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162

APT is a package management system for Debian and other Linux distributions based on it, such as Ubuntu. For the most part,APT is easy to use for installing, removing, and updating packages. In rare instances, often when you are mixing in third-party dependencies, there is a chance that apt-get may end up giving you an error telling you that a package ...


137

According to an article on debian-administration.org, If the dependencies have changed on one of the packages you have installed so that a new package must be installed to perform the upgrade then that will be listed as "kept-back". That article says sudo apt-get dist-upgrade will force the installation of those newer packages. Note: dist-upgrade ...


103

This is actually a feature of Ubuntu. There is no problem with updating the software with its latest version, and Ubuntu developers might do it easily. And, actually, it is done in several other Linux distributions, including Arch. As you have noticed, Ubuntu software is updated only with security updates and critical bug fixes. All features are "frozen", ...


85

Probably the most popular package managers are apt-get, aptitude, synaptic, and Software Center. There are others (Linux Mint has its own, and there are some designed for KDE), but these are the ones you'll run into most often. apt-get is a simple command-line tool. It's handy if you know the exact package name of what you want to install and don't want to ...


85

Programs A quick way of backing up a list of programs is to run this: dpkg --get-selections > ~/Package.list sudo cp /etc/apt/sources.list ~/sources.list sudo apt-key exportall > ~/Repo.keys It will back them up in a format that dpkg can read for after your reinstall, like this: sudo apt-key add ~/Repo.keys sudo cp ~/sources.list ...


84

Now go to Synaptic Package Manager (System > Administration > Synaptic Package Manager) Click search button and type package name. When you find package select it and go to Package (in menu) and click Lock Version. and you are done, now that package will not show in update manager and it will not be updated. There are four ways of holding back ...


70

The package unattended-upgrades provides functionality to install security updates automatically. You could use this, but instead of configuring the automatic part you could call it manually. For this case, the following should do it: sudo unattended-upgrade This assumes that the package is installed by default, which it probably is. If not, just do: ...


68

all supported ubuntu versions To install Adobe Acrobat you will need to enable the canonical partners repository in the Software Sources tab of Update Manager Use Dash and search for Software Sources or Software & Updates in 13.04 and later. If you don't see those options in Software Sources, you can use the following command from a terminal: sudo ...


57

Think of it as a great river, with the people who write the software as the source of the river. They would be the upstream, futher downstream would be your distribution, and at the end of the river would be the user. Ubuntu is in the middle of the river. Upstream would be the software that Ubuntu packages and ships to users. Things like GNOME, Firefox, ...


43

Based on the errors you pasted in the comments section of my previous answer, I have another possible solution: sudo apt-get clean cd /var/lib/apt sudo mv lists lists.old sudo mkdir -p lists/partial sudo apt-get clean sudo apt-get update This will rebuild the cache. Courtesy:http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1983220#8


41

Whenever you receive from the command apt-get upgrade the message The following packages have been kept back: then to upgrade one or all of the kept-back packages, without doing a distribution upgrade (this is what dist-upgrade does, if I remember correctly) is to issue the command: apt-get install <list of packages kept back> this will resolve ...


38

As far as I understand your requirements, the madison option for apt-cache does what you want: madison /[ pkg(s) ] apt-cache's madison command attempts to mimic the output format and a subset of the functionality of the Debian archive management tool, madison. It displays available versions of a package in a tabular format. Unlike the original madison, ...


38

Note: All commands asked to be run must be run in the terminal, which can be opened by either Ctrl+Alt+T or searching for terminal in the dash. Is it really broken? Try running the following command and try to reinstall the software you were trying to install sudo apt-get update Pre-Perfomance Steps Backing up Back up the following files: ...


38

This is a generic answer to the question about the effects of purging packages generally. For advice specific to your situation, you'll have to edit your question to include additional information--in particular, the complete and exact text of the error message you are getting. Removing packages with sudo apt-get purge ... or sudo apt-get --purge remove ... ...


37

Ubuntu used to keep the old kernels around for safety reasons, however it should be autocleaning old kernels now. The system should be auto cleaning old kernels per this bug: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/apt/+bug/923876 So you might want to ensure that your system is up to date and that you have apt (0.9.7.5ubuntu5.5) installed. If you're ...


37

This is a problem that the Ubuntu Software Center team is in the progress of solving. The problem is that Ubuntu traditionally draws most of its applications from the in-development branch of Debian GNU/Linux—another free operating system—and then "freezes" a snapshot of it for inclusion in a release. This body of community-maintained software—called "the ...


33

Short version: cat /var/run/reboot-required.pkgs Explanation: Looks like there is an easy way to automatically extract the requested information. Inside .deb files there are control files for installation, including postinst (run after installation). For example, in linux-image-2.6.35-25-generic_2.6.35-25.44_amd64.deb, postinst includes my $notifier ...


30

Canonical (the main sponsors behind ubuntu) decided from the start (v4) that Ubuntu will be distributed on a 6 month cycle. Every 6 months, the latest/most stable software would be included in the repositories mainly from the unstable/testing branch of debian. Outside that cycle you could get the most cutting edge software by compiling software or ...


28

Command to list recently installed packages that were installed via any method (apt-get, Software Center et al.): cat /var/log/dpkg.log | grep "\ install\ " Example output: 2010-12-08 15:48:14 install python-testtools <none> 0.9.2-1 2010-12-08 15:48:16 install quickly-widgets <none> 10.09 2010-12-08 22:21:31 install libobasis3.3-sdk ...


28

You can use the command apt-get autoremove. It will remove packages that are installed as automatic dependencies, but are not depended anymore. Apt-get has a flag --auto-remove that can be used to automatically remove the automatically installed packages when removing a manually installed package: apt-get remove --auto-remove packagename Certain other ...


27

Can I use Yum I wouldn't recommend it. You probably could compile it but you wouldn't have any Ubuntu-compatible package repositories for it to handle. You can convert single RPM files into DEBs with Alien: sudo apt-get install alien alien my_package.rpm dpkg -i my_package.deb Note: It might change the filename a little more than just the extension. ...


27

A "Debian release" itself isn't one thing, there usually different releases of Debian in the wild. Debian has a branch called "unstable", or "sid", named after the kid from Toy Story who breaks his toys. Debian also has a "stable" release, which is released when it's ready. These are usually released in longer intervals. In between is a release called ...


26

Press Ctrl+Alt+F1 (to enter a virtual console), log in with with your account and install the package gnome-terminal with the command: sudo apt-get install gnome-terminal When you type passwords into a text-only virtual console, you don't see anything on the screen. That's normal. Return to Unity (or whatever other desktop environment you're currently ...


26

You can use dpkg command to find out which package owns a file: dpkg -S /bin/ls You can either search with a full path or with just the filename. If you wish to search for files not yet installed on your computer, you can use the Ubuntu Packages Search


26

You can use the following PPA: https://launchpad.net/~rwky/+archive/redis. You can install this repo running the command: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:rwky/redis then update the packages' information sudo apt-get update finally install the application sudo apt-get install redis-server


25

Find out what package installed the config file: $ dpkg -S unity-greeter.conf unity-greeter: /etc/lightdm/unity-greeter.conf As you can see, the name of the package is unity-greeter. Rename (or delete) the config file you wish to restore: sudo mv /etc/lightdm/unity-greeter.conf /etc/lightdm/unity-greeter.conf.bak Run the following command, replacing ...


25

I was having the same problem on Ubuntu 11.10, tried all of the same solutions, none of which worked for me either. I found this on another discussion board and it appears to have worked for me: If you want to remove oracle-jdk7-installer, you can simply go to /var/lib/dpkg/info/ It takes some time to load, and delete all files which starts with ...


24

If you have lots of PPAs, you may want to try a graphical "PPA Manager" to make life easier. Scroll down directly to the PPA Manager section for a recommendation. No, there is no unofficial "PPA" software center for Ubuntu. One of Ubuntu's primary goals is to be a stable and reliable desktop Linux for the masses. That is why the packages (and specific ...



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