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24

You cannot uninstall GRUB. As your installation stands, GRUB is necessary to boot Ubuntu (that's why it's called the bootloader). Every OS has a bootloader, and every OS needs that bootloader to boot (lots of booting :P). EDIT: As people in the comments have pointed out, there are alternatives to using GRUB. However, there is no reason to switch to one, ...


8

All the other answers start good, advising you that GRUB is usually there whether you see it or not, you probably shouldn't start taking random potshots at it, and how to restore your system to the 'hidden GRUB' you (presumably) previously enjoyed. However, they end up going wrong - in making blanket statements that GRUB is always required, when this is ...


3

To get rid of the swap partition, use GParted. Boot from the Ubuntu installation media. Select Try Ubuntu without installing. On Live desktop open GParted - delete the swap partition. Grow the Ubuntu partition, just add the unallocated space.


2

Okay. I fixed it. I'll explain for anyone that might ever come across this. On the GParted screenshot you see /dev/sdb/ extended has a key/lock infront of it. When I clicked info it said the following: Status: Busy (At least one logical partition is mounted) Alright. It was because I was booted into my Ubuntu. I burned GParted on a Live CD and booted that. ...


2

Change the boot order in your BIOS so that you can boot using your Windows Recovery Driver and then when installing Windows 10(from the recovery media) - just install it on the entire hard drive. If needed, clean the mbr using BootRec.exe /fixmbr in command prompt.


2

The partition you are trying to re-size is mounted and in use (since it's your system partition), and you cannot unmount it when it is active (also since it's your system partition). To fix it: Boot from a USB or CD with a Linux live distribution (Ubuntu for example) Now use Gparted to re-size your partition. GParted is part of the default toolset in ...


2

You have a (corrupted) Windows NTFS partition. By being closed source, Microsoft Windows makes it difficult to impossible for Linux to repair its secret disk structure. Like the error message says In the first case run chkdsk /f on Windows then reboot into Windows twice. Windows MIGHT be able to fix the disk. Ask how to boot Windows from some alternate ...


1

Launch the Disks program from the launcher. The "Volumes" section will show you all the disks in your system. Select your 3Tb HDD. In the bar at the bottom of the Volumes diagram, click the gear wheels icon to bring up the settings for that disk. Click on Edit Mount Options Turn on the Auto Mount option, and make sure the 'show in user interface' ...


1

You Can always try using fdisk Open a terminal (Ctl+ALt+t) and type sudo fdisk /dev/sdy where /dev/sdy = The device file for your flash drive. Once you get fdisk open, type p to list the partition table, Once you know where it is located you can use d # to delete it. (# = The partition; ExAMPLE d 1, d 2) w writes the partition table back to the disk and ...


1

There's nothing special about Virtualbox, it will work just like any other software would. As usual with encryption, there may be a performance hit.


1

I am not knowledgeable enough to answer weather GRUB is required or not, but if your goal is to hide GRUB completely , I have a better solution than the accepted answer. In order to achieve the fastest possible boot, instead of having GRUB wait for a timeout, it is possible for GRUB to not print the menu, unless the Shift key is held down during GRUB's ...


1

Edit: Reading the full e2fsck output, I don't believe that the file system is salvageable. You will need to perform data recovery, format the partition and re-install Ubuntu. From the e2fsck output, it looks like the file system was damaged badly. The super-block is lost but the back-up super-block is still usable. You can try to fix the issue (see later), ...


1

Reinstall Ubuntu GRUB boot loader. Boot from the Ubuntu installation media. Select Try Ubuntu without installing. On desktop open a terminal and execute : sudo mount /dev/sda2 /mnt sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/boot/efi for i in /dev /dev/pts /proc /sys /run; do sudo mount -B $i /mnt$i; done sudo chroot /mnt grub-install /dev/sda update-grub Note : sda ...


1

Macs normally come with EFI System Partitions (ESPs) of about 100 MiB, which is plenty big enough for most purposes. (I recommend making them bigger for reasons related to EFI driver bugs, but that's not an issue here.) If you're seeing just ~6 MiB of free space on your ESP (with a mount point of /boot/efi), then something is wrong. I recommend you discover ...


1

First of all : You have to install Ubuntu in the same mode as Windows is installed. When you have installed Windows in EFI mode, then do this with Ubuntu as well. Second : When there is no boot menu to be seen, disable GRUB hidden timeout. Open a terminal and execute: sudo apt-get install gksu gksudo gedit /etc/default/grub Place a # in ...



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