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If you don't want to interfere with your filemanager (nautilus, konquerer, gnome, etc) 's control over mounting and unmounting your device, I suggest not going the udev route. Instead, use udisks-glue if your system uses udisks (almost all do). After installing, just create a config file ~/.udisks-glue.conf in your home directory like this. My following ...


0

So you don't mind sudo mount from a terminal, but you want your non-admin user(s) to have RW access? Do once: sudo mkdir /media/cifs_temp chmod a+rwx /media/cifs_temp then use a slightly modified version of your mount command: sudo mount -t cifs //192.168.0.2/NAME /media/cifs_temp -o username=USERNAME,password=PASSWORD and that should do it!


0

It's hard to guess what you're trying to do and in what order... So you have a PC hooked up to a disk array, and your "/" (root partition) is full and you're trying to move it to another partition... So far I understand. Which utilities are you using? "cp"? Can you boot with a gparted live CD and extend the partition in there???


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Boot to Windows and run a: CHKDSK /F X: where X: is the drive letter under Windows... If that doesn't help, right-click on Computer, properties, advanced, swap file, re-create Windows swap file.... (Ubuntu question, Windows solution) and I would convertntfs the drive.... FAT just has too many problems. It's Windows95 technology after all... :-(


1

Try this. Just press Ctrl+Alt+T on your keyboard to open Terminal. When it opens, run the command(s) below: sudo gedit /usr/share/polkit-1/actions/org.freedesktop.udisks2.policy When it opens look for <allow_active>auth_admin_keep</allow_active> and change it to <allow_active>yes</allow_active>


0

When Gparted tried to resize the Windows partition (I understood that it is the partition you talk about) probably it gone in some trouble and the NTFS is now on a "broken" state that needs you to restart it using Windows to correct the situation. On that scenario, mount is not going to work until you start the partition with Windows to correct it, as a ...


0

I found a solution to my question on my own. SOLUTION Wrote in terminal: sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdXY where sdXY is the partition I needed to mount, in my case - DATA partition. With this I can hibernate windows and still be able to use the DATA partition on lubuntu without losing the hibernated data on windows, which is on windows system partition.


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If you're not doing this from the root user (which I presume you aren't), you need to use sudo. It should be as simple as sudo mount /dev/xvdb1 /var/www


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You can't use NTFS for Unix system files and directories. NTFS has very different semantics of owner/permission; an awful lot of system files in /var/ depend on the exact unix semantics. Sadly, moving folders and file from /var destroyed the information of user/group/permissions... The problem you have now is similar to this: How to recover after all files ...


0

I had the same issue after duplicating an HFS+ partition so I though I might share my solution. I solved it by running a Disk repair from Mac Os Disk Utility application. You can run it from a Macos install or the Recovery DVD.


-1

Is your disk being mounted on startup automatically? make sure the disk mounts itself by editing the entry in /etc/fstab. or try reconfiguring the package using sudo dpkg-reconfigure gdm you may have to Install this package if system doesn't find it at all. Good Luck.


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As proposed by @AlaaAli, I just needed to add user to the option of the mount in the etc/fstab: 192.168.1.100:/volume1/Downloads /home/pierre/Downloads_NAS nfs rsize=8192,wsize=8192,timeo=14,intr,user Now the partition is automatically mounted when needed.


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Those messages can be normal - http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c02270753&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en http://serverfault.com/questions/613249/buffer-i-o-error-on-device-sata-drive to impending drive failure (unlikely). smartmontools is required to determine the health of the drive and your drives passed. smartctl -H /dev/sda ...


2

The default is just a directory in the root filesystem. That's fine but I have a desktop, a ton of RAM and reboot very infrequently... Which is the perfect description of somebody who could be using RAM instead of SSD for caching temporary stuff... So mine is mounted as a tmpfs RAMdisk, defined in fstab as: tmpfs /tmp tmpfs ...


0

Typically, this buffer issues can be indicative of a pending HDD failure. However, it is best to test the drive and verify and see where exactly the error lay. Please run e2fsck -fv /dev/sdX. If it runs without error, then there must be something else wrong. If it has any errors or mentions moving sectors, backup immediately and prepare to replace the drive. ...


0

Citation sudo apt-get install cryptsetup # Installs the tools we need to deal with encrypted partitions sudo modprobe dm-crypt # Inserts a module we need sudo cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda2 cheer # Unlocks the partition sda2 and names it cheer Enter LUKS passphrase: key slot 0 unlocked. Command successful. # # Now that we ...


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I believe I've found the right way to deal with this in Arch Wiki. Use comment=systemd.automount option.


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There are lots of ways to copy over your data, even if your data folders are encrypted. All you have to do is boot the old drive and copy the data you want to copy onto external media and back to the new media. You could also try using the included "backup" utility which works very well in my experience. Having said all of that, had you asked me before you ...


0

5-10 minutes seems exceedingly slow! Do you have USB Legacy support turned on in your BIOS? (If yes, turn off!) Can you provide the output for: fdisk -l df --human


1

You have to mount the LVM partition. It can be confusing if the physical volumes and/or logical volumes have the same name ... Scan your system for LVM volumes and identify in the output the volume sudo vgscan you will see something like Found volume group "fedora" using metadata type lvm2 You should see two volume groups activate the (old) ...


1

Was that disk part of a RAID volume??? Can you also provide the output of: sudo fdisk -l (sorry, but my "reputation" from stack exchange apparently doesn't transfer here in AskUbuntu, so I cannot add this as a comment)


0

sec=ntlm worked for me too... I had load of problems with this from the CLI and fstab but it worked fine from the GUI (on Fedora 20) to a home NAS and to rule out things like complex passwords I created a user with a simple username and password and then used the CLI command mount.cifs to test with. I kept getting permission denied (13) all the time so ...


0

I have the same MyCloud. Its pretty simple if you have an idea of what you are doing. Log into the MyCloud management console. Assign a STATIC IP Address. Enable NFS service in MYCloud. On ubuntu client open Terminal sudo apt-get install nfs-common Close Terminal Open Nautilus and click 'connect to server'. Shown in picture below on bottom left. ...


0

Thanks for your replies. I wanted to auto-mount my D: drive at startup. What I did, was found the UUID of my drive by checking its properties. Next, I added this command to gnome-session-properties (press Alt+F2 and search) - udisksctl mount --block-device /dev/disk/by-uuid/<place_disk_UUID_here> Where I placed my disk's UUID at the end as asked. ...


0

It seems that for some reason the installer chose to partition the disk using the msdos partition table instead of GPT, and that limits its size to 2 TB. Your best bet is to reformat the drive using GPT and then reinstall. You can do this with gparted, or with parted using the mklabel command.


0

You can use autofs for doing some sort of it. autofs will only mount a certain path if you access it. Therefore you could configure Rhythmbox do scan your library on that path. It is not exactly what you said but it fits. Other even simpler option could be mount your Windows partition on boot time (I would go with it because it is the easiest way but I ...


0

To use that free space, you first must create a partition. To create a partition in the free space, either use gparted to create the partition or the disk utility, then format. Be careful to not destroy your data, make a backup first.


1

This looks a little old, so I'm not sure if you've already found an answer, but I've recently solved a similar issue. This problem is compounded by multiple issues: The new files browser always pulls information about the various filesystems that are available to it - meaning if you have 5 mounted shares, whether they are SSH, CIFS, or NFS and are visible ...


0

After remounting the device, it worked. I'm not sure why it didn't work earlier and put it down to me making a mistake initially.


1

SFS is the Windows dynamic partitioning format that is proprietary to Microsoft. I never used that even when I used Windows, but it used to default to that format rather than the more standard fixed NTFS. I think you could convert if you want, or redo it if it's convenient. More information is available here.


0

i'm a Kubutu User, my problem was related to this error when try to use iFuse: GNUTLS ERROR: A TLS packet with unexpected length was received. To solve this, i did the following: Open Konsole type this: usbmuxd try to run iFuse with sudo: sudo ifuse /media/iPhone/ --root Now open Dolphin with kdesudo as follows: kdesudo dolphin Navigate to ...


0

If you only need to read data from that volume, you can just run mount -t "ntfs" -o "ro,uhelper=udisks2,nodev,nosuid,uid=1000,gid=1000,dmask=0077,fmask=0177" "/dev/sda3" "/media/maan/E6B86A3CB86A0AFF"' or reboot to Windows, shutdown Windows, start Ubuntu again


1

When i had resized my ROOT volume and copied my Home files to my HOME volume, the 'rm' not erased my encrypted files. I just boot my system with a live CD, mounted my /root volume and use 'rm -f' to erase all files inside the home folder in /root.Thus, the hidden folder .encrptfs was deleted.


0

The fstab entry looks fine. But since you have entry in the fstab, root will try to mount the partition while booting. So root user should have permission in the folder /media/storage So change the ownership of the folder by giving the following command sudo chown root:root /media/storage and then give the permission to every user who want to access it ...


0

Its simple, plug in the drive. goto 'disks' select the correct disk in the left column. click the gear icon select 'edit mount options' turn 'off' check both 'mount at startup' and 'show user interface' Thats it!


0

The following link is a very good answer on having /home on a separate partition, it also works for having /home on a separate drive. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Partitioning/Home/Moving So I would do a fresh install on the SSD, then using the link above, tell it to use /home on the HDD. You will have to reinstall your programmes but they will pick ...


1

To mount a partition at startup for all users, we need an entry in the fstab file. What is happening presently is, the HDD is getting mounted for the user who logs in which gives access permissions to only that user. By adding an entry in the fstab, the partition will be mounted by root with access to all users. this r/w access can be controlled later on. ...


0

Do sudo vi /etc/rc.local add this line: mount -a save file and reboot NOTE: 14.10 is using an implementation of systemd to enable/start all its services... I don't think its working quite right yet. The NFS mount is failing because networking has not yet started during boot. Adding "mount -a" to your /etc/rc.local file is a work-around that I'm ...


1

You are trying to mount whole hard disk drive instead of partition on it. Try mounting /dev/sdc1 instead of /dev/sdc.


0

Putting the line in /etc/rc.local should do the trick.


0

As far as I know this will be impossible USB devices are mounted with their name so you need to alter the name of the device. Test with 2 different pendrives: Open disks from dash. 4,1 Gb Cruzer, Renaming to "usbdisk". Click the cogwheel in the middle (below the orange volume). 16.1 Gb, BSix, Renaming to "usbdisk". The Cruzer is now mounted ...


2

You can create a loopback device to a file and do it that way # create a 100M file in /opt dd if=/dev/zero of=/opt/dev0-backstore bs=1M count=100 # create the loopback block device # where 7 is the major number of loop device driver, grep loop /proc/devices mknod /dev/fake-dev0 b 7 200 losetup /dev/fake-dev0 /opt/dev0-backstore Make a little script ...


0

I am not sure if that helps but have you tried to mount it via sshfs yet? At least in my setup if the remotely mounted drive becomes unavailable, I don't experience any freezes whatsoever. I can't write to the remote drive and applications complain that the location they want to access is not available but that's really all that happens.


2

This problem has been plaguing me also; Using 14.04 and plugging in an external 1Tb Seagate drive. From my search on the web, it would appear the culprit is poor support for NTFS under linux Additionally, one of possible the culprits may be updatedb.mlocate which rightly or wrongly assumes that the your external drive needs to fully scanned as well, pushing ...


2

Not tested, but I would do it in this way if the SSD is at least the same size or bigger than HDD: Let's name the SSD as /dev/sda and the HDD as /dev/sdb for simplicity. Steps: Plug in the SSD and the HDD and boot a live Ubuntu from a bootable media (CD-ROM, pendrive) issue this command in a terminal: sudo dd if=/dev/sdb of=/dev/sda when finished, ...


-1

first, you should partition your ssd using the existing system (fdisd) Do not create filesystems on the newly created partitions, just use dd to copy the existing partitions to the partitions on the ssd. for example: dd if=/dev/sda1 of=dev/sdb1 Fstab should be updated as wel to point to the new partitions. and I would suggest to keep /var on your hdd if ...


3

Since 7f83f0bf-31b0-4977-97ed-a40d6c8c0c9a is the root partition, mount only it on /, so your fstab will look like this: UUID=7f83f0bf-31b0-4977-97ed-a40d6c8c0c9a / ext4 errors=remount-ro 0 1 UUID=4e8e58d8-ef0b-4ebd-8403-8fc81d3121f1 swap Ubuntu uses errors=remount-ro for / by default, and it is helpful in keeping the system running, but ...


0

To obtain the UUID of the drive, use the following command: blkid Use the UUID of the drive in fstab instead of /dev/sdX. The UUID is static and should remain the same even when the device name changes.


0

Or just execute the following command: $ sudo dmsetup ls --tree which will show how your block devices are stacked.


0

There have been some people using Mac OSX that have had similar problems (see here and here). The solution that works for many of them (including me) was to just reformat the drive. Since your drive only stays mounted for a short time you will have to do the reformatting quickly. You can do this with a tool such as gparted, but be careful you can lose data ...



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