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You can create a hex-dump of your file with xxd which is part of the vim-common package. xxd file.csv | less Then check the line endings: 0a => \n 0d => \r 0d0a => \r\n


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You can use the file to give you an indication of the type of line endings. Unix: $ file file1.txt file1.txt: ASCII text DOS: $ file file2.txt file2.txt: ASCII text, with CRLF line terminators and knowing that DOS uses carriage return and line feed ("\r\n") as a line ending, which Unix uses just line feed ("\n"). So you can determine what is EOL of ...


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If you can't find mysql.h then it probably isn't anywhere in your filesystem unless you have one of these three packages installed which provides mysql.h: libmariadbclient-dev - /usr/include/mysql/mysql.h libmysqlclient-dev - /usr/include/mysql/mysql.h pike7.8-mysql - /usr/lib/pike7.8/7.4/include/mysql.h


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try $ find /usr/ -name 'mysql.h' or perhaps it is present at /usr/include/mysql/mysql.h. (Iam not sure)


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Linux americostechadmin-phpserver 3.13.0-53-generic #89-Ubuntu SMP Wed May 20 10:34:28 UTC 2015 i686 i686 i686 GNU/Linux This shows that your system is 32 bit i686 instead you are installing 64bit package, so this raises that errors. To solve that run the command: sudo apt-get -f install press y , this would remove the package you are going to ...


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Reset your MySQL root password by doing the following: sudo service mysql.server stop then start mysql skipping table granting sudo mysqld --skip-grant-tables & Login to MySQL as root mysql -u root mysql Change your root password UPDATE user SET Password=PASSWORD('new-password') WHERE User='root'; FLUSH PRIVILEGES; exit; Restart mysql sudo ...


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Edit: Just read the title to the end and noticed you're on 12.10! Upgrade! Upgrade immediately! You are literally years behind on security updates. Actually, it's probably easier to just do a fresh install of 14.04 (a LTS version, see below) than upgrading to 13.04 (dead), 13.10 (dead) and then to 14.04. And not meaning to scare you, but there have been ...


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You can use this script to fix wordpress permission: #!/bin/bash # # This script configures WordPress file permissions based on recommendations # from http://codex.wordpress.org/Hardening_WordPress#File_permissions # # Author: Michael Conigliaro <mike [at] conigliaro [dot] org> # WP_OWNER=www-data # <-- wordpress owner WP_GROUP=www-data # <-- ...


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use rcconf to enable/disable a service to auto run on boot. sudo apt-get install rcconf Now, type sudo rcconf And you will see list of services that are installed on your Ubuntu machine. Those marked with star are auto run during boot process. To disable Apache, MySql just navigate to it using arrows and press space bar. Then navigate to OK button using ...


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Problem solved. I ran sudo apt-get install --reinstall mysql-server and this upgraded from 5.5 to 5.6. Oh well. But at least I have a running mysqld.


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For me, MySQL broke after I upgraded from 14.04 to 15.04 and after I switched from systemd back to Upstart. Interestingly, I could start mysql manually, but I could not get it to start via /etc/init.d/ (i.e., with sudo service mysql start). After reading over the Ubuntu Upstart script, it became clear that Ubuntu expects apparmor to be present in order to ...


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mysql has it's own apt repo: https://dev.mysql.com/doc/mysql-apt-repo-quick-guide/en/ backup your dbs first: mysqldump -u root --all-databases > mysql.dump check what's installed: dpkg -l | grep mysql remove all installed mysql packages follow the steps in the guide, use the same root password as before worked here


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After a bit more searching, I found the answer was the MySQL setup. In the /etc/mysql/my.cnf, MySQL was only listening on port 3306 for local traffic. This was fixed by removing the line bind-address = 127.0.0.1 in the my.cnf file.


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I had the same problem (upgrade to 15.04, using official files and config). I had to make the following changes to be able to stop the mysql daemon manually with sytemctl and automatically on system reboot/shutdown: Make /etc/mysql/debian.cnf readable for the mysql user with sudo chgrp mysql /etc/mysql/debian.cnf; sudo chmod 640 /etc/mysql/debian.cnf ...


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Make sure your my.cnf doesn't have any options that have been deprecated. I had a similar problem because I had default-character-set listed under [mysqld], but in the newer version of mysql this had been renamed to character_set_server. However, mysql very unhelpfully let me know of this by simply hanging when trying to start the service. And the package ...


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Easiest method (as the Ubuntu Wiki suggests): sudo dpkg-reconfigure mysql-server-N.N replace N.N with the version of MySql.


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First make sure that mysql can write to /home/username/Desktop/basic/; if you're planning to do multiple dumps in the same directory, a pretty clean way to do it would be to set the ownership of the folder to mysql and to set the SGID permission on the folder (thanks to muru for this suggestion): this way mysqldump will be able to write to the folder, but ...


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mysql is already running open your terminal with ctrl+alt+T and type the following command... sudo /etc/init.d/mysqld stop if not working this command then please type... sudo /opt/lampp/sbin/mysqld stop


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I uninstalled apache2 in synaptic, then ran sudo /opt/lampp/lampp start and it worked.


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Check the logs while starting mysql: In one terminal: tail -f /var/log/mysql/error.log In another one: sudo service mysql start (maybe you first need to stop the service with sudo service mysql stop). If there are errors, you need to fix them. In my case I had following errors: [ERROR] mysqld: unknown variable 'table_cache=256' [ERROR] Aborting ...


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You may have figured this out already, but hopefully it may help someone else running into the same problem. My 14.10-15.04 upgrade stuck at where the process tried to start mysqld with some obscure message about root admin password. I proceeded to see what mysqld process is running, and found that its process id is completely different than the one the ...


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Resolved: I wasn't specifying a database name when invoking the mysql command line interface! Auto-completion works as expected if I go in as: mysql -u root -p mysql # or mysql -u root -p mydatabase as opposed to: mysql -u root -p (and --auto-rehash clearly is on by default as per the docs)


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To install a package in Ubuntu you can easily just run the command sudo apt-get install package-name So for example to install the package apache2 you can use sudo apt-get install apache2 This default installation method will install the latest version of package founded in your repositories. So in order to install a specific version you should use ...


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Wrong permissions, the server runs as mysql. Correct with: sudo chown -R mysql:mysql /var/lib/mysql/databasename example: % top -u mysql PID USER PR NI VIRT RES SHR S %CPU %MEM TIME+ COMMAND ...


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If you haven't attempted this already, use: mysql_install_db /usr/bin/mysql_secure_installation


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The ownCloud installation requires access to a database such as MySQL on the server it is running on, in your case this is your PC. When you install MySQL, you become the MySQL root and have to create a new database, which you give the name and password to be used by ownCloud. This should get you started: sudo apt-get install mysql-server As far as I ...


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for Lamp installation with best configuration: sudo apt-get install lamp-server^ for project configuration my recommendation for you ubuntu documentation



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