Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Install g++. This can be done e.g. by sudo apt-get install g++ Not sure whether you really need a particular version. In most cases system default should be ok for it.


1

You need to install g++ or some similarly named package to compile c++ code.


0

Try these commands on terminal, sudo apt-get purge mumble-server:i386 sudo apt-get install mumble


1

You are searching for a directory, not a specific file/binary, so any package can install files inside a directory: ➜ ~ dpkg -L dpkg | grep '/var/lib/dpkg' /var/lib/dpkg /var/lib/dpkg/info /var/lib/dpkg/updates /var/lib/dpkg/parts /var/lib/dpkg/alternatives ➜ ~ dpkg -L base-files | grep '/var/lib/dpkg' /var/lib/dpkg ➜ ~ As you can see, base-files ...


0

This is what I did for it to succeed in the "purge" sudo rm /var/lib/dpkg/alternatives/google-chrome I then re-installed from https://www.google.com/intl/en/chrome/browser/


0

Remove all the unconfigured packages and reinstall again if you want. sudo dpkg -P octave sudo dpkg -P octave-control sudo dpkg -P octave-general sudo dpkg -P octave-miscellaneous sudo dpkg -P octave-struct sudo dpkg -P octave-optim sudo dpkg -P octave-specfun sudo dpkg -P octave-signal You have to resolve your host also.


1

The .run file is a binary that installs packages outside of the package manager. apt-get wouldn't be able to remove them since it never installed them (unless the .run file manually adds the repos, and then just pulls down the packages. It might do this, I've never used it.) Postgres provides their own repos for Ubuntu, and that is the preferred method to ...


1

If you already know the .deb file link, then download that deb file by, wget https://url.to.package.deb If you want to download a package then run, apt-get download <package-name> It will download all the .deb files related to the package.Finally install all the .deb files by running, sudo dpkg -i filename.deb


0

Uninstall did this, not purge. Don't feel bad, I think we've all done it at one point in time or another. Run the command again, however, this time run the command sudo apt-get purge wine without the * mark and this time, submit "n" to not uninstall at this time. Now, before you execute the command again, you should take note of the list of programs ...


1

Try to install libxerces2-java: sudo apt-get install libxerces2-java To actually find the right package, try using the powerful http://packages.ubuntu.com using the query on package content: http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?searchon=contents&keywords=xerces+jar&mode=filename&suite=saucy&arch=any


0

First, run locale and check output (in my case): LANG="it_IT.UTF-8" LC_COLLATE="it_IT.UTF-8" ... then, generate locale and finally reconfigure (replace it_IT.UTF-8 with your lang): sudo locale-gen it_IT.UTF-8 sudo dpkg-reconfigure locales this should solve the problem


0

As far as I understand, mini-dinstall requires debian .changes files when adding packages. As I only had .deb files available I found that aptly supports multiple versions as well. Another more light-weight option is freight which is a set of shell scripts for maintaining a debian repository.


0

System errors from my experience are extremely common with Linux but doesn't necessarily mean something is wrong. lol Usually the first time I get one I will just wait and it never comes back. Just go about your way, try updating and what not. If it keeps popping up then come back.


0

I had problems with enlightenment, because I didn't install the stable version. I had to use Synaptic, go through libs manually, and do apt-get clean, and apt-get autoclean, and a bunch of other things. I am not sure if you are using version 9.04 of Ubuntu, if you are not you installed an older version (Jaunty). The newest stable versions of enlightenment ...


0

To get the list of installed packages, run this: dpkg -l | grep -c ^.i dpkg -l will list all available packages and the first field consists of status codes. Specifically (from man dpkg): The first three columns of the output show the desired action, the package status, and errors, in that order. Desired action: u = Unknown i = Install h = Hold r ...


2

The output of apt-get --dry-run means, as you already figured out, that openssl 1.0.1-4ubuntu5.11 is currently installed on your system and that it will be replaced with openssl 1.0.1-4ubuntu5.12 once you run the install command. The numbers (500 and 100) in the output of apt-cache policy openssl indicate the priority of the given repository. As you can ...


0

You're right, it will install openssl 1.0.1-4ubuntu5.12 from http://archive.ubuntu.com. 500 is the priority of the source. See https://wiki.debian.org/AptPreferences


0

From the dpkg output, it looks like you need to upgrade libfontconfig1 and install libgamin0. The codeblocks packages cannot install until you do this. For the newer version of libfontconfig1, you either need to upgrade Ubuntu (12.10 or newer) or find a PPA with a newer version for 12.04. For libgamin0, it should be available to install. Make sure the ...


1

There are many packages that are just metapackages (a package that only depends on another package(s)). mysql-server is one of them. To actually remove the main MySQL Server, use sudo apt-get --purge remove mysql-server-5.5. However, that command doesn't remove the dependencies pulled in by that package. Sometimes, doing a sudo apt-get autoremove gets rid ...


0

If the installed package has priority important or required then this kind of packages are considered as most important packages. apt-cache show <package-name> The above command shows the priority of the corresponding package. avinash@avinash-Lenovo-IdeaPad-Z500:~$ apt-cache show hostname Package: hostname Essential: yes Priority: required So ...


2

$sudo apt-get -f install Have you tried this?


0

Or even use the --no-force-all option since you can also encounter packages conflicting to each other, or forcing the package to be installed even if its dependencies are not satisfied, which might break your system.


0

Hold the packages libudev0,libudev0:i386 from being upgraded. sudo apt-mark hold libudev0 sudo apt-mark hold libudev0:i386 upgrade all installed packages sudo apt-get upgrade Now the error won't appears while upgrading.


0

Install an RPM Package on Ubuntu Linux Installing software on Ubuntu usually entails using Synaptic or by using an apt-get command from the terminal. Unfortunately, there are still a number of packages out there that are only distributed in RPM format. There’s a utility called Alien that converts packages from one format to the other. This doesn’t always ...


2

You can add the --refuse-downgrade option so that no package is downgraded. So run the following command to install packages. dpkg -i --refuse-downgrade *


2

Note the first two letters of the output of dpkg -l tor which says un u: Unknown (an unknown state) n: Not- The package is not currently installed sometimes dpkg keeps such entries for references. To remove those problematic entries, run in terminal, sudo dpkg --clear-avail From man dpkg --clear-avail Erase the existing information about ...


0

After looking at the recent build failures that you got in your ppa you're depending on Qt5 packages that are not available for precise (such as libqt5widgets5). I'd suggest to add a new ppa dependency to your own ppa, the ubuntu-sdk-team stable ppa: https://launchpad.net/~ubuntu-sdk-team/+archive/ppa Go to this page to add it.


0

Based on your Qt 5.2 builds, you are installing the libraries to /opt/qt52. This isn't the standard place for libraries, and therefore the libraries are not found by shlibdeps (and also probably wouldn't run on a user's computer because there is no RPATH specified). Instead, you should install libraries to /usr/lib, which is the standard place in Precise. ...


0

It is possible that you should install "libgtk2.0-0" (meaning the 64bit version) instead of "libgtk2.0-0:i386" (32bit version). I noticed from the title that you are using a 64bit ubuntu version.


1

dpkg can extract the package name (with a bit of help). The only serious problem here is just chaining them together and that's where find steps in. apt-get remove `find -iname '*.deb' -exec dpkg --info '{}' \; | awk '/Package:/ {print $2}'` That isn't tested but it should work.


1

Try to install libgtk2.0-0 for i386, type the following command in a terminal: sudo apt-get install libgtk2.0-0:i386 Actually libgtk-x11-2.0.so.0 belongs to libgtk2.0-0: http://packages.ubuntu.com/saucy/i386/libgtk2.0-0/filelist


0

First of all, here's the obligatory warning. Unless you really know what you're doing and are an expert user, don't log in as root. There are very few good reasons for this and if you are logging in as root and trying to use a web browser, that's a pretty good indication that your use case does not fall under any of those scenarios. OK, now that the lecture ...


1

As an alternative I'd suggest doing one of the following things instead. Provide root with it's own $HOME/bin directory and have this directory added to your $PATH. In this directory you could provide your own wrapper around the wrapper, ala: #!/bin/bash /bin/google-chrome --user-data-dir /root/.config/google-chrome/ The wrapper can be called called ...


0

Chrome sandboxes its environment using zygote child processes. Without certain command-line flags you won't be able to run it as root. You need at least to specify --user-data-dir=... and disk-cache-dir=... There are MANY such command-line flags, but these two will serve to effectively relocate Chrome's data out of the /root folder. What's important to ...


0

So, after more googling and really carefully reading through the error messages again it seems that dpkg needed to be reinstalled. sudo apt-get install --reinstall dpkg What tipped off that this was the problem (if anyone searches and sees this) is that update-alternatives: not found was in the error message. As soon as dpkg was reinstalled, the other ...


1

First try to see all the available vlc versions on your repositories and PPA's by running the below command, apt-cache search vlc The output of the above command for mine would be like this, avinash@avinash-Lenovo-IdeaPad-Z500:~$ apt-cache policy vlcvlc: Installed: 2.0.8+git20140211+r49186+13+8~ubuntu13.10.1 Candidate: 2.1.2-1~ppa1 Version table: ...


0

If you want the Latest from this repositoty https://launchpad.net/~djcj/+archive/vlc-stable sudo add-apt-repository ppa:djcj/vlc-stable sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install vlc


1

No, the version is not there. You are on 13.10 and have added the repository for 13.10, not 14.04. Replace the 14.04.1 in the version string with 13.10.1 to install the package, assuming the recipe is built for 13.10 as well as 14.04.


2

Other than those which you have already posted, there are few other commands which can be helpful. Autoclean clears out the local repository of retrieved package files. sudo apt-get autoclean Force installation/removal of packages. ☠Use with caution sudo apt-get --force-yes install <pkgname> and sudo apt-get --force-yes remove <pkgname> ...


0

If all else fails, you can manually remove the package through dpkg. Running sudo dpkg -P bsnes should purge bsnes.


0

The answer given by @Gilles is very useful (actually, the answer was improved over time). Furthermore, I have a tip for the ones that don't want to install any auxiliary package (like the apt-file): Go to http://packages.ubuntu.com/; Go to the Search package directories session; Insert your package name in the Keyword field and select Only show exact ...


0

I would not rename the nginx-* binary packages, as you'll also have to rename all their dependencies in debian/control and moreover it will overwrite standard nginx files if you install the packages you built from source (e.g the nginx service file). Instead I'd install the one you built without trying to rename them. You'll be able to use the Ubuntu ...


1

You would change the name in the control file (debain/control), on the Package line. See https://www.debian.org/doc/debian-policy/ch-controlfields.html and https://www.debian.org/doc/debian-policy/ch-controlfields.html#s-f-Package


0

Try the following command: sudo dpkg -r xsplash-clean dpkg man page explaining the -r option: -r, --remove, -P, --purge package...|-a|--pending Remove an installed package. -r or --remove remove everything except conffiles. This may avoid having to reconfigure the package if it is reinstalled later.


0

I just ran into this problem myself. I had 'libboost1.48-dev' installed, which is similar to your case, where you have 'libboost1.48-python-dev'. You want to install libboost1.48-all-dev, not libboost-all-dev. The latter is version 1.46, which is incompatible with your already installed libboost1.48-python-dev. Alternately, you can un-install ...



Top 50 recent answers are included