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Just to toot my own horn, I have creating a solution for this exact circumstance. You can have a debian archive downloaded, unpacked, built, and reinstalled with 3 simple commands. It is a shell script called debtool and is available on GitHub via the aforementioned link. As mentioned on the GitHub page, the script requires apt, dpkg, and fakeroot. It also ...


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The packaging (ie debuild) is not the hard part here: building the application is. There are many ways to build i386 binaries on a 64bits system Using a 32bits virtual machine Installing one via virtualbox is straightforward. This is by far the easiest but it will take a significant amount of disk space and you will need to setup the entire system from ...


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So I finally got this working. debconf would always fail when getting the first question in my postinst if debconf already had the value. I finally had the (obvious) idea to check out the postinst and config files of other packages on my system and this is the trick: In your config . /usr/share/debconf/confmodule db_input high mypkg/mysql_root_pw || true ...


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I assume that your target program is a c/c++ or similar language. You can include all files in one binary packages. But still the best to separate development files in another one. *-dev (not -devel) should include only headers, statics libs, shared libs and even binary tools if these tools only used for development. You can declare multiple binaries ...


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For dependency information, you can see /var/lib/dpkg/status, which basically lists the contents of debian/control (with some additional information about the package itself) for each installed package. Additionally, you can look into /var/lib/dpkg/info to see the files installed, pre/post (un)installation scripts (if any), and configuration files (if any) ...


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Open the .deb file in file roller or whatever archiver you have on your system. Then go to the debian folder. In there, you will find the file control which contains the metadata.


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The command apt-get source pulseaudio will download the current source package files and extract them automatically for you. You will find the rules file in the debian directory inside the newly created source directory named after the package, here is how that looks on my installation: livewire@za20:~/Downloads$ apt-get source pulseaudio Reading package ...


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Actually, Github provides a way to export zip source archive, check right side of repository home: https://github.com/manojgudi/sandhi/archive/master.zip Another way is to make it yourself from git clone, using CMake & Make: mkdir build cd build cmake .. make dist Reference: CMake and “make dist”


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You should follow these steps, may work for you. 1) .deb file install in root path only so root path command: sudo su 2) then find the your your .deb file in which folder 3) using ls command show the particular folder files. 4) then find your .deb package file. 5) deb package command as dpkg -i ./your_file_name then Enter 6) may be work for you. I am ...


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If you received an email with Approved or Rejected, then you've uploaded your package successfully (but then it got rejected by any reason). See the rejected message: Source/binary (i.e. mixed) uploads are not allowed. Usually this is caused because you didn't created your package with debuild -S.


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Generally, <name>_<version>.orig.tar.xz or <name>_<version>.orig.tar.gz is the source archive, as released by the project. It's simply renamed to fit the vagaries of the Debian packaging system. Usually, for packaging purposes, you need to unpack <name>_<version>.orig.tar.xz in the current folder and then place the ...


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The descriptions of the options are all given in man dh_make: Single binary (s) The package will generate a single binary .deb package. It is the standard case, so if you don't know what to do, choose this. Arch-Independent (i) The package will generate a single package that is arch- independent. ...



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