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7

No problem. That is normal when you have 2 or more operating systems. Pretty simple. Assume you have an empty disk and boot into the installation and are at the partitioning setup. create 4 partitions. Ubuntu OS needs a root of about 25Gb that can include a /home/. 25Gb is more than enough if you keep your own data outside of the system (ie. out of / and ...


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You can also use GParted for this; it will give you a nice graphical display of all partitions; you can also modify / delete / create partitions using it, if you want. You can install it using the Software Center, or by typing sudo apt-get install gparted.


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Just keep your Lubuntu installation and add the KDE packages. No need for a second installation or anything else. Be aware - all those thousand Ubuntu-distributions basically use just different default packages - thats all. Therefor if you want another desktop environment, install the related packages and that's it. The following command should be enough ...


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When you install MS Windows 10, it overwrites the Grub contents in MBR to its own. All your Windows and Linux OS files are intact and good. All you need to do here is to repair you GRUB files. I used boot-repair and it worked very well for me. If you want to fresh install everything, Install Windows 10 first and then install Ubuntu. It is possible from ...


1

While you can do this, it may be more convenient to use chroot jails to hold your multiple installations of Ubuntu. This has a downside that you will need to use the same kernel for all of your installations, but the upside is that you can use them at the same time, without needing to reboot, and don't need to partition your disks for the individual ...


1

I suggest you first install Ubuntu 14.04 and during installation make 3 partitions of 250gb ssd each disk formatted as ext4 and mount one partition as / , also format the other disk where you want to save data as /home . Then install Ubuntu 15.04 in the second partition of 250gb ssd and format it as ext4 and mount it as / and mount the other disk where you ...


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I can't really be sure which of the things I did fixed it, but it turns out that something must not have been synced. Simply rebooting the computer fixed the issue. However I did try plugging it into a different Ubuntu system and it didn't work there either. So it was definitely something I did that fixed it. For anyone else facing this issue, I would ...


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First, a clarification: Your title says you upgraded to 16.04. Does this mean that an earlier Ubuntu had been installed and was booting correctly? If so, what version? This is important mainly to establish a baseline -- if Ubuntu was installed and booting, then we know that your computer is capable of booting it correctly, which rules out certain possible ...


1

Your initial problem is caused by El Capitan's new SIP/CSR feature, and is covered in the rEFInd documentation: http://www.rodsbooks.com/refind/sip.html The issue you describe in your comment of OS X booting from the Recovery HD partition is simply a matter of how Apple has chosen to name and use its partitions. Originally, Intel-based Macs placed their ...


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I gave a similar answer a few minutes ago: Ubuntu installed, but GRUB not showing up Try out boot-repair-disk . This should fix your problem. And don't forget to save your files before you do that ;-)


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The message about the kernel using the old table, appears because you are trying to modify partitions on a disk that's in use by the system. Either boot from a LiveCD and make the changes you want on your disk or, as Rinzwind said, do a clean install. If this disk is not your system disk, you can also unmount it before you start making this kind of changes....


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For some reasons, this device is removed suddenly by kernel or USB controller in non clean way, So it leaves those /dev nodes artifact. It's a USB2 device! As I see the spec data of SanDisk Cruzer Blade.: Capacity 128 GB 64 GB 32 GB 16 GB 8 GB 4 GB Generation USB 2.0 USB 2.0 USB 2.0 USB 2.0 USB 2.0 USB 2.0 It should be a USB2 ...


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Regarding Android x86 6.0 The "EEEPC" assignment is only for ASUS EEEPCs, only use it if you have one, otherwise use android_x86, do not use generic_x86, you will get stuck at the boot animation and have to restart by using CTRL+F1 to access the terminal and issue reboot as the GUI will not get loaded. I know this because I spent several hours following bad, ...



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