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To establish dual monitors with LXDE, install Arandr from Synaptics. Then follow the instructions in this "How To". http://lxlinux.com/#14


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I suspect it is easier than you think. Although I've never actually done this myself, about a year ago I had an in-depth conversation with a mega-geek who swears that ANY graphics card with a single DVI port is in fact already capable of displaying two different images on two separate monitors, and that all you need is a DVI cable splitter, similar to this ...


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The standard Ubuntu NVidia drivers generate some problems on slightly older and slightly newer NVidia hardware. If you want more then the standard Ubuntu repository drivers, install the xorg.edgers PPA. As the xorg.edgers group ask not to give installation instructions directly without linking to their page, this is the best I can do. If you don't know ...


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It's very probably a hardware issue: You've probably only got 2 cheap on-board video adapters that can run a max of 1 screen each therefore you can only connect one monitor to one of the display ports for each card... :-( If you need 4 screens, you need to add 2 more cheap video adapters, or one more expensive one (one that can drive 2 monitors) Just to be ...


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Kinda stupid that I can't just comment, but whatever. It might be an overscan problem. There should be a 'just scan' option on your TV. If not, it might be an overscanning problem with Ubuntu, which can be set in xorg config settings. Does your mouse 'hit' the top of the screen? Or does it go past the top?


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Thanks for replies! :) I can set up the displays on both monitors. But the thing is now: When i put the screens in configuration in proper order (left and right as it is in real) then display is extended (for ex. browser) on both monitors and i cant simply maximize window on one of them (it is maximized on both screens). When i switch places in ...


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Intel has a open source driver, you can download with the following link. https://download.01.org/gfx/ubuntu/14.04/main/pool/main/i/intel-linux-graphics-installer/intel-linux-graphics-installer_1.0.7-0intel1_amd64.deb go to the download location and run sudo apt-get install mesa-utils sudo dpkg -i ...


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I have to same problem too. It seems to happen after the latest Nvidia update. Anyhow I tried the following and that worked for me: Go to Nvidia control panel (e.g Nvidia X server setting) Go to PRIME Profiles tab and select "Intel(Power saving mode)" instead of NVIDIA(Performance Mode). I don't really understand what was happening, hope something ask ...


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Use arandr Screen Layout Editor to configure the montitor easily


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I didn't use booting. just go to System Setting > Display. Set on another display and 800x600 resolution and then press apply. no problem at all on Ubuntu 14.04.


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Check running the below command from your terminal window and see whether this helps, Resetting an out-of-range resolution rm ~/.config/monitors.xml You can direct xrandr to set a different resolution like this: $ xrandr --output LVDS --mode 1024x768 $ xrandr --output VGA1 --mode 1024x768 Hope this helps


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That's weird you don't see bios/grub menu's on the monitor. Do you have the laptop lid open? Also, it would help if we knew what laptop model it was. Usually you can boot to a live cd even in the state that it's in. Just plug in a monitor with the computer lid closed(but open just enough so you can turn it on) so you get video so you can a least know what ...


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I did not find a "secret" setting to change the behaviour of the, as it seems, designed behaviour. It looks indeed as if the left screen is assumed to be the "base" screen. It is however very well possible to create a workaround, with essentially the same result. You can create a script that, on the occasion of connecting a second screen, lists all windows. ...


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I was able to remedy this by opening General->Display Settings in CCSM and changing "Overlapping Output Handling" to anything other than "Smart".


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Seems like it accidently, changed the order of your screens. Go to screen settings and change the order.


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Don't go to the NVidia site to download their driver, as you'll never get rid of it in the future. The standard Ubuntu NVidia drivers generate some problems on slightly older and slightly newer NVidia hardware. If you want more then the standard Ubuntu repository drivers, install the xorg.edgers PPA. As the xorg.edgers group ask not to give installation ...


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This sounds like a video drive issue. Are you connecting the displays to the onboard Intel video controller or the NVIDIA controller? If you are using the NVIDIA controller, I'd recommend going to the NVIDIA site, looking up the NVS5200M video controller, downloading the driver for Linux, and then reload the driver and reboot the system.


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Install arandr sudo apt-get install arandr 2. Run xrandr If your chosen resolution exists (regardless of which monitor it appears by) then skip the next step If your resolution does not exist, create it by doing the following: In this example the resolution I want is 1280x1024 cvt 1280 1024 This will create a modeline like this: "1280x1024_60.00" ...


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14.04 In later versions of Gnome, you have to open gnome-tweak-tool and, under "Workspaces", change the "Workspaces only on primary display" setting.


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I upgraded to 14.10 and all my problems went away.


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Depending on how technical you are (If not, do not read any further) there might be a solution to your problems. As you're running 14.10 (bleeding edge), I would add the xorg-edgers PPA to your system. Read https://launchpad.net/~xorg-edgers/+archive/ubuntu/ppa first as you need to know that these are bleeding-edge drivers. That being said, the ...


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The command xrandr -s 0 should reset your displays in terminal. More can be found at the following site or from man xrandr in terminal. https://linuxacademy.com/blog/linux/solution-resetting-your-screen-resolution-with-xrandr/


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Since we indicated through the comments that the NVIDIA Drivers are not installed try to reinstall the nvidia drivers by following the the linked doc under section Installation without X / from the console https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BinaryDriverHowto/Nvidia sudo apt-get install --reinstall nvidia-331 did the trick. (Check Edit 2)


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Your problem may be with the NVidia drivers. Try using the open source Nouveau drivers. Go to the Additional Drivers page and select the "Open Source - Nouveau" option.


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Daisy chain support is in stable Linux kernel now. Please see my answer http://askubuntu.com/a/552094/349788 If Surface Pro has Intel graphics abroad then chain is likely to work at new Linux kernel and latest video drivers.


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Dual displays can be enabled quite easily. I have that same Dell e7240 with 2 displays up an running via dock. Please see my answer http://askubuntu.com/a/552094/349788


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I was having the same problem on Ubuntu 14.10. I have a dell Latitude e7440 running with 2 additional screens for a total of 3 screens thanks to this post: https://01.org/linuxgraphics/node/358 After having my screens working I was disappointed because I wasn't being able to drag a window e.g. the Mozilla browser, from one screen to the other, but I found ...


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There are workarounds: you can, for example, adjust dpi for the most dense screen, and use xrandr to downscale other screens (to keep it crisp). See my answer for a relative question: Is it possible to have two different DPI configurations for two different screens? PS: sorry, the topic is a duplicate, but I do not know how mark it as duplicate - so just ...


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There are workarounds: you can, for example, adjust dpi for the most dense screen, and use xrandr to downscale other screens (to keep it crisp). See my answer for a relative question: Is it possible to have two different DPI configurations for two different screens?


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It seems people are still struggling trying to work with several monitors and HiDPI displays. A good workaround is described in arch wiki https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/HiDPI#External_displays . So, I have: laptop asus ln303ux: 3200x1800, external monitor: 1920x1200 Now I use Ubuntu 14.10 & GNOME Shell 3.12.2 that has pretty usable HiDPI ...


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This worked for me: gsettings set org.gnome.shell.overrides workspaces-only-on-primary false


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I got the trick. In the Display setting you see both scree BUT the primary display have a title bar with the date at the up. You need to click on this bar and drag it to the monitor you want primary. Apply et voila


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You can use a program called ARandR. It is basically the perfect program for your needs. Description: ARandR is a visual front end for XRandR 1.2/1.3 (per display options), which provides full control over positioning, saving and loading to/from shell scripts and easy integration with other applications. If not already done, you can install ARandR via ...


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I have no solution for you. I just wanted to point out that from the output of lspci and lshw, you seem to have not one but two graphic cards. the second not being initialised by any driver: *-display:1 UNCLAIMED configuration: latency=0 Edit: and a place to look for more information is /var/log/Xorg.0.log, and the other log files like ...


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I spent too much time with exactly the same issue: X loads correct settings, then, when I log in, settings are overwritten. As I am on a fully encrypted single user machine (and therefore don't care about login), my option was to install nodm which replaces lightdm or other display managers. It has to be enabled and configured in /etc/default/nodm to ...


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I like Put to next Output with Ctrl + Alt + n enjoy it! Put at CCSM. Put to Next Output


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Same here on a Siemens laptop: without NVidia driver, no HDMI. I circumvented the NVidia driver problem by adding "bleeding edge" drivers (not yet released to the general public) If that's the route you want to take too, just add the PPA of xorg-edgers (you can roll back to previous drivers if the latest (but not always greatest) doesn't work)



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