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4

I recently upgrade my Ubuntu 15.04 to 16.04 and this has worked for me: 1 - First, connect in sudo mysql sudo mysql -u root 2 - Check your accounts present in your db SELECT User,Host FROM mysql.user; +------------------+-----------+ | User | Host | +------------------+-----------+ | admin | localhost | | debian-sys-maint | ...


2

Instead of XAMPP you may use LAMP(Linux Apache MySQL PHP) mostly. Using LAMP you may also face this problem. In my case(using Ubuntu 15.10), I had configured/set post_max_size, upload_max_filesize, max_execution_time, max_input_time, memory_limit following my needs using php.ini file which is located at /etc/php5/apache2/php.ini But still I was faced this ...


2

I found the problem. I had replaced the default php.ini file with one from a different server, and that must have messed it up. I reinstalled LAMP & phpmyadmin, this time leaving php.ini alone, and it worked just fine.


2

I downloaded the mysql-server-5.7 package to test: $ apt-get download 'mysql-server*' Get:1 http://mirror.cse.iitk.ac.in/ubuntu xenial-security/main amd64 mysql-server all 5.7.12-0ubuntu1 [10.1 kB] Get:2 http://mirror.cse.iitk.ac.in/ubuntu xenial-security/main amd64 mysql-server-5.7 amd64 5.7.12-0ubuntu1 [2,584 kB] Get:3 http://mirror.cse.iitk.ac.in/ubuntu ...


2

we were also facing same issue after Upgarde from 14.04 to 16.04 Solved the problem by removing myisam-recover = BACKUP and key_buffer = 16M from my.cnf Then use "sudo service mysql start" to start the MySQL daemon again and "sudo apt-get -f install" to recover your system packaging state. here I found it https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/mysql-5....


2

It's a normal file so you can cp top create a backup sudo cp /etc/mysql/my.cnf /etc/mysql/my.cnf.backup and restore it sudo cp /etc/mysql/my.cnf.backup /etc/mysql/my.cnf You may use whatever file name and path you want instead of /etc/mysql/my.cnf.backup


1

1st make a mysqldump of all your databases (including information_schema). Then "stop" mysql" and this will remove anything related to mysql: sudo apt-get purge mysql-server mysql-client mysql-common mysql-server-core-5.7 mysql-client-core-5.7 sudo rm -rf /etc/mysql /var/lib/mysql sudo apt-get autoremove sudo apt-get autoclean and then sudo apt-get ...


1

It should be as simple as making a copy of the file. Then, if something goes wrong, you can just delete your modified file and rename the copy. I would do: sudo cp /etc/mysql/my.cnf /etc/mysql/my.cnf.bak then: sudo nano /etc/mysql/my.cnf To restore: sudo rm /etc/mysql/my.cnf sudo mv /etc/mysql/my.cnf.bak /etc/mysql/my.cnf


1

Completely disabling IPv6 is getting harder and harder these days. In many operating systems and for many applications it's a crucial component now. if you really want to remove all traces of IPv6 then your only option might be to recompile a lot of software with different options. I think the best option In most cases is to leave it enabled and configure ...


1

Installation of the MySQL server involves roughly three steps: 1) unpacking the software; 2) creating a default database; 3) creating a default user/password (and storing this in the database). Should you accidentally lose the database files (usually located in /var/lib/mysql) then you can start again without completely reinstalling the server package. ...


1

For remote access: Check etc\mysql\my.cnf to see that the bind-address is not set to 127.0.0.1. Either set it to 0.0.0.0, or, to be more secure, add your IP address: bind-address = 127.0.0.1 bind-address = your_public_ip Create a user in the mysql table: CREATE USER 'non-root-user'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'any_password_u_like'; CREATE USER '...


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You can certainly disable apache and MySQL services on boot. They won't make a huge difference, but unless you are using them, they don't necessarily need to be running. Also, disabling virtualbox should not cause any errors.


1

Run the following commands: mkdir MYSQL cd MYSQL sudo apt-get download mysql-common ar xvf mysql* tar xvf dat* sudo cp ./etc/mysql/my.cnf.fallback /etc/mysql/my.cnf.fallback sudo dpkg -i mysql*deb cd sudo apt-get -f isntall


1

It looks like there's something wrong with your PHP version. Try this: # sudo apt-get update # sudo apt-get install php7.0-mysql php7.0-curl php7.0-json php7.0-cgi php7.0 libapache2-mod-php7


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This is fixed in MySQL 5.7.13 (see Bug 80772): https://dev.mysql.com/doc/relnotes/mysql/5.7/en/news-5-7-13.html#mysqld-5-7-13-bug This fixed it for me. At the moment the highest version available through apt is 5.7.12 so to get 5.7.13 you can use one of the options here: https://dev.mysql.com/downloads/mysql/ Take your time though. I used the MySQL PPA to ...


1

I had the same problem with mysqldump 5.7.13 in a script launched by crontab. You can set the .mylogin.cnf file location using the MYSQL_TEST_LOGIN_FILE environment variable before calling the mysqldump command : export MYSQL_TEST_LOGIN_FILE=/root/.mylogin.cnf mysqldump --login-path=mysqldump [...]



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