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272

To get a list of packages installed locally do this in your terminal: dpkg --get-selections | grep -v deinstall To save that list to a text file called packages on your desktop do this in your terminal: dpkg --get-selections | grep -v deinstall > ~/Desktop/packages (you don't need to run this as the superuser, so no sudo necessary here)


190

APT is a package management system for Debian and other Linux distributions based on it, such as Ubuntu. For the most part,APT is easy to use for installing, removing, and updating packages. In rare instances, often when you are mixing in third-party dependencies, there is a chance that apt-get may end up giving you an error telling you that a package ...


167

According to an article on debian-administration.org, If the dependencies have changed on one of the packages you have installed so that a new package must be installed to perform the upgrade then that will be listed as "kept-back". That article says sudo apt-get dist-upgrade will force the installation of those newer packages. Note: dist-upgrade ...


111

You can simply check if the file /var/run/reboot-required exists or not. For example, any of these would tell you "no such file" or "file not found" if you do not need to reboot, otherwise they will show information about the file: file /var/run/reboot-required stat /var/run/reboot-required ls /var/run/reboot-required In a bash script, you can use: ...


104

Now go to Synaptic Package Manager (System > Administration > Synaptic Package Manager) Click search button and type package name. When you find package select it and go to Package (in menu) and click Lock Version. and you are done, now that package will not show in update manager and it will not be updated. There are four ways of holding back ...


103

This is actually a feature of Ubuntu. There is no problem with updating the software with its latest version, and Ubuntu developers might do it easily. And, actually, it is done in several other Linux distributions, including Arch. As you have noticed, Ubuntu software is updated only with security updates and critical bug fixes. All features are "frozen", ...


93

Programs A quick way of backing up a list of programs is to run this: dpkg --get-selections > ~/Package.list sudo cp -R /etc/apt/sources.list* ~/ sudo apt-key exportall > ~/Repo.keys It will back them up in a format that dpkg can read for after your reinstall, like this: sudo apt-key add ~/Repo.keys sudo cp -R ~/sources.list* /etc/apt/ sudo ...


89

Probably the most popular package managers are apt-get, aptitude, synaptic, and Software Center. There are others (Linux Mint has its own, and there are some designed for KDE), but these are the ones you'll run into most often. apt-get is a simple command-line tool. It's handy if you know the exact package name of what you want to install and don't want to ...


79

Create a backup of what packages are currently installed: dpkg --get-selections > list.txt Then (on another system) restore installations from that list: dpkg --clear-selections sudo dpkg --set-selections < list.txt To get rid of stale packages sudo apt-get autoremove To get installed like at backup time (i.e. to install packages set by dpkg ...


78

As far as I can see, in 10.04, the main differences between aptitude and apt-get are: aptitude adds explicit per-package flags, indicating whether a package was automatically installed to satisfy a dependency: you can manipulate those flags (aptitude markauto or aptitude unmarkauto) to change the way aptitude treats the package. apt-get keeps track of ...


77

To get just the packages which were expressly installed (not just installed as dependencies), you can run aptitude search '~i!~M' This will also include a brief description, which you may want. If not, use the option -F '%p', as mentioned by karthick87. caveat: as pointed out by gertvdijk in the comments, aptitude is not currently (as of 2013-01-11) ...


75

The package unattended-upgrades provides functionality to install security updates automatically. You could use this, but instead of configuring the automatic part you could call it manually. For this case, the following should do it: sudo unattended-upgrade This assumes that the package is installed by default, which it probably is. If not, just do: ...


74

Check out Keryx, it's an offline repository manager. How does it work? It lets you download updates and new programs (with dependencies) to your flash drive. Its interface is similar to synaptic but it works from a pendrive (it doesn't need installation). Unfortunately, the GUI needs wxwidgets, which don't come preinstalled on Ubuntu (they're ...


57

Think of it as a great river, with the people who write the software as the source of the river. They would be the upstream, futher downstream would be your distribution, and at the end of the river would be the user. Ubuntu is in the middle of the river. Upstream would be the software that Ubuntu packages and ships to users. Things like GNOME, Firefox, ...


54

Whenever you receive from the command apt-get upgrade the message The following packages have been kept back: then to upgrade one or all of the kept-back packages, without doing a distribution upgrade (this is what dist-upgrade does, if I remember correctly) is to issue the command: apt-get install <list of packages kept back> this will resolve ...


51

apt-get remove packagenamewill remove the binaries, but not the configuration or data files of the package packagename. It will also leave dependencies installed with it on installation time untouched. apt-get purge packagename, or apt-get remove --purge packagename will remove about everything regarding the package packagename, but not the dependencies ...


50

Based on the errors you pasted in the comments section of my previous answer, I have another possible solution: sudo apt-get clean cd /var/lib/apt sudo mv lists lists.old sudo mkdir -p lists/partial sudo apt-get clean sudo apt-get update This will rebuild the cache. Courtesy:http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1983220#8


50

This is a generic answer to the question about the effects of purging packages generally. For advice specific to your situation, you'll have to edit your question to include additional information--in particular, the complete and exact text of the error message you are getting. Removing packages with sudo apt-get purge ... or sudo apt-get --purge remove ... ...


42

As far as I understand your requirements, the madison option for apt-cache does what you want: madison /[ pkg(s) ] apt-cache's madison command attempts to mimic the output format and a subset of the functionality of the Debian archive management tool, madison. It displays available versions of a package in a tabular format. Unlike the original madison, ...


41

Note: All commands asked to be run must be run in the terminal, which can be opened by either Ctrl+Alt+T or searching for terminal in the dash. Is it really broken? Try running the following command and try to reinstall the software you were trying to install sudo apt-get update Pre-Perfomance Steps Backing up Back up the following files: ...


37

This is a problem that the Ubuntu Software Center team is in the progress of solving. The problem is that Ubuntu traditionally draws most of its applications from the in-development branch of Debian GNU/Linux—another free operating system—and then "freezes" a snapshot of it for inclusion in a release. This body of community-maintained software—called "the ...


37

Short version: cat /var/run/reboot-required.pkgs Explanation: Looks like there is an easy way to automatically extract the requested information. Inside .deb files there are control files for installation, including postinst (run after installation). For example, in linux-image-2.6.35-25-generic_2.6.35-25.44_amd64.deb, postinst includes my $notifier ...


37

Ubuntu used to keep the old kernels around for safety reasons, however it should be autocleaning old kernels now. The system should be auto cleaning old kernels per this bug: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/apt/+bug/923876 So you might want to ensure that your system is up to date and that you have apt (0.9.7.5ubuntu5.5) installed. If you're ...


36

Use the command: apt-cache policy <packageName> This gives you information of all available package versions. Example: alaa@aa-lu:~$ apt-cache policy vlc vlc: Installed: 2.0.8-0ubuntu0.13.04.1 Candidate: 2.0.8-0ubuntu0.13.04.1 Version table: *** 2.0.8-0ubuntu0.13.04.1 0 500 http://ae.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ ...


35

Command to list recently installed packages that were installed via any method (apt-get, Software Center et al.): cat /var/log/dpkg.log | grep "\ install\ " Example output: 2010-12-08 15:48:14 install python-testtools <none> 0.9.2-1 2010-12-08 15:48:16 install quickly-widgets <none> 10.09 2010-12-08 22:21:31 install libobasis3.3-sdk ...


35

You can use dpkg command to find out which package owns a file: dpkg -S /bin/ls You can either search with a full path or with just the filename. If you wish to search for files not yet installed on your computer, you can use the Ubuntu Packages Search


33

To list all packages intentionally installed by apt commands, run the following : ( zcat $( ls -tr /var/log/apt/history.log*.gz ) ; cat /var/log/apt/history.log ) | egrep '^(Start-Date:|Commandline:)' | grep -v aptdaemon | egrep '^Commandline:' This provides a reverse time based view, with older commands listed first: Commandline: apt-get install k3b ...


32

A quick hack A quick hack is to copy all the packages you downloaded for your install to his machine. The .deb files are stored in /var/cache/apt/archives, then in the other computer launch Synaptic and select File -> Add Package Downloaded and search the folder were you put the files and open it, accept all. NOTE: This assumes that your package ...



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