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For your new HDD, first create partitions using gparted as per your wish. Then, access your HDD using sudo fdisk device_name. m command in fdisk will print help menu. npcompete@npcompete-desktop:~$ sudo fdisk /dev/sda The device presents a logical sector size that is smaller than the physical sector size. Aligning to a physical sector (or optimal I/O) ...


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It's the sync option that you show in your fstab line that's doing it. This is a common problem when using an external USB drive that uses usbmount. From /etc/usbmount/usbmount.conf: ############################################################################# # WARNING! # # ...


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It looks like you're trying to add a new primary partition in-between your current /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2. (Evidence: fdisk is saying that the acceptable ranges of end points are 499712-501757, default 501757, which is between those two partitions.) There simply isn't enough space there to do that. Instead, tell fdisk to begin the partition at 104855552 (or ...


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it deals with the entire disk and all partitions, try opening gparted while inside the live environment and resizing the windows 7 partition, then open the installer, and on the prompt where is asks if you want to erase disk and use entire disk for ubuntu, or install alongside, select "something else", go get a cup of coffee, then select the partition in the ...


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The procedure is that you first unmount any disks that may still be mounted: sudo umount /mnt/... (that is not a typo, the command is umount) Then the directory /mnt/... is empty and can be removed: sudo rmdir /mnt/... Then you can make a new mount point elsewhere: sudo mkdir /mnt/newmountpoint and mount the disk there: sudo mount -t auto ...


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Please forget everything you ever knew about boot loader installation, at least with respect to the computer under discussion. You're trying to apply BIOS assumptions to an EFI (non-BIOS) computer, and they don't apply. (Yes, I know that most people, and even manufacturers, refer to EFIs as BIOSes, but that just causes confusion. See Adam Williamson's blog ...



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