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In order to interactively ask questions during package installation you should use debconf. To dynamically create and manage configuration files (and files in /etc/init.d/ are considered configuration files) ucf can be used. A tutorial, on how to use debconf, may be found here: http://www.fifi.org/doc/debconf-doc/tutorial.html Minimal example debconf ...


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There is no particular standard you must follow with it. README and INSTALL are intended to be separate things, though. Generally, README is content describing what the package is, and INSTALL is describing how to install it. If you use GNU autotools, it follows the scheme of having a README and INSTALL file. If you have source on GitHub, it expects a ...


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@Thomas Vander Stichele I have come up with a workaround that uses the generated temporary file as a patch: https://www.theo-andreou.org/?p=1112#toc-apply-patches-for-policy-compliance


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The changelog is parsed to get the version, so you might want to update it: dch -i Change the new version you get to 3.4.1. That's also used to pick the source tarball, if you have one.


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There are tons of linux software install systems, so narrowing it down the two you might want to most look at are the .deb packages and source packages. For Ubuntu's .deb format see http://packaging.ubuntu.com/html/packaging-new-software.html That set of instructions depends on the traditional source distribution, a real under taking all truth be told. ...


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There is no "book" on Debian Packaging or Ubuntu Packaging that follows all the packaging policies for both, that is up to date, as there are changes frequently enough that you have to read the policies and the guides after they're updated. There's only the guides for Ubuntu or Debian. I had been looking for books for some time, but in fact there were none ...



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