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35

The charging thresholds are, very unfortunately, firmware and vendor specific. The Lenovo user is luckily provided with a solution outlined on ThinkWiki. It basically says that you would have to install and load the tp_smapi kernel module: sudo apt-get install tp-smapi-dkms sudo modprobe tp_smapi and write the desired charging thresholds to virtual ...


15

During the 10.10 development cycle the decision was made to drop support for i386 and i486 entirely. You can see the original specification here: https://blueprints.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+spec/foundations-m-686-compile. I believe support may have been dropped for i586 as well, although that was a bit more controversial. Importantly, this wasn't just kernel ...


10

If you would like to extend the lifetime of your battery, I would suggest no single application, but some more measures: Remove your batteries when not needed: If you do lots of desktop work without moving your laptop, remove your batteries. Usually this will save a lot of lifetime, because they are not (un)loaded. However you should remember that the ...


10

It is rather difficult in my experience to lower the Compiz memory usage. The best thing I can suggest to lower the texture quality in the OpenGL plugin, but this won't change much afaik. Another source of compiz memory increases can be memory leaks. This seems to sometimes be triggered by indicators, but can be from other sources as well (not sure of them ...


8

WOW! H264 is a high quality video codec but (as you refer), it makes "heavy" size video files. I am not sure if your question is related to a GUI or Command Line task. But, assumming that you are using "Transmaggedon" I will write this considering the options for GUI applications. In my case, I prefer the usage of "Mobile Media Converter" which works ...


8

The only thing that stands out for me in that bootchart is the (relatively) long period from ~6sec to ~11sec into the boot where the disc throughput is very low. This suggests that ureadahead is doing a lot of (slow) seeking rather than (fast) linear reads. Making ureadahead reprofile your boot may help here. Deleting the .pack files in ...


5

If you have such a low end system (For me 512 MB of RAM is still not low, but it depends also on your Motherboard and CPU) I actually recommend Xfce with Xubuntu or LXDE with Lubuntu. Both are oriented towards low end systems. I actually have a question regarding this that was very well answered by fossfreedom: Lighter in CPU/Memory Usage: Lubuntu or ...


5

The following uses the kernel's virtual memory block dump mechanism. First get the perl script: wget http://aspersa.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/iodump Then turn on block dump: echo 1 | sudo tee /proc/sys/vm/block_dump And run the following: while true; do sleep 1; sudo dmesg -c; done | perl iodump ..and press Controlc to finish, you will see something ...


5

You could at least start with iotop. It won't tell you which filesystem is being written but it will give you some processes to investigate. sudo apt-get install iotop sudo iotop It shows instantaneous disk reads and writes and the name of the command reading or writing. If you are trying to catch a process that writes infrequently, you can use the ...


3

A work around to the compiz memory leak is to : sudo kill -HUP "compiz process id" Not a great solution, but it frees up leaked memory without completely killing the process.


3

Alright, here goes: #!/bin/bash threshold=100 # Minimum amount of memory left when you should start killing, in MB browser="firefox-bin" # Change this to whatever you use, firefox is actually firefox-bin while true; do available=$(free -m | head -2 | tail -1 | awk '{print $4}') if [ "$threshold" -ge "$available" ]; then killall -q ...


2

New releases of Ubuntu(10.10 and above) won't work on anything older than i686. http://princessleia.com/journal/?p=2989


2

Killing anything to conserve memory is a bad idea, especially automatically. Make sure that you have enough swap and RAM available - of course, running something that uses 1 gig of memory on a 512MB machine is like trying to win a F1 Grand Prix while driving a Corolla. By which I mean "don't do it."


2

Did you check to see whether there is a BIOS setting on your laptop for this? My laptop had a Windows Application as well as a "Battery Life Extender" setting in the BIOS for this exact feature.


2

See if this question and relative answer can help you: Is there a copy handling progam available that can queue, pause and resume? It means to use an application other that Nautilus, that AFAIK cannot do what you ask.


2

OK, so I don't know what the particular problem here might be, but here is a very basic approach that I usually take in such a case. Forgive me if you think it is too simplistic. I usually open a terminal window and type `top` This is a terminal (ncurses) based program with a not very intuitive interface; there are more elaborate graphic alternatives, ...


2

cgroups (control groups) are used mainly by LXC (LinuX Containers) and its "memory cgroup" is for process group memory restriction. Unless you need this stuff it's better to disable this feature, since otherwise it consumes a part of RAM for its internal structures and CPU can be affected as well.


2

Memory management in Ubuntu and Linux in general is fairly optimal. Any applications that cause memory problems (eg "memory leaks") would be considered buggy. Unused RAM is utilised by the system for read-ahead cache and other optimisations. These optimisations are removed from memory if it required by the system, so there's no need to clean it either ...


2

If you have full root access to the box, you might want to look at some of the tweaks on Elliott C. Back's Post: Why My Site Is So Much Faster Than Yours. Some can be done on Non Root enabled boxes (like W3 Super Cache, which i use for my own sites), but others may need root access for (like tweaking MySQL, PHP OpCode, Apache and Kernel tweaks).


1

First I would disconnect the PC-Power supply because it can damage the Computer and I would replace with another old PC-Power supply that is completely sure it works, not a new one. Otherwise I would try to test Volts at the PC-Power supply. Second I would perform a memory test, it seems that you have to leave it a whole night, I am not sure. Third I would ...


1

Very often (almost always) this is an option in the BIOS that Windows can change remotely. It's very difficult to remote change this in Linux. My suggestion? When starting up your computer, smash the function keys, specifically F1, F2, F3, F6, F8, F10, and F12. One of these (maybe another) will put you into the bios menu. It says which key on startup, but it ...


1

I'd suggest you this simple tips: Upgrade the RAM, it will make a huge difference. Use a lighter Desktop like LXDE, i even find LXDE+xcompmgr (a basic composite manager) faster than Gnome with default Metacity. Gnome is a "hog" in these netbooks. 2.1 You can also use XFCE+Docky or Avant Window Manager to give your clients a more Unity-like feel without ...


1

So to answer the question I think you're asking, it is possible to use these two together, and doing so won't cause any ill effects on the other. I don't know if you are familiar with /dev/shm, but it's a filesystem mounted in RAM which appears to be a folder. SHM, tmpfs and zram are all slightly different implementations which lead to the same output - ...


1

Your slowness may be due to the fact that you are using Intel HD Graphics. Linux does not have very good 3D graphics support for Intel Chips. Also, in 12.04, Compiz eats a lot of memory. Use a 64 bit Ubuntu with either Gnome 3 or Cinnamon desktop for graphics effects. They use less amount of memory than compiz. Or if you want, you can use Unity-2D, faster ...


1

can the directory structure for this folder be cached in the RAM? Can the most used files be cached into the RAM as well? Yes. That is how the system normally operates; you don't have to do anything special. The kernel automatically caches recently accessed files in unused ram.


1

The operating system will already have a system cache for the files you access. However if you are working with lots of small files you'd probably be better off turning of atime with the noatime boot parameter. Each time you access a file, it triggers a write to update when a file was last accessed. Other than that or buying an SSD drive the linux kernel ...


1

With so little RAM I would install Lubuntu. I'm afraid that even Xubuntu would be too much for your system to perform reasonably well. This said, you may try both if you have the time to experiment a bit.


1

If you want to know exactly what is taking time to boot your system: Install bootchart. Create a bootchart (Some bootchart examples on Google Images to get an idea what bootchart is about). Save the image to an external media. At this point you can analyse what program is taking up time during boottime but if you want to exactly know where that 25% ...


1

I can give you an answer to "Why is it slower?". The Matlab website makes the following points: MATLAB performance is similar on Windows®, Mac OS® X, and Linux®, although differences can occur among platforms for the following reasons: MathWorks builds its products with a different compiler on each platform, and each has its own performance ...


1

If your computer use involves accessing lots of files, I would suggest you mount your HDD with "noatime" option. You will see significant improvement because not every file-read will be written to filesystem. So, in your /etc/fstab add this: UUID=24d75db7-ceca-40f7-ac21-979870a15ad6 / ext4 noatime,errors=remount-ro 0 1 Hope this ...



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