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3

You can do it in 2 ways, by editing the php.ini file or using .htaccess If you edit the php.ini file which is located in /etc/php5/apache2/php.ini Find the value that says upload_max_filesize and change it to the value you wish, for example here I have a max upload file size of 100M upload_max_filesize = 100M Now you also need to edit the post_max_size ...


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I have encounter the same problem when I init my small VPS. The issue is caused by small memory. So without spending extra money to increase the memory which you not needed, you could simply create swap files to aids the installation. Yes the swap is slow, but all you need is get the install done. On Ubuntu 14.04, I do the following to solve the problem: ...


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You can relax. There is in general no notion of "conflict" between distinct web (and SQL) servers running on different machines - given, of course, that they aren't configured to share the same IP address, which would be a problem in general. All you have to do is, of course, to make sure you use the correct IP address or hostname for the machine you want ...


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User names are actaully just mappings to UIDs stored in /etc/passwd. Similarly group names are mapped to GIDs from /etc/group. The IDs are decided as and when they are required. 0 is always root but almost everything else is decided when the user and groups are created. These *IDs are near-arbitrary integers that the system interprets as defined users and ...


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There are problems here in attempting to do what you are asking and keeping your package manager happy. Off the top, I see two choices here: compile/install from scratch to an entirely different directory hierarchy If I recall, there is a way to install packages using a different base root directory. Do that and then manually make the necessary changes. ...


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To show errors in PHP, edit your php.ini file and change: display_errors = on Restart your apache server. Then in your project config.php file (if you have one), add these lines: /* errors handling */ error_reporting(E_ALL); ini_set("display_errors",1); ini_set('log_errors',0); ini_set('error_log','path/to/log/file'); During development, set ...


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Could anyone please comment what I have missed during Ubuntu setup, that I am allowed to nothing on my system? You wont be able to edit my.cnf because its protected by its permissions from regular users writing to it. You could change the permissions or the group of the file but this really isn't necessary and could compromise security. Like you have ...


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You are using ln -s with the arguments the wrong way round. Think cp when you use ln: the source comes first, the destination last. You want to have a link /var/lib/mysql pointing to actual directory /home/databasesmysql. If you were copying you would do: cp -r /home/databasesmysql /var/lib/mysql So with ln -s you do: ln -s /home/databasesmysql ...


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You seem to be missing the INFILE keyword - the syntax should be something like LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE './table1.csv' REPLACE INTO TABLE table1 FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' LINES TERMINATED BY '\n'; Also, LOAD DATA LOCAL is likely disabled by default - although you should be able to enable it explicitly on the mysql client command line using the ...


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Ok, following advice from Trouble downloading updates due to a "Hash sum mismatch" error, I cleared out APT's lists and re-synced it. Everything fine now. Just remove the content of /var/lib/apt/lists directory: sudo rm -fR /var/lib/apt/lists/* then run: sudo apt-get update


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Sorry... It's not that easy. What you have to understand to see why this doesn't work is that when MySQL Server is running, it assumes (with some limited exceptions that aren't important, here) that nothing else will be tinkering with its files, and that it maintains some internal concepts, in memory, about the state of the files, that it assumes can't ...


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use the command sudo nano /etc/mysql/my.cnf and change the bind address to your local host or 127.0.0.1 then save and close the my.cnf window. Then run the below command sudo service mysql start then try login mysql -u root -p


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I will add this incase someone faces similar issues. I tried all the uninstalling and re-installing to no avail. The key to finding the solution was that upstart places it's error logs in this folder /var/log/upstart/ for mysql /var/log/upstart/mysql.log when I opened it had this message AppArmor parser error for /etc/apparmor.d/usr.sbin.mysqld in ...


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UBUNTU SOLUTION Usually this problem appear when you try to change something in the /etc/mysql/my.cnf. To fix it (works most of time), you will need to follow some steps (these step will try to normalize the MySQL instance) First, try to reboot the server (if it doesn't work, follow to the next steps): sudo reboot Other steps: First, create a backup ...



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