an entire gaphical setup, but have to do with a simple SSH ...


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Another very useful app for this is: JDiskReport Is very similar to windows SpaceSniffer and has very useful IU. You need java to use it An image to see how it works: Hope it helps !


3

Use the ducks: du -cks *|sort -rn|head -n11 This will list the top ten subdirectories and files in the current path and the space they are using, and a total. If you change the -cks to -cms it reports in MB's instead of KB's, which is probably more useful these days. You can add x to the options on du to prevent it going into other file systems, if ...


3

Your input file name contains a space character so you need to use quotes. And it has to be bs=1m instead of bs-1m: sudo dd if='/Macintosh HD/Users/nickzieno/Downloads/ubuntu-14.04.1-desktop-amd64.img' of=/dev/rdiskN bs=1m


2

When typing on a command line, a $ represents the prompt, you should not type this directly in front of sudo, nor anywhere at the beginning of that command.


2

Both Windows and Ubuntu provide graphical interfaces to manage partitions. Your question is unclear, so I will answer both potential questions: If you wish to keep both your Ubuntu OS partition and your Windows partition, then from within Ubuntu you may run the "Disks" utility. Type "Disks" into the search field of the Ubuntu menu. First select the disk, ...


2

You can either go with a swap file, like the answer to the question you link to, or you can add a swap partition. Using a swap file: Command borrowed from #Qasim in Does it make sense to create swap partitions for new installations nowadways? First switch to the root user sudo su Then run the following command mkdir /swap && cd /swap && ...


1

Your statement "1TB is the Master Boot Record" is not exactly the right way of looking at things. The dialog is indicating the partitioning method, not the location of the boot sector for your installation. There is an unfortunate ambiguity between these two meaning of master boot record (MBR). However, if this was in fact where your boot sector resides ...


1

There are a number of issues which are probably going to make this difficult for you: Traditionally, partitioning software liked to align partitions to logical tracks, so if you have 63 sectors per track, this meant aligning partitions to multiples of 63 sectors. In practice this is a small amount of data much smaller than a megabyte. However, hard ...


1

The best is just to install clean Ubuntu by choosing "Erase everything and install Ubuntu" in the installation process. It will create all the required partitions and do everything for you. But anyway, if you want to create the partitions manually just check this out (Fully explained with photos): How to use manual partitioning during installation? Or ...


1

Check out SystemRescueCd - it is a special purpose distro created for problems like yours. You will need to burn it on a CD or make a bootable USB. Then you need a second computer/laptop. Remove its hard disk, install the disk you want to recover data from and boot SystemRescueCd The Windows7 system files are probably on the system recovery partition. ...



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