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0

Also, I use ^H (ctl+h) in the folder view. Works on 16.04, 15.10, 14.04. for sure. This may give you the desired results and it is a toggle, once to show hidden files, once more to hide them.


0

Nuatilus - File- preferences - check show hidden files


1

You should change owners. run this command sudo chown newuser: /media/kalenpw/HDD Instead of the "newuser" put your Ubuntu user


1

You can use Nautilus scripts like this: https://www.gnome-look.org/p/1007672/ The installation and what you need to get this done is well explained there. Installation: Quick installation as a nautilus script, under GNOME 3 desktop environment: $ git clone https://github.com/emericg/OpenSubtitlesDownload.git $ mkdir -p ~/.local/share/nautilus/scripts/ $ ...


1

For this to work, you need to know the IP Address of the server you are connecting to. I haven't tested it with the server name. Open up nautilus (Files) and press Ctrl + L Type this smb://IP-ADDRESS-OF-SERVER/ and it will take you to that server directly. Example: If I wanted to connect to the server with this IP 192.168.0.46 I would type: smb://192....


0

A mounted file system should stay mounted. If you want to keep your mounted fs after a reboot/power failure, etc, you can make an entry for the fs in /etc/fstab. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Fstab regards


3

Nautilus uses the net usershare info command to get information about non-root user defined Samba shares. See the net manpage for more about this command. If that command fails Nautilus assumes there are no such shares and displays the error message it got just in case you want it. Creating the folder /var/lib/samba/usershares/ should prevent the message ...


0

In Nautilus try Bookmarks > Bookmarks. You can edit the locations of the bookmarked folders.


1

Press F5 to refresh or reload.


2

Mountpoints for other partitions should be in /media Make a new mountpoint for your NTFS partition: mkdir /media/windows or if not windows then whatever you prefer to call it Now edit your fstab to correspond to that mountpoint: UUID=5CB5FBB62D2AA5D5 /media/windows ntfs rw,auto,users,exec,nls=utf8,umask=003,gid=46,uid=1000 0 0 On reboot the ...


0

To create a mount point first, run "sudo mkdir /media/drive_name", in place of "drive_name", choose anything you like Now in terminal run "sudo nano /etc/fstab" #/etc/fstab: static file system information. # #Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a #device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices #that ...


0

I was using udisks to mount an NTFS partition on the same disk as the OS. My command looked like this /usr/bin/udisks --mount /dev/disk/by-uuid/ I used this command in 16.04 (mint 18): udisksctl mount --block-device /dev/disk/by-uuid/


5

One fairly straightforward way would be to use zenity e.g. # basic syntax zenity --file-selection --directory --filename="$PWD/" A simple code (source: gnome zenity help) #!/bin/bash DIR=`zenity --file-selection --directory --title="Select a File"` case $? in 0) echo "\"$DIR\" selected.";; 1) echo "No ...


0

You can follow steps given here First install dconf-tools sudo apt-get install dconf-tools After installation open dconf-editor go to org –> gnome –> nautilus –> preferences and choose always-use-location-entry


0

I'm really sorry but it seems my mistake. I have some CIFS mounts in fstab, so if the CIFS server is down, it affects nautilus and it doesn't display local devices, even local unmounted hard drives and USB thumb drives connected after boot. Theese are the lines of my CIFS mount in fstab //localserver/storage /media/storage cifs x-systemd.automount,_netdev,...


-1

Fast method (be sure about the UUID): $ sudo gedit /etc/fstab # /etc/fstab: static file system information. # # Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a # device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices # that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5). # # <file system> <mount point> &...


1

Easily force reloading the thumbnails by simply touching the file(s). touch * Make sure you cd to the folder first. If you want more control on what you touch (eheh), just update the glob to taste, e.g. *.mkv. No need to put your hands in automated configuration folders. The problem often happens because the thumbnail manager is called as soon as the ...


3

Use this instead: #!/bin/bash /home/$USER/.local/bin/jupyter notebook or #!/bin/bash /usr/local/bin/jupyter notebook If that still doesn't work, replace the path to jupyter with the output of the following command: which jupyter


0

right click on the file -> open with -> other application -> view all applications -> run software -> select from now on shell scripts will be run on double click.


3

These are not errors. These are warnings and all warnings are to be ignored. With that said, you should use sudo -i to run gtk applications with sudo. sudo -i nautilus These warnings are normal and are to be ignored safely. Although a fix is not necessary, there is a workaround. The only work around requires you install the development files: sudo ...


0

It is not necessary to format the flash drive or to nuke the partition. You can go to mount and then change the ownership of your flashdrive. On ubuntu : cd /media sudo chown -R username drivename Of course replace username by your username and drivename by the name of your flash drive. Then you will be able to use nautilus as usual to copy/move/delete ...


-1

How to you use wildcards, especially the * (star) in Linux Ubuntu Nautilus GUI File Search? I also was just struggling with this issue, but I think I found an answer. Here are the equivalent Windows and Nautilus search patterns: Windows: diagram*.ppt Nautilus: diagram ppt Basically, try using a spacebar character in Nautilus where you would use a * ...


7

The prefix 0 already makes the file to be sorted at very first in Nautilus. What can come before the very first file? No files could, except directories. This is true regardless of locale in use. File naming In the following example, I first created an empty text file named apple.txt then made multiple copies and rename each of the files by adding single ...


1

One answer can be found at this link: Nautilus Guide under the heading "Nautilus Sort". It's a way of changing the way Nautilus handles special characters when sorting filenames.


0

I have success with naming files using the prefix aa. Say the original file name is info.txt - the name would be aa.info.txt. One could extend this with "aaa." or "bb." etc. I would avoid special characters and spaces, some of which could make composition of scripts undully complicated.


1

You can add 'nautilus' to the list for the blacklist key under com.canonical.unity-gtk-module in dconf. # gsettings set com.canonical.unity-gtk-module blacklist "['nautilus']" This will force the menu bar to be shown inside the window, and not integrated into the title bar or top panel.


0

The only workaround that I am aware of is to select the "Forget password immediately" option while logging into the server. It showld be a radio button right beneath the username/password fill form. That way when you unmount the device, you will be able to login again as the same ot different user.


4

Nautilus search ... if tracker is available it will show the results from that. From the link: Tracker provides the following: Indexer for desktop search (for more details see this spec : https://wiki.ubuntu.com/IntegratedDesktopSearch) Tag database for doing keyword tagging of any object Extensible metadata database for apps like gedit ...


2

Have you tried space zero as a prefix? [ 0cat.py] The other characters you mentioned does not work for me too but space zero works fine. You can also try other combinations of spacial chars and zero, things like: -0cat.pay, _0cat.py, etc. these should work too.



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