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install a proprietary driver Since you are gaming this is the first thing you should do. You need to enable non-free sources so: Open Ubuntu Software Center go to Edit -> Software Sources Enable the "Proprietary drivers for devices (restricted)" option. Close the Software center run sudo apt-get update to make sure things are up to date go to your systems ...


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Generally instead of stopping the application on overheating, the system will perform an emergency shut down, so I would say that heat is probably not the cause of this particular crash. The game wasn't released that long ago, so it isn't unreasonable for there to be a couple of problems that haven't been ironed out yet. Evidence of Emergency Shutdown: on ...


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It looks to me as if your X installation is running at too low of a resolution. Try this for diagnostics (and maybe to fix it): Open System Settings. Select Displays. Look at the value next to Resolution. Ideally, it will match the maximum resolution of your monitor. If it is, then something else is the cause; but if it's ridiculously low, that confirms my ...


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I managed to get it working after running the following commands: sudo apt-get clean sudo apt-get autoclean sudo apt-get autoremove sudo apt-get install -f


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That's why you're supposed to use the driver which are distrubuted through Ubuntu repositories. When you download driver from Nvidia site, it will modify kernel. The way you are supposed to get to the nvidia drivers (though not newest) is to open Software & Updates from your Ubuntu Dash, click on the Additional Drivers tab and pick the driver from the ...


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That could be your hard drive. Run the following command to prevent unnecessary spin ups and downs which can lead to undue wear to the drive: sudo hdparm -B 254 /dev/sda Then run the following commands to make the changes permanent: echo "/dev/sda* {" | sudo tee -a /etc/hdparm.conf echo " apm = 254" | sudo tee -a /etc/hdparm.conf echo " apm_battery = ...


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I fixed my issue by going into the Ubuntu recovery mode and running sudo apt-add-repository ppa:xorg-edgers/ppa sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install nvidia-current.


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Xorg-edgers not always guarantee what you expect. You might have to remove it. Do the following: sudo add-apt-repository remove ppa:xorg-edgers/ppa or with ppa-purge (it has to be installed) sudo ppa-purge ppa:xorg-edgers/ppa if you can't get to desktop or tty terminal see the link below how to drop to root shell. And after that other solution is ...


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Firstly, sudo apt-get remove --purge nvidia* Enable the Universe and Multiverse repositories - you need to do this to allow the bumblebee and nvidia packages respectively to be installed. Then: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bumblebee/stable sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install bumblebee bumblebee-nvidia primus linux-headers-generic sudo reboot ...


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You’ll need rootly powers use sudo for that. Try this: you can use gdb (GNU Debugger) running as root to manipulate contents of memory. These may interest you: http://sourceware.org/gdb/current/onlinedocs/gdb/ http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3305164/how-to-modify-memory-contents-using-gdb


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/proc/ is a pseudo file system: when you read/write on any /proc/file you don't access a real file or real memory, but you call some specific kernel function (depending of the file) that acts as a file. It returns data if you read the file, set data if you write to the file. And if there is no write function defined for a specific file, writing to the file ...



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