Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

deb We are a debian based system so our files end in .deb and lots of people call those "deb installer file" or "debian installer file". And the page you refer to is Redhat; Debian/Ubuntu has its own page and even a page referring to the deb file format. And the "package format" page lists them all: Examples .apk – used by Android .appx, .appxbundle — ...


4

TL;DR: You can use reverse-depends src:$(what-source libsslcommon2). There is no libsslcommon2 source package. Instead, libsslcommon2 is one of a number of binary packages built from the qpid-cpp source package. In general, a binary package may or may not have the same name as the source package used to build it, and source packages may provide multiple ...


2

It's sudo apt-get install httrack Note the install command before the package name parameter. See the Man Page.


2

There are a number of vector drawing programs that support DXF files to varying degrees, and have commandline convert capabilities, including dia, inkscape, and even libreoffice. dia appears to support dxf input and png output e.g. dia jcsample.dxf -e jcsample.png or, with explicit output dimensions, dia jcsample.dxf -s 744x1052 -e jcsample.png ...


2

The reverse-depends software doesn't automatically detect the source package from which a given binary package is generated. The src: label is used to indicate that what follows is the name of a source package. It so happens that the name of the source package for bash is, well, bash. But for libsslcommon2, the source package is named qpid-cpp: $ ...


1

This seems to be a bug of apt. Version 1.0.1 is affected. We've built version 1.0.9.2 from source, and it behaves as expected: reports unmet dependencies and exits with non-zero status. Perhaps this is the same bug: https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=745046


1

As Suggested by Aravinda above, this is what I did: I ran sudo apt-get purge fglrx then sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade . See comments above.


1

It may not be possible in a fully general sense, but if your deb came from Debian or Ubuntu directly (i.e., not a third-party deb), then it is required to be reproducible by autobuilders which do something like the following: Start with a bare system- all Essential: yes or Priority: Required packages, plus build-essential, and any extra dependencies of ...


1

The package is trying to overwrite files which are maintained by a different package. The dpkg error indicates that the insight package is trying to overwrite a file managed by gdbserver. You can't have two packages managing the same file in the packaging system's mind, so it errors. I would suggest that you investigate the PPA and reach out to the PPA ...


1

The problem seems to be in vlc-nox, that is not removed when Ubuntu is upgraded. If you remove it at first, everything should work OK. Something like that: sudo apt-get remove vlc-nox sudo apt-get autoremove sudo apt-get update And then install vlc (3.0 worked for me): sudo add-apt-repository ppa:videolan/master-daily sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get ...


1

This will purge the broken package and conf sudo apt-get purge prey


1

One issue is that the sav-* scripts mentioned in your output seem to be missing a LSB-header. If that is some Sophos Antivirus stuff, better ask Sophos about it. If all else fails, try to add the LSB tags manually to /etc/init.d/sav-web and the other two.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible