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1

I will give an answer, which can be understood by a newbie. This problem happened because Windows had not been shut down properly before you removed it completely, if I am correct. You can mount this partition as read-only. Run in terminal: sudo mkdir /media/NTFS-disk sudo mount -o ro /dev/sda1 /media/NTFS-disk Now you can copy all your files from that ...


0

This happens when you have dual boot with Windows 8. You click on the partition in Nautilus expecting it to mount, On the contrary it fails. You need to do this via a command line. You may not have permissions to modify the partition however you can then mount it as read only with: sudo mount -t "ntfs" -ro ...


0

Disable Fast Startup in Windows. Follow this link to know how to do in Windows 8. When you shutdown(in Windows 7 and 8 )/hibernate windows, it saves the state of the system and doesn't completely shut it down. Thus, by default when you log in to Ubuntu, it fails to access all those windows partitions.Once Fast Startup is disabled in windows, you will be ...


1

Here's how I'd do it: First - I'd create a new filesystem on your partition: Start by unmountig your partiton: sudo umount /dev/sda7 Then, create the new filesystem: sudo mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda7 WARNING: this will erase all contents of /dev/sda7 partition. Then, I'd temporarily mount it somewhere; sudo mount /dev/sda7 /mnt Then, I'd copy the contents of ...


1

You can mount the 359GB partition in /home instead of /NewFolder Boot from a live CD/USB Mount /dev/sda5 and /dev/sda7 Run sudo mv /mountpoint/to/dev/sda5/home/* /mountpoint/to/dev/sda7 Edit /etc/fstab On the line that mounts /NewFolder, replace /NewFolder by /home Original line: UUID=efd23971-f61a-41f3-bd28-bbdf76c74673 /NewFolder ext4 ...


3

Sure, it's possible Replace <your_user_name> with your user name and NewFolder with a name of your choice. Create a new mount point, eg: mkdir ~/NewFolder and mount sudo mount /dev/sda7 $HOME/NewFolder If it works then change the entry in your fstab: sudo nano /etc/fstab from this UUID=efd23971-f61a-41f3-bd28-bbdf76c74673 /NewFolder ...


1

The home folder is supposed to hold your user folder. When you mount a partition to /Home the first thing that is created on that partition is the user's directory. You can mount any partition to /home and use. If you value the data in that folder You could create a soft Link to that folder to any new folder under your /home and call it whatever you like. ...


0

sudo works with a mechanism that is called setuid (Set User ID, or also called suid). If that bit is set on an executable file (like sudo), then the application is executed under the permissions of the user, who is the owner of that file (in case of sudo, the owner is the root user). That means, sudo is executed as root. So far so good. But, now nothing ...


2

The best practice is related to needs. for example If I want to keep my user data and i consider those data are much valuable then i'll make my home on different partition. here in your case, since you have only one empty partition to be assigned so you have to make a choose. What's most important for you, the users data or the services data ...


0

Try this one. I just removed the '/' from all the excludes. sudo rsync -avz --exclude="tmp" --exclude="sys" --exclude="lost+found" --exclude="mnt" --exclude="proc" --exclude="dev" --exclude="media" / /home/willc86/backup/


0

At here After I insert a CD I have to click the 'Show hidden icons' to get the Device Notifier. Another hickup is: How can I get the Plasma 5 Device Notifier to give me appropriate options for DVDs after upgrading from Kubuntu 14.10 to 15.04?


0

Once you're sucessfully logged on to Ubuntu. Open a Terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) followed by:- sudo gedit /boot/grub/grub.cfg Edit the line that looks like linux /boot/vmlinuz-x.x.x-xx-generic root=xxx\xyz ro xxx-options to linux /boot/vmlinuz-x.x.x-xx-generic root=xxx\xyz rw xxx-options This file is generated from the files present in /etc/grub.d and ...


0

Can't add a comment because of lack of reputation, but want to tell to those of you who have GPT disk when testing it with fdisk, use gdsik instead to get start sector and count proper offset. It helped me. fdisk -l gave me: Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System vm2080737.bak1 * 1 3901 31457279+ ee GPT ...


0

Try this Make script witch will umount sshfs drives when vpn is terminated. Make script in the folder /etc/network/if-down.d/ with execute permissions 755 # Check for specific interface if desired [ "$IFACE" != "ppp0" ] || exit 0 # Do something umount /path/drive When int ppp0 will go down command umount /path/drive will be executed Also you can make ...


0

Any chance that a kernel update has disabled the vbox guest additions? Do you tried reinstalling the guest additions?


2

Mount the iso by command line: sudo mount -o loop myIsoFile.iso /media/iso then you will know were you mounted it.


0

install unetbootin from ppa. ok i know the new version dosent support windows ntfs format... but i did it.trust me. format usb drive in fat32 format,then open unetbootin and only choose windows iso and your usb drive.butt dont start process.now when unetbootin is open go to disk app(gnome disk utility) and unmount & format your usb to ntfs. mount it ...


1

Try this : Your machine is now on : then a) pop slowly out and then slowly in sd-card b) type this into terminal sudo apt-get install --reinstall udev* then when finish then repeat with a) and then after this reboot your machine or shut completely down and boot up again without being online. (the latter two lines are meant as in case sd-card would ...


1

You can use kpartx to be able to use embeded partition in files. For example: sudo kpartx -a ubuntu-15.04.iso Will give you additional devices under /dev/mapper like /dev/mapper/loop0p1, ... that you can mount. This might not be needed in your case as to grow your partition, I suggest (do backup): dd if=/dev/zero bs=1M count=500 >> yourfile.ext4 ...


1

Your problem is not related to mounting points or permissions. You need to install ia32 library because Linux 64-bit adt bundle comes with a 32 bit adb. Try this: sudo apt-get install libc6-i386 lib32stdc++6 lib32gcc1 lib32ncurses5


4

First, the Common Internet File System (CIFS) is a network protocol, not a filesystem used on a hard disk. Thus, your attempt to mount the disk with CIFS was doomed to failure from the start. (You might use CIFS to access the same disk from another computer, but not locally.) Most Windows partitions use NTFS, which Ubuntu mounts using the NTFS-3g driver. ...


0

I guess you want to see it in your file manager. Then you have to mount it to "/media/<user_name>/<some_directory>". Or "/media/<some_directory>" for all users. In your case add to fstab /dev/sda8 /media/mount_folder ext3 defaults 0 0 You can also do it manually, same way as it is done by nautilus. sudo mkdir ...


0

Okay, it works just I as tought! Go to and copy C:/Users/Username/Appdata/Roaming/Mozilla/Firefox/Profiles/nameofprofile.default Copy your file you retrieved from Windows partition to /home/user/.mozzilla/firefox open profiles.ini and modify to something like: [General] StartWithLastProfile=1 [Profile0] Name=default IsRelative=1 Path=avjdkb26.default ...


0

To import your firefox bookmarks: Go to the bookmar menu/icon and select show all bookmars to open the bookmar manager. Select the import/backup option and Import the bookmarks, copy them to Ubuntu. Open firefox in your Ubuntu install and do the same except you select import now.


0

Maybe virus has corrupted your partition table. If you have Windows as second OS you can use Unformat for data recognition and recovery. After that you can delete partition and create the new one. If you want to monitor your partition from Ubuntu you could try this: http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk_Step_By_Step


1

Following the installation of the following, no problems were encountered: sudo apt-get -y install libmtpserver-dev mtp-server


0

As you can see /dev/sdb1 is mounted at /media/jviotti/CD8B-7D3E. Try the command in a terminal: sudo umount /dev/sdb1 -v sdb points your HDD and different partitions of HDD will be listed as different 'files'. In your case I guess there is only 1 partition i.e sdb1


0

Try this and see if it is of any help: While booting choose the option with Recovery mode Go to the option with Drop to root shell prompt and execute the following commands mount -o remount rw /


1

you can easily in simple method, just create another VDI hdd in your virtual machine and attach it to your machine, then boot your ubuntu, once you login you can see the icon of an external hdd on your unity launcher. click it and thus it's mounted now so you can easily copy or move whatever you want to it. This tricky method as you are using external hdd ...


1

You are right, fuse initiates the mount first, then initiates the ssh process. This causes a problem for you, since by default ssh reads ~/.ssh/ssh_config, ~/.ssh/known_config, ~/.ssh/id_* files from user home. This behavior can be changed: ~/.ssh/ssh_config is the default per-user configuration file. An alternative per-user configuration file can be ...


0

I found a way what worked for me! I changed the /etc/fstab to: //servername/sharename /media/sharename cifs credentials=/home/ubuntuusername/.smbcredentials,rw,nounix,iocharset=utf8,file_mode=0777,dir_mode=0777,sec=ntlm 0 0 Also I made my account sudoer by adding a line in /etc/sudoers %Group ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL


2

If you have gone and changed your uid and gid, go and change them back now before even going past this first part of this answer. Unless you really know what you're doing, you should NEVER go change your uid or gid just to mount a drive, as you can break other permissions in the computer and potentially lose access to your own home directory in the ...


0

find device path, LABEL, UUID and TYPE of block devices with help of command sudo blkid result will be like /dev/sda1: UUID="XXXX" TYPE="ntfs" /dev/sda5: UUID="XXXX-XXXX" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sda6: UUID="XXXX-XXXX" TYPE="swap" /dev/sda7: UUID="XXXX-XXXX" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sda8: UUID="XXXX-XXXX" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sdb1: LABEL="p" UUID="XXXX-XXXX" ...


0

If you are using windows 8 (or were) then this is a real bugger. When Windows shuts down, it hibernates its kernel space, effectively the stuff that interfaces with the computer's hardware, so it can boot quickly next time. If you still have it boot windows and open a command line. In there type: shutdown /s This will completely shut down the system. Note ...


0

Probably, your Kernel doesn't contain the nls_utf8.ko module. If it's your case, you will see similar entries in your dmesg output: [ 612.598233] CIFS VFS: CIFS mount error: iocharset utf8 not found [ 612.598547] CIFS VFS: cifs_mount failed w/return code = -79 To confirm it, you can run uname -a to get your current Kernel and search for the ...


1

i found a very easy answer for this problem, just type this in the terminal udisks --mount /dev/sda2 --mount-options umask=022 (mounts with exec) steam will accept the windows partition and start downloading/installing your game.


0

There is a workaround. In windows create the Steam Library on the Windows drive In linux create a new Steam Library on you linux partition. Close Steam and remove the files inside the Steam Library folder. Link your newly created Steam Library on linux to your windows Steam Library with: ln -s /path/to/windows/Steam_Library /path/to/linux/Steam_Library


2

I've solved the problem with what feels like a dirty hack. If anyone can provide a better answer, please share. Otherwise I am going to mark this as the correct answer eventually. Create an autostart launcher for the desktop that runs gsettings. Example as follows: $ cat /etc/xdg/autostart/gsettings-for-all-users.desktop [Desktop Entry] Type=Application ...


1

Try disabling hibernation completely by running powercfg /h off as administrator in windows. Happy that this solved the issue for you!


0

I have the same problem, and what I do is to "reboot" windows, and then choose ubuntu from the grub menu. Then I can mount windows partitions with no problem. My theory is that windows hibernates when you choose "shut down". Another one of those misleading/lying windows actions. Now I just never "shut down" windows, I always reboot into a linux distro, and ...


-1

Mount the swap partition with noauto option: /dev/mapper/vg-vgswap none swap sw,noauto 0 0 /dev/mapper/cryptswap1 none swap sw,noauto 0 0


0

Without further technical detail, there are only 2 recommendations to make: On the internal hard disk, where the software stores its data files, copy that particular directory to the external HDD, delete the internal directory and create a symbolic link to the external hard drive (take back-ups first!) dd the entire internal HDD onto the external one, boot ...


1

Simplest method I know and use upon every fresh install is: start up the live CD with the installer on it (Desktop version) mount the old home partition in the install session (via terminal or file manager) rename the user directory (sudo mv USER USER_old) unmount the home partition and do the install with manual disk setup: add the home partition as /home ...


1

The amount of loopbacks is a setting in modules.conf. It used to be /etc/modules.conf and before that /etc/conf.modules but looks like in 15.04 is is /etc/modules-load.d/modules.conf. You can add 64 loopbacks with options loop max_loop=64 It looks like 256 is a hard coded limit in loop.ko. From a redhat system: # modinfo loop ... parm: ...


0

This thing goes deeper. I believe the best practice is to keep internal drives mounted at /mnt, and external removables at /media. This post illustrates a difference in functioning, where /media blocked access to certain system and user processes, (because of the default limiting umask attached to any drive that is mounted) where as /mnt acted like the host ...


0

You can use sshfs for remote mounting using ssh with user and password Ubuntu-SSHFS Install sshfs package $ sudo apt-get install sshfs


1

eCryptfs doesn't encrypt an entire partition like LUKS/dm-crypt does, your home is stored (encrypted) in a regular folder, apparently somewhere on your sda1 root partition in your case. Making a regular backup of your home while you're logged in (and it's mounted/decrypted) would be a good method to migrate it to another location (keeping the backup copy ...


1

iOS 8 requires libimobiledevice-1.2, which is not available as packet for 14.04 imho. Instructions on how to install here


13

First, note there is a typo in mount your command. It should be: $ sudo mount /dev/sda2 /media/username Here /dev/sda2 is the device (in this case, a hard drive's partition) you want to access, and /media/username is your mountpoint, i.e., the location in the filesystem where you want to mount the device. To answer your questions: Yes, using cd is the ...


1

Try adding vboxsf to /etc/modules (check to see if it is already there first, though I have a feeling it is not) and see if that helps. Otherwise, a similar question has been asked over at askubuntu. See if any answers there help you at all: https://askubuntu.com/questions/252853/how-to-mount-a-virtualbox-shared-folder-at-startup Edit to try and answer ...



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