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Seems I'm not the only one with this problem, and all I got in the #Ubuntu IRC channel was "You can't expect it to be stable from the get go!" says everything about Ubuntu doesn't it?? But seriously, why release a OS if a vast majority cannot connect their External HDD's or devices? I have my music library on my external HDD and as of yet, can't listen to ...


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It shows that your /tmp is mounted as noexec, so try to mount it with exec option inorder to make your upgrade work. exec / noexec - Permit/Prevent the execution of binaries from the filesystem. Open nautilus with superuserdo permissions. sudo nautilus Then open the /etc/fstab file. change the below line(/tmp entry on fstab for mine looks like ...


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Just drag the folder or file you want to access, to the terminal, and you will have the location to access it in the terminal.


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Get hold of a PC running windows, download a program called SD Formatting, install and reformat the SD card, making sure the option is set to "ON", it will then be recognised on a Linux machine! without the read only option.


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See this question about how to free up space in your /dev/loop0 partition. Then, consider migrating your WUBI install to an ordinary system.


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I just found out that the -t option to mount can be used in conjunction with -a, such that sudo mount -a -t cifs does what I need. (sudo mount -a -t cifs -o remount works as well, for remounting after permission / password changes.)


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You're looking for the -t flag for mount. From man mount: -t, --types vfstype [...] More than one type may be specified in a comma separated list. The list of filesystem types can be prefixed with no to specify the filesystem types on which no action should be taken. (This can be meaningful with the -a option.) For example, the ...


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By default only devices mounted in "/media" will be shown in the sidebar. And whan there is no fstab entry those devices will be mounted in "/media". So change /mnt/extra_storage to /media/extra_storage and Nautilus will pick it up. There is also a dconf setting that can be set to prevent mounting:


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Take a look to RecoveryMode 8.1 The root partition is mounted read-only. To mount it read/write, enter the command mount -o remount,rw /


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If your device is always called /dev/sdd1 (but it probably isn't), all you need to do is add a line to /etc/fstab: /dev/sdd1 /media/mpdr1 ntfs defaults,users 0 0 Since the device name is actually likely to change, a better way would be to use the UUID of the drive. So, first use blkid to get the correct UUID and then, add this line to /etc/fstab ...


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mount - mount a filesystem -o, --options Options are specified with a -o flag followed by a comma separated string of options. remount Attempt to remount an already-mounted filesystem. This is commonly used to change the mount flags for a filesystem, especially to make a readonly filesystem writeable. It does not change device or mount point. The ...


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"Removable drives" probably refers to something like SATA drives that can be hot-plugged, like on a server, maybe eSATA as well. "Removable media" probably means more along the lines of USB devices. There is probably a difference between mounting a USB device and mounting a SATA device. USB drives are generally mounted automatically (optionally in this ...


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I faced a similar problem. Here is my workaround: Create folder /media/wd-elements Find out UUID of your external disk: sudo blkid Add following line to your /etc/fstab: UUID=<UUID> /media/wd-elements ntfs-3g defaults,soft,_netdev,users 0 0 Setup rule to mount your disk when it is plugged. link If anyone has a better solution, share it please.


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Debian and it's children, one of which is Ubuntu, use the RootSudo approach. As such, since only root can mount drives, your command should be: sudo mount -v /media/bakwas


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Just rebooting the Ipad is working. Look at the Rainer's commentary there : http://itsfoss.com/mount-iphone-ipad-ios-7-ubuntu-13-10/


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It looks like you're running into the problem described here. You should be able to mount that volume read/write by running: sudo apt-get install hfsprogs sudo mount -t hfsplus -o remount,force,rw /media/cr/FinnHard You'll be able to mount it again later on using: sudo mount -t hfsplus -o force,rw /dev/sdb2 /media/cr/FinnHard


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Add "user" to your mount options to allow any user to mount the partition. Your mount options in your image are just above the "Mount Point" label, on an unlabeled line starting "nosuid,... You also seem to have something inconsistent on the location of the mount. Did you want it under /mnt or under /media? The /etc/fstab file is the location for what ...


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The easiest way to do this is to add your NAS to your file dialog. From there you will be able to access your NAS directories. To do this you need to bookmark the directory in the NAS for the filemanager to remember the location. Browse to the directory in the file manager, then bookmark it: How to add custom links in the left pane of Nautilus? Now when ...


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I believe the problem in your case is that you are trying to mount a remote device before the network has finished coming up. You should add the _netdev option to /etc/fstab for the iSCSI device to make it wait to mount until the network is up.


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It sounds like your drive is damaged: [ 372.444424] end_request: I/O error, dev sdb, sector 250589039 Here are some things to try: Attach the drive to a Windows machine and run a checkdisk there. NTFS checks are probably better under Windows (this is an assumption). Run ntfsck. On Debian systems, /sbin/fsck.ntfs is a symlink to /bin/ntfsfix but this ...


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MTP mode wont work. It's an abstracted filesystem meaning Photorec (et al) don't have direct access. According to the Photorec website, you'll need to throw the phone into Mass Storage mode. Once you've done that, it should see the drive correctly. I'm not sure what sort of recovery you're doing here. If the screen is broken and you're stuck in MTP mode, ...


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I think the problem is that unlike $UID, $GID is not a bash built-in variable. Instead, you may be able to use $(id -g) i.e. sudo mount -t vboxsf -o uid=$UID,gid=$(id -g) shared ~/host or (for consistency) sudo mount -t vboxsf -o uid=$(id -u),gid=$(id -g) shared ~/host


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First, I highly advise against using ntfs on linux this way. Second, you can not change ownership or permissions with mount --bind You can try mounting the partition with the permissions option, then the usual commands chown and chmod should work. If that does not work, see https://www.tuxera.com/community/ntfs-3g-manual/#7


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Maybe open files are preventing the unmounting process. I'm not sure if that's the correct behavior. I would expect mount will show the network share still mounted. Run lsof +D /mnt/storageHDD/MySQL/data/netMNT to list the open files in your mountpoint, then you can try to kill the associated process.


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That is not a Partition problem. It just means that Windows 8 was closed in a unsafe way (Power down while using Windows, You hibernated or suspended the Windows 8 session or any other option than shutting down Windows the normal way). In Windows 8, Microsoft introduced a "new" feature when shutting down that it actually not shutdown the PC but hibernated ...


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After some additonal testing I found the solution myself: kpartx sudo kpartx -a raspberry-backup-2014-04-10.img This command created /dev/mapper/loop0p1 and /dev/mapper/loop0p2. Afterwards these partitions can be mounted straight forward: sudo mount -o rw -t ext4 /dev/mapper/loop0p2 mount_target/


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Dealing with an image of a whole disk with multiple partitions is quite tricky. Linux was not designed to read a partition table out of a regular file, even when attached to a loopback device, so you must carefully identify the offsets of the partitions and pass them in to the mount command. The preferable way would be to create separate images of each ...


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Solution: Changed my fstab to: //server/share /media/share cifs username=msusername,password=mspassword,uid=1000,gid=1000 0 0


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"mount the volume read-only with the 'ro' mount option." read only means you can extract the files from it. So why not follow that advice if all you want is to extract the files? Command would be something like this: sudo mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sdb1 /media/dugi/Store -o ro,noatime (mind the ro for readonly and none of the options in -o can have spaces ...


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You did not update the uuid for your swap partition, and instead of updating the uuid for the other one, you added a duplicate entry.


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From blkid, you can see that the UUIDs have changed. Perhaps this occurred after you re-partitioned? For example, blkid shows /dev/sdb8: UUID="179768ad-16ec-4c94-b9a1-cf1d12736dbc" TYPE="swap" i.e. the swap partition is now 179768ad-16ec-4c94-b9a1-cf1d12736dbc. Make a backup, then change the relevant line in /etc/fstab from ...


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You should use a bind mount with the user/owner option. A bind mount does not take uid or gid. The bind mount will apply the permissions from the user or owner directory to the mount. The mount point should be owned by root. The user directory should be set up as desired. Add this line to /etc/fstab: /media/D/Leinardo/Documents Documents none bind,user ...


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You need to end all --plugin parts with -- so forexample --plugin rdpdr --data disk:Transfer:/home/apl03/Transfer becomes --plugin rdpdr --data disk:Transfer:/home/apl03/Transfer -- see more here https://github.com/FreeRDP/FreeRDP/wiki/Plugins


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After googling and asking here and there, I found the answer. I'm using "sec=ntlmssp" instead of "sec=ntlvm2" //charles.codex/Documents/ /mnt/charles cifs user,iocharset=utf8,file_mode=0777,dir_mode=0777,rw,gid=1000,nounix,sec=ntlmssp,credentials=/root/credentials/charles 0 0 This was commented at Problem with mount using option "sec=ntlmv2"


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I also had the same screen when I put it in the USB 2.0 but when I plugged it into the USB 3.0 port then it would be detected and you can see it with lsusb.


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To resize/move partitions, the best way is to boot from LiveCD/LiveUSB. Then use Gparted to manage partitions. You might need to install it, so do sudo apt-get install gparted. There is a way to unmount your root partition on running system but I advise you not to do it because it is risky for your data.


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You can't unmount it, because it's being used. From the error message, /dev/sda1 is the location of your root directory /. Instead, create a gparted live CD, then boot from that. Then, you should be able to resize the (now-unused) root partition. Make sure you back everything up before resizing!


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If Rockbox Utility fails to detect the mount point of your iPod, it is no big deal. I had the exact same issue with my Sansa Clip Zip. Simply: Mount the iPod with your file manager (e.g. Thunar) In Configuration > Select your audio player select the appropriate mount point In Configuration > Select your audio player select iPod Video 5th gen Do ...


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I found it out! It is very simple. Start the laptop under Windows 7. Use the Intel provided tool to unmark the RAID error on the one drive. Boot Ubuntu from USB again and it is done. The whole volume will be automounted. And the error message ERROR: isw: wrong number of devices in RAID set "isw_iffifahhi_Volume0" [1/2] on /dev/sdb * Group superset ...


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I found the answer to my problem. The solution was only to make a "visible" directory locally by : ln -s .gvfs mounted # on my local home folder Hope this will help others. Laurent


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None of the recommendations here mention that in a manual partitioning set up one MUST include at least 35mb IEF boot partition for the grub and other boot data to go into. I didn't know this and wonder why my 2tb hard drive would not boot up after installation. Luckily when I went to reinstall and selected the option to "Erase and reinstall" on ubuntu ...


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follow below steps : find device (50GB WD) device file i.e. /dev/sdx1 where x is a,b,c,d,... type command in terminal $ fdisk -l (find your device mount path) Now need to mount on directory $ mount /dev/sdx1 /mnt (here i want to mount my drive at /mnt But you can specified your location y replace it) on successful it will mounted on /mnt. AS you ...


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This is coming rather late, but I believe options are comma separated. Try sudo mount.cifs //192.168.0.13/Data /mnt/TC -o user=htpc,pass=xxxx,sec=ntlm with lower case and the comma.


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You can remount it rw: umount /dev/sdc2 udisks --mount /dev/sdc2 --mount-options rw As for why it is being mounted ro, you should consult the syslog.


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NTFS/FAT formatted partitions do not follow linux permission system and you'll have to adjust the permissions from the mount options (in fstab if you configured it to mount it automatically). Partition type can be check sudo blkid -c /dev/null


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Running Kubuntu saucy, adding an entry to /etc/fstab works for me. According to the udisks2 docs, fstab is respected as long as no mount options violate system security policies. The docs also mention triggering a user authorization request in cases that do break security policy, however, I didn't need to worry about it in my case so I don't cover it here. ...


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Link to filesystem One way would be to make a link to the filesystem, which should be in /media/directoryName. Maybe you got to switch the 'write-bit' of the directory on. This usually should work. A problem could be, if you can't make a link to the filesystem, read $ man ln That works when I use it. ^vote me up^


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I fixed adding uid, gid and allow_another options for sshfs. Like this: sshfs -o uid=33,gid=33,allow_another chachan@192.168.56.1:/home/chachan/workspace/magento /home/chachan/workspace I also added (uncomment) user_allow_other option to /etc/fuse.conf and it's working smoothly :)


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I found this paper which analyzes the security of FileVault 2 and the authors wrote this library which allows access to CoreStorage partitions via fuse. Here's how to mount encrypted partitions, but I haven't tried it yet. They also mention on the front page that non-encrypted partition support is still being worked on.



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