New answers tagged

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Is it possible that shutting down and then unplugging my external hard drive could have broken a path? No. And if it did it would not kill the contents of the disk. I have noticed that Ubuntu shuts down almost instantly ... We do not probe for an update as Windows does. whereas Windows takes much longer and often pauses on closing 1 application ...


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From the Mount during login instead of boot section of the wiki link you posted, perhaps try adding this to /etc/fstab: //servername/sharename /media/windowsshare cifs noauto,credentials=/home/ubuntuusername/.smbpasswd 0 0 And this to your /etc/rc.local file: mount /media/windowsshare exit 0


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I could solve this by removing writing right from the dummy mount point folder. This way, copying files fails if mounting was not successful.


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open a Nautilus window click Go in the menu, or alternatively press Ctrl+L enter smb://remote_host/share_name Go to Bookmarks and click add


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Using the System Menu > Preferences > Personal > File Management Here you have multiple option to select.


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In addition to the existing answers, you may have non-standard/common compatibility and performance use cases that benefit from different partitions. You may want to share data with another operating system such as Windows and need to use a filesystem that both Linux and supports. You may have specialist use cases that allow you to have different tunings (...


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I found the solution myself and I want to share it with you: In the past, I entered my known hosts only in the /etc/hosts file. After entering the same into /etc/hosts.allow file everything works fine.


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The exfat file system is not installed by default. sudo apt-get install exfat-fuse exfat-utils Reboot and plug had back in.


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Read the error message: mount: unknown filesystem type 'exfat'. On your system, the file /proc/filesystems has a list of all the filesystem types your system supports (without extra effort). Or, read man mount. You probably want "-t vfat"


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Yes, with mount --bind you can make the same content (especially directories) appear in the file system twice. For a very comprehensive article about this please see What is a bind mount? on unix.stackexchange.com Most important points: Bind mounts are "just" an alternate way of viewing the contents of the file system. They may cross filesystem ...


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Giving the mount point of your SD card partition the correct ownership should do the trick. If you want the user who mounted the SD card to still have ownership permissions, you could change the group of /media/user/name/ and all of the files and folders it contains to www-data with: chgrp -R www-data /media/user1/Núbia Ensure that all of those files and ...


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I managed to adapt this answer from linuxquestions.org to get a working solution: http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/ubuntu-63/how-to-connect-to-windows-share-without-password-4175580487/ The answer from linuxquestions.org suggests to add the following two options to the mount: nounix,sec=ntlm Using these two options plus the option setting an empty ...


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udisksctl mount -b /dev/yourblockdevice Worked for me. Adapted from http://superuser.com/questions/638225/manually-trigger-automount-in-debian-based-linux


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Since Ubuntu 12.04, ejecting a USB drive or partition has the same effect as "Safely Remove" (with Nautilus). You can verify this with some USB devices that have some kind of power indicator on them. The device will sync, unmount if not busy, and then power down, i.e., the power/status light will turn off. To remount or reuse a powered down USB device, ...


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just did from the part - "Don't throw in the towel" i have Optiarc DVD RW AD-7530B (NX02) sudo add-apt-repository ppa:brandonsnider/cdrtools sudo apt update there were 3 packages so i did: sudo apt-get dist-upgrade sudo apt install cdrecord mkisofs restart thats all, worked for me, made my day, thanks


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For some reasons, this device is removed suddenly by kernel or USB controller in non clean way, So it leaves those /dev nodes artifact. It's a USB2 device! As I see the spec data of SanDisk Cruzer Blade.: Capacity 128 GB 64 GB 32 GB 16 GB 8 GB 4 GB Generation USB 2.0 USB 2.0 USB 2.0 USB 2.0 USB 2.0 USB 2.0 It should be a USB2 ...


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its normal for quotacheck to give these errors when reading an empty quota file for the first time. This should go away on checking after subsequent remounts.


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Not all DVDs are really udf, if the -t udf doesn't work (wrong superblock) try: sudo mount -t iso9660 /dev/sr0 /cdrom that is after sudo mkdir /cdrom so the /cdrom directory exists. ~$ sudo mount -t udf /dev/sr0 /cdrom mount: block device /dev/sr0 is write-protected, mounting read-only mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/sr0, ...


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The main problem is that the virtual disk you have created is not formatted, it is just a raw disk without a partition table. Another issue is that you selected the format qcow2 and created an .img file. You have to execute this command : qemu-img create -f qcow2 ubuntu.qcow2 20G. Download the latest stable version of GParted Live | Direct download link ->...


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this seems to be a bug in the system-config-lvm tool. use the command line with lvextend -L +nnG /device resizet2fs /devic it works, even if the partition is the live /


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Finally I have been able to find the cause of the problem. My laptop model is Lenovo B50. Its ethernet card is r8168. However lenovo provides drivers for r8168 for Ubuntu which works only upto Ubuntu 12.04 and I have Ubuntu 16.04. As such not only my dvd drive but also ether port is not working, quite frustrating. Now my only option is to use external usb ...


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Go to Wubi installation folder C:\ubuntu\install open file wubildr-disk.cfg The content is: loopback loop0 /ubuntu/disks/root.disk set root=(loop0) search --set=diskroot -f -n /ubuntu/disks/root.disk probe --set=diskuuid -u $diskroot linux /vmlinuz root=UUID=$diskuuid loop=/ubuntu/disks/root.disk preseed/file=/ubuntu/install/preseed.cfg wubi-diskimage ...


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I have temporary solution, try mounting with sudo mount /dev/... /mnt/tothisdir Or use "Disk" to mount or any other but not nautilus


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Recent Windows versions (most likely starting with Windows 7) create a hidden boot partition by default and Linux installers seem not to be able to handle it correctly. Is this your case? In Windows, run diskmgmt.msc. Your primary disk starts with a System Reserved partition of size 100–200 MB. Click on the disk’s grey field in the left and open Properties....


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If I were to guess, you have a separate partition for /boot. That's not unusual, the installer does that when using LVM. First mount /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-root at /mnt, and then mount /dev/sda2 at /mnt/boot.


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I went mad on 14.04. the credential= option was not mounting the share in fstab although I could mount it "by hand" in the cli. Issue was that the "cifs-utils" package was not installed... sudo apt-get install cifs-utils and everything was fine...


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I had the same problem. There's some info on the Ubuntu Community Help Wiki here suggesting it is intentional behaviour by Ubuntu 16: Under NFSv3 (type nfs) the _netdev option will tell the system to wait to mount until the network is available. With a type of nfs4 this option is ignored, but can be used with mount -O _netdev in scripts later. Currently ...


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/dev/sda1/ext4 can not exist. The device name must be only /dev/sda1.


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The file /usr/local/bin/mkyaffs2image doesn't exist, just like the error message is telling you. Check whether this is true by using ls : ls /usr/local/bin/mkyaffs2image If you get a "No such file or directory" error, then the file really doesn't exist. The sudo chmod command that you're using is trying to change the permissions of the two files /usr/...


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This option appears to have been dropped. The Ubuntu manpage for fstab contains this text if you select 14.04 LTS at the top: The mountall(8) program that mounts filesystem during boot also recognises additional options that the ordinary mount(8) tool does not. These are: ``bootwait'' which can be applied to remote filesystems mounted outside ...


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This is a filesystem problem. See the answer here and check the problems by sudo fsck.vfat /dev/... if your SD card is FAT32.


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I had put my Windows account on hibernate and then upon restarting the system, i got an exact same error for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. I just went back to windows and shut it down and came back to linux and it signed it easily. I did try it 2 more times the error was repeatable so i now know that when Windows had been mounted in the boot, Linux can't enter the boot ...


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Your user does not have access to the correct groups which on a clean Xenial Xerus installation looks like the following on my system: andrew@athens:~$ groups andrew adm cdrom sudo dip plugdev lpadmin sambashare vboxsf You can safely ignore both andrew and vboxfs which relate to my own username and VirtualBox Filesystem membership respectively. You can ...


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thanks from Nate Curry this might works good 10.10.10.10:6789:/ /mnt/ceph ceph name=admin,secretfile=/etc/ceph/secret.key,noatime,_netdev 0 2 but in my situation with Ubuntu 12.04 and kernel v3.2, _netdev doesn't work and I had to add a script at /etc/network/if-up.d/fstab that contain this code: #!bin/sh mount -a


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Consider changing the partition to ext4; if your system is all Ubuntu there is no reason to put up with the overhead associated with using an ntfs file system. Here are the steps I went through to convert mine. 1) copy data from original partition 2) gparted: unmount partition 3) gparted: format to ext4 4) gparted: label the partition ...


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Thanks to @chtaylor, I was originally able to resolve this by removing the sgrp attribute from all entries in pam_mount.conf.xml. Later I realized that the sgrp attribute works only if the group is user's primary group. So changing sgrp="residents" to sgrp="domain users" made the volumes available for me again because domain users is by default the primary ...


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What I see in the output of lsblk and df The two key points are these two lines: ├─sdd1 8:49 0 457.9G 0 part / └─sdd5 8:53 0 7.9G 0 part [SWAP] / tells us that 457.9 G disk partition contains your currently used Ubuntu - / designates root folder, much like C:\ on Windows. [SWAP] tells us it's the partition for your virtual memory ( which is ...


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In ubuntu (and in linux in general) Computer or MyComputer is a Windows-like designation for /. / is the root of your Ubuntu filesystem. Just like MyComputer is the root of your Windows PC. In linux everything is interpreted as a file or folder, even the hardware parts. Hardware is located in /dev. Harddisks looks like /dev/sda , dev/sdb , etc. 67GB ...


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Selected recovery from grub menu. Selected root shell. Remounted it in write mode mount -w -o remount / Edited fstab nano /etc/fstab Saved it and restated and it is working fine now.


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Login as a guest user. Then look at the contents of /etc/fstab and delete the line with the mountpoint '/home' in it. You can do this by opening a terminal enter the command: sudo nano /etc/fstab Save the file. Then reboot and see if you can login. I don't know what you already tried to fix it but this could work. At the moment I can't test if you can ...


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You're missing the -f option. It also looks like vdfuse needs to be told what the type of file it is. The command should be: vdfuse -r -t VHD -f "/media/mike/DATA/VM-VHD/SGOS.vhd" ~/Test The -f specifies the file that you're mounting. The -t means what type, since you're using VHD, that is what is specified. Also make sure that you uncomment the line ...


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Unless overridden by mount options GID= or UID= the owner and permissions of the mount point upon mounting become those of the filesystem tree being mounted. So if /dev/sdb1 contains an ext4 filesystem (say a backup) owned by user then user will become the owner of the mount point upon successful mount. Starting off we have an empty folder 'backup' to ...


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Best to use absolute paths so you don't change again things you need to stay how they are. So the below commands will make your old home directory readable for you. # this makes only the home directory in the old drive owned by you sudo chown -R mickey:mickey /media/f806aa57-553c-43bc-8338-37851dc128ad/home So now that you have done this I assume you want ...


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Add your /dev/sda6 to your /etc/fstab and it will be automatically mounted during start up. Find out your UUID of the partition: sudo blkid /dev/sda6 Then add this line below the #/home was on /dev/sda6 during installation UID=inserthereUUID /home ext4 defaults 0 0 you can try if it worked if you unmount it manually and then type in ...


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Well, being not very experienced in ubuntu touch, android, linux, armhf stuff, I wasn't able to do it right and straightforward way. Perhaps hacking boot.img could help but I'm not ready for this. The only workaround I was able to imagine is mounting /lib/modules/3.4.0-5-flo to different new loop device. It works though. cd /userdata dd bs=1M count=100 if=/...


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/, which is the base directory of the Linux filesystem and is normally where the partition on which you installed Ubuntu is mounted, was changed to be the mountpoint of sdb1. Because of this, files critical to Linux suddenly disappeared, causing your computer to freeze. All your files are still there, but since the drive that / was pointing to suddenly ...


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You could use a script similar to this one #!/bin/bash mount | grep /dev/sda5 || gksu mount /dev/sda5 /path || zenity --error --text="Failed to mount" ln -s -f "path1" "path2" || zenity --error --text="Failed to make link" mount get list of mounted nodes | grep /dev/... filter previous output of looking only for target device || gksu mount /dev/sda5 /...


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It seems that your hard disk is on the way to die. Don't try anything, take it to a professional to recover the still readable data from it!


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Hmm, I can't answer you completly why this happens. But I can tell you that you are not using the right folder for what you are doing. These folders are used by the systems automatically e.g. the /media/ folder is used for automatic mounts of CDROMs etc. I would recommend you using only your /home/user/ for such things. E.g. create a /home/user/Multimedia ...


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There is an interesting bug feature in ubuntu live-CDs(USBs): they require you to use root if you want to modify files on the hard drive. The joke is that root on live-CDs doesn't have a password! Therefore: SOLUTION: sudo lubuntu_default_filemanager Press Enter Perform rescue operations.



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