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Since the automatic ways aren't working, I tried googling for "manually add windows to grub" and found this. The linked answer suggests the following: The first step is to edit /etc/grub.d/40_custom (using SUDO) and add the following lines to the bottom of the file: menuentry ‘Windows 7′ { set root='(hd0,msdos2)’ chainloader +1 } Then running sudo ...


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Safety is relative, not absolute; thus, there is no correct "yes/no" answer to your question. Many people use the NTFS-3g driver that Ubuntu provides for accessing NTFS volumes without problems; however, that driver is a third-party reverse-engineered implementation, and problem reports (including reports of data loss) do occasionally crop up. Furthermore, ...


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Wubi? I'm pretty sure that wasn't supported for 14.04...do you mean the 'Install Ubuntu alongside Windows' option? However, Helio is right, you can't really modify a partition size once it's made. So, you need to: Backup everything (Windows and Ubuntu) using the backup tools (search 'Backup' in the Dash and Start Screen/Menu) to some large storage that ...


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Yes, it's definitely possible and the Ubuntu installer allows it when choosing the option "something else". Just plan the partition layout of both drives accordingly. You can create the partitions beforehand with GParted, if you feel more comfortable with that tool. In my personal experience, the Windows installer doesn't like some partitioning schemes ...


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You don't need to run anything from the command line as gparted takes care of this all for you. Simply resize the partition in gparted. You will first need to move sda11 over so that the free space follows sda10 before you can grow it.


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Without more details about your system, I really can't help you with what to remove. Plus, they're your files and thus you'd have to make the final decision about what to do with the space anyways (deleting files, etc.) What I can do, however, is show you a quick way to get a graphical breakdown of all of your files and the space they're taking. Open ...


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Test this: Open a terminal by hitting Ctrl+Alt+T. Run the following commands: sudo -i apt-get autoremove apt-get clean apt-get install --reinstall deborphan aptitude deborphan aptitude --purge remove `deborphan` deborphan –-libdevel aptitude --purge remove `deborphan --libdevel` dpkg --purge `COLUMNS=300 dpkg -l | egrep "^rc" | cut -d' ' -f3` ...


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Yes it is safe unless Windows is not in hibernated state, Ubuntu supports all major formats including windows native format, NTFS and FAT. Although Ubuntu by default uses ext filesystem like ext4 ext3 or ext2. You cannot browse Ubuntu files directly from Windows unless you use some third party software like Paragon since Windows doesn't support ext formats. ...



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