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3

The short answer is NO. Why would you assume such a thing ?


3

You would not notice any difference unless you ran out of RAM. At that point, there would be a monumental slowdown no matter if you used SSD or HDD. (Unless you have one of those fancy PCI-SSD things that are new from Intel.) However, if you plan on hibernating your computer, then there would be a slightly faster performance increase on the SSD. When ...


2

If you want to remove the swap partition, you should first try by commenting its entry in /etc/fstab, then reboot. As for the long boot time, it may be that one of your filesystems has been damaged. As soon as your system is up, run the appropriate fsck.* command for each of the file systems. If it reports errors, it will usually recommend how to fix them. ...


2

The best practice is related to needs. for example If I want to keep my user data and i consider those data are much valuable then i'll make my home on different partition. here in your case, since you have only one empty partition to be assigned so you have to make a choose. What's most important for you, the users data or the services data ...


2

sudo blkid -o list will list all the mounted and unmounted partitions. In addition you can use mount and df to see all mount points. mount -t type device destination_dir can be used to mount your device/partition.


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The problem is your partition table, not ext4. You'll need to backup, format, and restore to convert from MBR to GPT. Booting from GPT requires either an EFI system partition ( if your motherboard supports UEFI ) or a 1 mb bios_grub partition. After that, resizing in the future is done easily with gparted.


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If your boot partition is out of space it is most likely because there are too many old kernel images. You can safely uninstall old kernels that you don't need/use anymore. You can find the kernel version you are using with: uname -a To find all the installed kernels, instead: dpkg -l 'linux-image*'|grep 'ii'


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You may be able to convert one or more of your existing primary partitions from primary to logical form non-destructively using my FixParts (fixparts, part of the gdisk package in Ubuntu) or with some third-party Windows tools (I have no specific programs to recommend, aside from the Windows version of FixParts, but I hear that some Windows tools can do ...


1

The logical sector size being smaller than the physical sector size is normal for most modern disks. This is simply how Advanced Format disks are most often implemented. Some external disks use the same (4096-byte) sector size for both physical and logical sectors, and I've heard that some high-end internal disks now do the same, but most disks these days ...


1

If you used dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/sdb (orsdc or sdd or ...) and our internal HDD was larger then the amount of data stored on your external drive, you've lost everything on the external hard drive. (Depending on the size of the internal HDD and the amount of data that the external HDD contained, your chances of recovery vary from 0% to an unknown %...) ...


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From Terminal run sudo blkid Then cat /etc/fstab Double check that the fstab entry for swap partition matches all entries in the blkid Your fstab entry should look something like this=> UUID=your/UUID/here none swap sw 0 0


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It is a very common installation type. Just choose manual disk partitioning, when install. Create / partition on your SSD and /home on you HDD. Do not forget to set mount points correctly.



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