Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I have similar problem too. I use Linux Lubuntu 14.04. an screenshot is attached


0

One potential solution is to replace /usr/share/pixmaps/openshot.svg with something different, maybe a png file. But that's more of a workaround.


1

Install the package nautilus-open-terminal: sudo apt-get install nautilus-open-terminal The bad news is that you will have two options now in your right-click menu. The good news is that one of them works.


0

My issue was with the Windows Server (Windows 7 Home). I tried smbclient -L and got protocol negotiation failed Researched a bit and found: I had to enable the IRPStackSize in Regedit, set the size, and then reboot. Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK. Locate and then click the following registry subkey: ...


0

I downloaded the .deb from the Dropbox site & installed it. I then switched to my second user. When the Dropbox wizard started, I supplied my second user's email address, the wizard downloaded the Dropbox daemon and then downloaded the appropriate folders & their contents to the Dropbox folder. Everything now OK for Dropbox.


1

From what I see there is an error in the path name either in the desktop file or in the script itself. Try editing it. Insted of Cauldon Server use Cauldon_Server. Directory name shouldn't include space.


1

Instead of specifying --geometry parameter, try specifying it with -g parameter. If it still doesn't work, I would consider this a bug. An alternative to using the nautilus' native --geometry parameter, would be to use wmctrl , which can be used to control any other type of graphical window. This app doesn't come by default, so you have to download it ...


1

I fixed this by telling xstarfish to create an output file xstarfish --outfile /location/of/file.png -d 60 This tells xstarfish to update the background file every 60 seconds. Then I just set the background to that file in the unity menus, when xstarfish updates the background, the wallpaper also updates(for some reason).


1

The program does not seem to work with modern desktops. As you say, it generates an image. By default, it generates a pattern with a size of 256x256. I do not know if there is a better way, but you could do the following: Install ImageMagick (for the composite command): sudo apt-get install imagemagick Create a new pattern with this command: xstarfish ...


1

You cannot use %F twice in a command like that, because %F gets replaced by the names of every file selected. For example, a command of sh with parameters -c 'printf "%%s\n" "$@" > foo' %F %F will create a file named foo with the names of every file selected, twice. Therefore the convert command that actually runs is: convert file1.jpg file2.jpg ... ...


3

There is actually a way to do this. Run these commands: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:alessandro-strada/ppa sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install google-drive-ocamlfuse Configure the program by running google-drive-ocamlfuse. Make a mount point in your home directory, called "gdrive": mkdir ~/gdrive. Mount Drive: google-drive-ocamlfuse ~/gdrive. ...


2

User hhlp answer already says that the system folders are: /usr/lib/nautilus/extensions-2.0/python /usr/lib/nautilus/extensions-3.0/python According to this answer, you should also have a look in these directories in your home directory: ~/.local/share/nautilus-python/extensions/ ~/.local/share/nautilus/scripts Still found them on my v14.10.


3

Open Nautilus, the default file manager, by searching the dash for Files or clicking Files in the Launcher. Press Ctrl+F Type your search. You can chose whether to search in the Current folder or All Files. For just txt files, type txt. Not the wildcard (although it may work, I don't think it does).


0

You can also press Enter with the same or a different path. It will change back to the normal button mode.


0

This link provides the best working solution for adding the feature "Open terminal here" as context command menu for a folder. http://www.n00bsonubuntu.net/content/add-open-terminal-here-to-file-menu-ubuntu-14-04/


0

To edit the actual "Places" group, edit the ~/.config/user-dirs.dirs file and add your directories in there. The thing is, that file is automatically generated when you log-on by the xdg-user-dirs-update program. To prevent it from overriding your changes, run the following command: $ echo "enabled=False" > ~/.config/user-dirs.conf For a more detailed ...


3

Since nautilus does not have a command line option to switch between list- and icon view, nor has the option to set view prferences per folder, there is no clean way to do that. Started as an experiment, the option below was to see if it could be done anyway in a reasonably functional way. As mentioned in a comment, the solution is as dirty as it gets, but ...


0

Please, see that nemo is a fork of nautilus, and you can used the nemo-actions instead of nautilus-actions, there are some nautilus actions that are not ported to nemo yet, but could be easy. I not recommend use nautilus and nemo at the same time, but well, i used both and you can decide if nemo will handle your desktop or will be nautilus. You can not ...


0

A GUI method is to open a document from an application such as LibreOffice. Do a Save As and when the window opens, drag the folder into the left column. I haven't a clue as to why the Preference gear was removed from Nautilus, but it should be restored IMHO.


0

You could either: 1) Use the duplicity command line as root to directly restore your files. or 2) Open the Deja Dup settings window and choose restore. When it asks you if you want to restore the files in-place or into a folder, choose into a folder. It will restore everything into that folder and then you can move anything you need into your system ...


0

So this is sort of variation of my answer to this question. Make sure you set the profile in your terminal to hold the window , then create the script bellow, and assign a keyboard shortcut to this script (basicall full path to the script as command of the shortcut). When you are in nautilus folder where you wanna run java compiler, run #!/bin/sh # set ...


1

Thank you for your help @Helio, you were right about the program not being able to access the partition before it changed the file. However I don’t think it was a problem with not mounting before the program ran, I used NTFS Configuration tools to change the read/write settings and that fixed it. To people having the same problem: Install NTFS Configuration ...


0

https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/gvfs/+bug/1160847: The workaround I am using: Add this rule to /lib/udev/rules.d/69-libmtp.rules #skip Nexus 4/10 for UT debug ATTR{idVendor}=="18d1", ATTR{idProduct}=="4ee2", GOTO="libmtp_rules_end" Add a new file to /etc/udev/rules.d called 99-android.rules # enable access to nexus devices ...


1

Thank you Antonio Molinaro for the great answer! I don't have enough reputation points to comment directly. However, I wanted to pay homage somehow - I'm very new to ask Ubuntu, but I look forward to participating more in the near future. I am running 14.04 and these commands worked wonderfully, right away!: sudo nano /usr/share/applications/baobab.desktop ...


2

While you are still editing the file name, press Esc to cancel the renaming without applying any changes. (You can still see the original name in the status bar in the lower right corner) Once you confirmed it, you still can revert it with Ctrl+Z or through the Menu > Undo Renaming. This seems even to work after the Nautilus window was closed and ...


-1

Simply confirm the file name change, then go to Edit → Undo Renaming. ctrl+Z also works but you first have to confirm the file name change.


0

I edited the .svg files and changed the width="59.056px" height="59.056px" into 512px each and refreshed folder view.


1

If you do not want to use /etc/fstab (e.g. bad on multi-user PCs, no root access) or don't want to save your user password to a text file in your home folder (e.g. no encrypted file system) using gvfs-mount smb://$SERVERIP/$SHARE < ~/.smbcredentials_gvfs, run this shell script on startup (or whenever you want): #!/bin/bash USERID=`id -u $USER`; # Needed ...


0

While I'm not quite sure sure what you exactly mean by "opening your files" and where you were expecting your hard drives to appear, I'll take a stab at it. My guess is that you haven't lost your data. My guess is that you just don't have the disk mounted. If indeed you have multiple hard drives, other than the one you're running ubuntu on, Ubuntu ...


2

The fix to the problem was reasonably simple, and makes me feel a little dumb. All I had to do was go into the directory that contains the file (with the terminal) then I type sudo ldconfig and, hey presto! It works like a charm. Apparently the problem occurred because the executable couldn't find the libraries, but from double clicking in nautilus, I didn't ...


0

Open a terminal and type the following command to fix the problem: mkdir ~/Music problem fixed. It is possible you may have dragged the original Music directory into another directory so if there were any music files in that folder, just do a search for them and move them to ~/Music.


1

Before changing defaults system-wide, you should thoroughly test something like a new file manager in one of your users first by adding nemo as the default file manager in the start-up applications... One user: Go to the dash, then type startup applications and add: by using nemo -n in the command. Then disable Nautilus from drawing the desktop icons by ...


0

On my system (Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS), the file you want is found at ~/.config/gtk-3.0/bookmarks Older versions used to keep this in ~/.gtk-bookmarks. Entries are URIs, so filepaths must be absolute and prefixed with file://.


0

gsettings set org.gnome.nautilus.preferences sort-directories-first true


1

I ended up creating separate NTFS filesystem partitions for work_partition(Work Folders) and play_partition(Multimedia). This shows up in the side bar of Nautilus file manager like in bookmarks but under devices sub-menu, which is more readable and better organized the way I want it. And also has the advantages of being usable by Microsoft Windows 7,8 or ...


0

The problem was apparently solved by one of the opulent kernel updates of the last weeks. Looks like I had a bit of luck ;-)


0

First of all, you should use names to refer to your machines on the network, rather than IPs. You should be able to configure a DHCP+DNS server like dnsmasq fairly easily, to allow you to provide meaningful names that you will remember. Beyond that, the device you are connecting to, must be running an FTP server, in order for FTP to be usable.


0

You should make sure your both machines are on the same 'logical' network and you could ping each other. If your local IP adress is, for example, '192.168.0.1' then your remote machine should be on that same subnet e.g. '192.168.0.2'. Find out the adress which is on the same subnet using ifconfig on the remote machine, then try to ping this adress from your ...


0

An even more general approach than those already presented - I have the following in my ~/.bashrc: open() { for file in "$@" do xdg-open "$file" > /dev/null 2>&1 if [ "$?" != 0 ]; then echo "$file"": Failed to open" else echo "$file"": Opened successfully" fi done } xdg-open is a useful program that opens ...


9

As well as nautilus . you can also do: xdg-open . and it will do the same as if you double clicked a file in nautilus. Which also means you can open a spreadsheet in LibreOffice with xdg-open mysheet.ods etc. I have it aliased to xopen for slightly quicker typing by putting the following in my .bashrc alias xopen=xdg-open


6

Install the nemo file manager: it has a terminal-and-file-manager-in-one. My nemo is customised with home-brewn steam punk icons, but you get the point... ;-) Commands to install: sudo sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/nemo sudo apt-get install nemo Optional packages: (bold ones are the ones I've got installed as well) nemo-dbg - File manager ...


7

Once inside your terminal, simply type nautilus . to open a new nautilus window. There is also a file explorer for the terminal itself. Type: sudo apt-get install mc Then when in a directory, type mc to open it. Screenshot of Midnight Commander(MC) File Manager: I use MC all the time in tty. It's mainly keyboard shortcuts and although you can click ...


24

From your terminal, just open nautilus as follow: nautilus . It will open a new instance of Nautilus in the directory where you were in your Terminal. From the nautilus man page: SYNOPSIS nautilus [options] URIs...


-1

Another easy way is sudo gnome-open foldername Or I would recommend installing nemo file manager. It has 'open as root' in its right click context menu



Top 50 recent answers are included