Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

From man apt-get: autoremove autoremove is used to remove packages that were automatically installed to satisfy dependencies for other packages and are now no longer needed. So, Don't worry, It is safe to auto-remove packages by following command: sudo apt-get autoremove


0

Before anything, try sudo ldconfig Just to get that out of the way so we know it's not that. Then, try these commands, if you normally use sudo su then do not execute that command and do type sudo before every other command listed. If you normally typed sudo apt-get -f install, then execute these commands as listed. sudo su apt-get update apt-get ...


0

Problem is that gmsh having dependencies those having their own dependencies. So include the not going to be installed package to the main installation list. sudo apt-get install gmsh libmed1


0

Download the deb file for spotify and convert it to a tar.gz archive using: alien --to-tgz spotify*.deb Uncompress and untar the archive: tar xzf spotify*.tgz Copy opt/spotify folder to original location (/opt/spotify).


0

You dont have to do anything with sources.list first do apt-cache search ruby1.8 it will list all the packages. note the name of desired package you want to install and then just do sudo install with that package name.


0

Assuming such constraints were enforces by the upgrade manager, there's a good chance that you'll have broken dependencies and will have to hold back other packages to avoid the broken dependencies. If any of those other packages are critical/core packages, the upgrade manager will refuse to continue. In the case of MySQL, this might be less likely based on ...


0

Try these terminal commands: sudo rm /var/lib/apt/lists/* -vf sudo apt-get update


-1

Regarding consequences, you can expect breakages if this causes some dependencies to be unfulfilled. And bad ones for core software like libc6. It might render your system unusable. Make sure dependencies are satisfied. Use apt-cache depends and apt-cache rdepends.


-1

For the record, the "package tree" your refer to are typically called repositories (repos). If it is from Launchpad, it is called a PPA. If you install an older version of a package manually (download a .deb file and install it with sudo dpkg -i), then the high-level package managers (apt-get, aptitude, Synaptic, the system update manager, etc.) will prompt ...


1

No difference really compared to the packages you install from various repositories. You can list such packages from Synaptic by selecting Origin -> Local.


0

you need to force overwriting the packages this problem comes with repositories sudo dpkg -i --force-overwrite <filename> and then run dpkg sudo apt-get -f install see this for more help on dpkg and this for more help on this error


0

You probably removed python debian package run these commands to reinstall python-debian and after that install update-notifier package. sudo apt-get remove update-notifier-common sudo apt-get autoremove sudo apt-get --reinstall install python-debian sudo apt-get install update-notifier


0

In the case of a .deb package, do a sudo dpkg -r name Here, the name is not the main package name but rather the application name. For example, if you installed viber, sudo dpkg -i viber.deb To cleanly remove it, do a, sudo dpkg -r viber Depending on how you installed the packages, the clean removal can be done likewise. For APT packages, the above ...


0

Better keep track of extra dependency packages installed while you are installing one. The following extra packages will be installed: libgssglue1 libnfsidmap2 libtirpc1 nfs-common rpcbind If you remove original package only, the dependency package may remain. So you have to manually remove each one using apt-get purge .


0

Just use apt-get to install something. My first recommendation is to install Synaptic (sudo apt-get install synaptic) and just use Synaptic instead of Ubuntu Software Center (USC). You can do anything USC can do with Synaptic. You don't have to use Terminal anymore if you have Synaptic. You can configure your PPA in Synaptic plus so many features USC doesn't ...


0

that is because both you are running it without sudo, and the previous package operation failed and has thus not released its hold on the installation directory. Reboot and run "sudo apt-get -f install"


0

it sounds like you have a bunch of unsolved dependencies. Run: sudo apt-get -f install


0

Thanks a lot Wilf to answer your question. But someone else gave me the answer on the R mailing list, running the following commands : sudo add-apt-repository ppa:marutter/rrutter sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install r-base r-base-dev helped me solve my problem !


1

From man synaptic: OPTIONS Synaptic accepts all of the standard Gtk+ toolkit command line options as well as the following: -f, --filter-file=filename specify an alternative filter settings file -i, --initial-filter=int apply the filter with number int at startup -o, --option=option ...


0

Depends: libtiff4 but it is not installable This issue appears to be due to the libtiff4 package not being available for Ubuntu 14.04 So a possible workaround would to download the version for Saucy, the last supported release, from here or here: For i386: wget http://mirrors.kernel.org/ubuntu/pool/universe/t/tiff3/libtiff4_3.9.7-2ubuntu1_i386.deb dpkg ...


3

Yes, PPA's can be add to /etc/apt/source.list, similar way to deb repositories deb http://ppa.launchpad.net/<ppa-name>/ppa/ubuntu <release-code-name> main deb-src http://ppa.launchpad.net/<ppa-name>/ppa/ubuntu <release-code-name> main Example for WineHq: Thought just matter of keeping thing somehow easily managed, leaving ...


1

You can also find out the package path from the package name: $dpkg -L <package name> e.g. $dpkg -L zip


0

Select console application from your prompt and then when it appears run echo -e "\ndeb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ trusty universe\ndeb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ trusty multiverse\n" >> /etc/apt/sources.list to set apt-get sources and then apt-get update apt-get install vlc


5

Use dpkg -S, as in dpkg -S /path/to/file. For sorting list in column, Follow: dpkg -S /usr/share | tr " ," "\n" | sort


0

apt-mark showmanual man pages state: will print a list of manually installed packages So, it should just give a list of explicitly installed packages without all of the dependencies included due to these packages being installed.


0

libdconf0 now not available. Available one is libdconf1 sudo apt-get install libdconf1


0

The system tries to install Spotify. Create a directory /opt/spotify/spotify-client, owned by root, with permissions 755 and try again. If you accentally also deleted /opt/spotify, do the same for that directory. Then repeat sudo apt-get -f install, and sudo apt-get remove spotify.


0

In my case this worked: sudo dpkg -P package_name (not deb name)


0

Use aptitude instead of apt, sudo apt-get install aptitude sudo aptitude -f install


0

Try Code: sudo apt-get update to update your package list. Then Code: sudo apt-get autoclean to clean up any partial packages. Then Code: sudo apt-get clean to clean up the apt cache. Code: sudo apt-get autoremove will clean up any unneeded dependencies. If while doing this you can identify the broken package this code will very forcefully remove ...


2

I guess the following would work to install the package to a directory: ~/local/ Download the package as package.deb using : apt-get download <package_name> Then run dpkg --install package.deb --instdir=~/local


2

As mentioned in one of the comments, use apt-get just to download, then dpkg -i to install. mkdir $HOME/.local apt-get download <package_name> dpkg -i --force-not-root --root=$HOME/.local <package_name.deb> Note: what's nice is that apt-get automatically picks the package that fits your Ubuntu distribution and your architecture.


0

Type in the Terminal sudo apt-get install build-essential and then press key TAB instead of pressing ENTER.


0

Okay, I've tried this method and it works. :-) For the next person who stumbles on this: Step 1: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:(name of PPA) Step 2: sudo dpkg --add-architecture amd64 Step 3: sudo apt-get update Step 4: apt-cache policy (package name) (Just to make sure it's there.) Step 5: sudo apt-get source -b (package name) Step 6: sudo dpkg ...


2

Simply try following command ( to get disk space freed by purge): echo -n | sudo apt-get purge <package> | grep "disk space will be freed" or echo -n | sudo apt-get purge --auto-remove <package> | grep "disk space will be freed" where replace <package> with your package-name ( example: gimp) This will not purge package with ...


4

Simplest and bug free way to get the space used by a program and all its dependencies is to use apt itself. Note dependencies that are not used by another program, but installed with a package, is not considered as they are not removed. Simply sudo apt-get --assume-no autoremove PACKAGENAME or apt-space-used-by() { sudo apt-get --assume-no autoremove ...


1

This cannot easily be done in any automated way, especially if you have any PPAs that are giving 404. (which most people do) Also, depending on what packages you have installed, a completely automated downgrade could really screw up your system. Follow these steps to manually find and downgrade packages. Install Synaptic if you don't already have it Open ...


1

APT refers to these packages as "obsolete". Evidently there is no direct way to list these, but you could do: aptitude search '~o' Or alternatively: apt-show-versions | grep 'No available version' Source: How do I get a list of obsolete packages? If you want a GUI tool you can do this with Synaptic by using the built-in "local or obsolete" filter.


0

I believe that you want to use ppa-purge sudo ppa-purge ppa:name-of-ppa/to-be-purged man ppa-purge indicates that this will "automatically down‐grading all packages in a given PPA back to the ubuntu versions."


2

apt-cache show packagename lists, among other things, the installed size of a package and the dependencies of a package. There's also apt-cache rdepends packagename to list the packages that use that package. You might want to use the latter command and apt-cache policy packagename to determine if a reverse-depdendency is installed.


1

sudo dpkg --remove --force-remove-reinstreq --dry-run libgfortran3:amd64 That's just a dry-run. I'm not sure what removing libgfortran3 will take with it but run that and see. Assuming it's not going to gobble the whole system, run it again without the --dry-run and then you can sudo apt-get install ... the packages you need back.


0

If you want to fix this through GUI, you can use synaptic. Synaptic is an excellent package management tool that used to be included in older versions of ubuntu. To install it: sudo apt-get install synaptic click on fix broken packages.


1

first you need to uninstall the present libjansson4. sudo apt-get remove libjansson4 If you are having a problem removing it, run: sudo dpkg -r libjansson4 If it is succeeded or not, then run: gksudo gedit /var/lib/dpkg/status In the resulting Gedit , remove the whole section starts with Package : libjansson4 Then save the file and close. Then ...


0

Apt and Dpkg are not going anywhere, they are here to stay: all of the applications you listed use them on the back end. You should think of GUI and shell interfaces as related but independent - often a GUI uses the shell commands as a backend - for example, we added a Landscape control panel in 12.04, but left landscape-config unchanged.


1

Cockpit is in development, and it is a Red Hat sponsored tool - it is not clear today it will manage Ubuntu. Cockpit's documentation is sparse at the moment as it is undergoing rapid development - you can read the source, but that's about it for now. Options to manage multiple Ubuntu servers are tracked in this question Options for managing multiple Ubuntu ...


1

Run : sudo dpkg -r libc6 sudo rm /var/cache/apt/archives/libc6_2.15-0ubuntu10.5_i386.deb If above are successful or not, run : gksudo gedit /var/lib/dpkg/status In the resulting gedit, remove the whole section starts with : Package : libc6 then run an update. If this not resolves, You need to format.


-1

/home/admin/.config/menus/applications-merged . replace admin with the pc name that was provided by at the time of installation


2

in 14.04 LTS 64Bit sudo apt-get remove libkde3support4 k3b-data ntrack-module-libnl-0 libkrosscore4 libgpgme++2 libqapt2 oxygen-icon-theme libktexteditor4 libtaskmanager4abi5 kdenetwork-filesharing libkblog4 libchm1 plasma-widgets-addons libkimap4 plasma-netbook libkdeui5 libkdeclarative5 ttf-oxygen-font-family gtk3-engines-oxygen user-manager gpgsm ...



Top 50 recent answers are included