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I saw a suggestion elsewhere about using KDE partition manager to recreate the existing filesystem on a usb stick, tried that on mine as I was not able to automount. It erases the drive but now it works! I also had to go into system settings and check the boxes for automount, but that was only accessible after the filesystem recreate.


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You have to remove the user from the group plugdev


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due to low points, I cant comment, but I think, mount command is to mount a file-system, which on a blank disk, doesn't exist. ... I would probably edit out that bit giving up the mac address of computers on your local network. Youll need to write a File system, to be able to mount it.


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I found this thread because I was having the same issue. This may not work for everyone, but it did for me. (I made a folder in home called /virtualdrive/Drive0) Also, I had the problem with a different game, but I think it applies. Mount iso # 1 sudo mount -o loop AOMG_D1.iso ~/virtualdrive/Drive0 Run game installer, hit install. It loads to 32% or ...


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If you run across this problem and are using the 3.13.0-59 kernel, that kernel is your problem. https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1479093 The issue has been fixed with the 3.13.0-61 kernel. If you do not have access to that kernel, yet, you can run steam using strace -f -o/dev/null steam from the command line and your library will show ...


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Basically there are two stages to this. decrypting mounting the Logical volumes Assuming your drive is on sda5 (which is the Ubuntu default AFAIK but might be different) sudo cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda5 luks You are then promted for your password. Than do the LVM stuff sudo pvscan && sudo vgscan && sudo vgchange -a y Use lsblk ...


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About a year with no answer, so I'll answer it. Looks like removing sec=ntlm from the fstab entry fixed it.


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when you shutting down window's 8.1 instead of shutting down through the menu panel, shut it down using force command to do this Press windows button and R key when you are in window's 8.1. when the run prompt up type in that :- shutdown -s -f -t 00 comment: -s for shutdown, -r for reboot use whichever you required. And press enter And when you reboot ...


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Your USB drive is formatted as an NTFS (i.e. windows) volume. mount assumes the files are owned by some windows user. You don't have a user mapping file (see man ntfs-3g, man ntfs-3g.usermap), so mount figures there's no point in managing the ownership and permissions, so it just sets them to whatever you tell it to (or whatever the default is). If you pass ...


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When you mount the USB drives you can specify the owner and the group with options uid and gid. For example: $ sudo mount -o uid=1000,gid=1000 /dev/sdX /path/to/mountpoint If you want to change permissions you can add the umask option too: $ sudo mount -o uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=022 /dev/sdX /path/to/mountpoint umask=022 will set the Owner to read, ...


0

I had the same problem today; "all of a sudden" my 14.04 wanted my password for "everything"; including (un)mount of USB sticks. I figured that I installed openssh-server in the morning. After removing it, everything is back to normal; I can insert a USB stick; and it is mounted without asking for a password. Strange. Just tried to repro; installed ...


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OK, thanks to several folks on this and other forums, I found the answer. The key is to know the file system type of the partition of interest. The lsblk command shows where the (name:broken) volume is mounted. The mount command with no parameters provides the required information about file system type, which is ext4 in this case. Note that several ...


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I found this question while researching the magic I performed recently to do exactly this for one of my users. My workflow differs remarkably to the other answers. Do note, however, this is about the most simple case possible. Assuming your username is ae and your home is /home/ae 1) Set up smbfs: mkdir /home/ae/.smb 1a) If windows login credentials are ...


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Welp... I solved my own problem. sudo mkdir /media/cdrom0 And, add the following line to fstab: /dev/sr0 /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto,exec,utf8 0 0 Everything returns to normal. For some reason it was mounted and broken somehow.. Not sure. Anyways, running a umount on the drive first and reinserting after several system restarts ...


2

GUI tools to make partitions automount From your comment, I understand the GUI tool did not add anything to your fstab file. In general, I am not very fond of GUI tools to edit fstab; many times unnecessary options are added or errors occur. Making an ntfs partition automount, using the uuid Since making an ntfs partition automount is relatively simple, I ...


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Yes, it is safe as long as you have a complex wifi password.The only way for people to get in is by gaining access to your wifi or router (wan). I recommend that you use a password though. If you want to ensure that nobody is on your network, run the arp -na command (you can also use nmap to scan the whole netmask).


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You should read (carefully) the error message: NTFS is either inconsistent, or there is a hardware fault, or it's a SoftRAID/FakeRAID hardware. In the first case run chkdsk /f on Windows then reboot into Windows twice. The usage of the /f parameter is very important! If the device is a SoftRAID/FakeRAID then first activate it and mount a different device ...


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As long as you only use this on your private home network and you don't share the network with other people that you don't know/trust (such as in an apartment complex), then you should be fine. WPA2 can be breached through brute-force attacks but someone would have to be in range of your wifi connection in order to attempt to gain access, and if you're very ...


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I found a simple solution using systemd. With WantedBy systemd provides an easy way to run things if some other service is started. I just put the service in \lib\systemd\system\crypt-backup.service. It is activated by systemctl enable crypt-backup.service [Unit] Description=Run the backup script when /media/stephan/Documents gets mounted [Service] ...


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Follow the steps to mount lvm partitions: In live session, open a terminal Press Ctrl+Alt+T and run: sudo fdisk -l This lists out the partition table of the system and it looked something like this: Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1* 1 4864 39070048+ 83 Linux /dev/sda2 4865 6691 14675377+ 83 LVM2_member ... The next step was to ...


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I had same problem. Try: ntfsfix /dev/sda5 "remove_hiberfile" option no longer works. "ntfs-3g" package policy is to use the new tool ntfsfix However, this tool didn't work for me either. So I plugged the hard disk in a Windows machine, turned off "Fast Startup" in power button options from within Windows, then shutdown and replaced back the hd in my ...


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Here's an example from my fstab to mount a 2nd internal drive (it's a legacy Windows drive, hence the mountpoint name and file system type) UUID=01D0465A0EE56520 /media/Win-G ntfs defaults 0 0 Here are the properties for the mount point. Note that root owns it, but other users have read/write/delete permissions.


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Try gnome-disk-image-mounter: $ gnome-disk-image-mounter sda.img No sudo required. It will be mounted at /media/your_user_name/partition_name, just like USB drives.


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When file system or hard disk have errors it will show as read only file system. Reboot the system and go to recovery mode. Get the root command prompt and run fsck on all partitions. After successful file system check reboot the system and try login. Hope this helps.


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I'm not really good at this stuff, but here it goes: This could mean a corrupt installation. Try installing the newer Ubuntu LTS 14.04. You could go into recovery, drop to root terminal and run do-dist-upgrade Don't forget to enable r/w in the recovery menu and also networking. It's best to use the Ethernet ports for this (Wi-Fi doesn't work well in recovery ...


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use sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdXX as sdXX is the drive name that should fix the file system permissions then try to open the drive "mounting it" I will be waiting for replay if it worked or not


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You should change vfat to ntfs in your fstab file. And make sure you have an ntfs driver installed (e.g. ntfs-3g).


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Your array is not listed in /etc/fstab, therefore it is not automatically mounted. If you want it to be automatically mounted in a specific location, you need to add it.


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The reason is quite clear. You did not set mounting rules for this disk in /etc/fstab/. When system starts, the disk is not mounted. Just add a line to /etc/fstab for a permanent rule and the problem will be solved. This is a guide.


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It happens, because Windows 8 is not turning off computer completely, but it is more like hibernation - it saves the disk state and computer can boot faster. Hibernation "locks" the disk so we have to disable fastboot, which is reason why Windows 8 doesn't turn off properly. In Windows, go to Control Panel, Hardware and Sound, Power Options and select ...


1

You are attempting to use the old configuration of an encrypted swap with your current setup that is not using encryption. You can: Use your unencrypted swap: Change the line in /etc/fstab starting with /dev/mapper/cryptswap1 into /dev/disk/by-uuid/88052649-8989-4112-accf-594df53783ce none swap defaults 0 2 and use sudo swapon -a Use an encrypted swap ...


0

Ehhh, never reboot like that. You likely corrupted your HDD, and you need to run this at the command line: sudo fsck -a /dev/sda If that runs and output no errors then your HDD is OK. If it outputs errors, then it should automatically attempt to fix them. If it can, all should be well. If it didn't output any errors and still doesn't work, then please ...


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To David: Android 5. No MTP (unless thats linked to the android version). Have tried installing LIBMTP etc. No go!


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First of all do not mount partitions to /boot. That is fundamentally wrong. It may get your system unworkable. To see partitions in your file manager you need to mount them to sub-directories of /media The line should look like UUID=4462435862434E3C /media/Data ntfs-3g defaults,windows_names,locale=en_US.utf8 0 0 You will also need to change the ...


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In case anyone has the same problem, vgimportclone is your savior.


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For some reason, the update change the permission of /bin/mount and umount which prevented the system from booting properly. I booted from live CD and changed the permissions back and it booted fine this time with all updates! Problem solved!


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try to fix it from commandline with sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdc1 unless your windows is hibernated: in this case, as Rinzwind suggested you, boot in Windows and shut down properly. Cheers, Silvia


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First you should disable fast startup option in Windows 8.1 , which is a feature that speed up windows booting . As the Picture : Uncheck Turn on fast startup and try again . Source : Link


0

I just had the same issue with a Windows 8.1 host (Asus TF100TA), when I tried to access a public share from my Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS host (kernel 3.13.0-53-generic - might be a bit outdated). Solution for me: Downgrade SMB version from 3.0 (Windows 8) to 2.0 (Vista). root@thor:/mnt# mount -t cifs -o guest,vers=2.0 \\192.168.1.115\cam /mnt/network ...


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In general your setup will be like this: Windows. C: formatted as NTFS as your primairy disk for the OS. Fast boot needs to be disabled or you can loose data on your NTFS disk when you change it from outside Windows since it will boot from a hibernation file that does not have the alterations. Regarding fast boot: Why disable Fast Boot on Windows 8 when ...


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In Trusty udisks2 is installed by default and used by nautilus. The binary is in /usr/bin/udisksctl found via dpkg -L udisks2 | grep bin/ from man udisksctl NAME udisksctl - The udisks command line tool SYNOPSIS udisksctl status udisksctl info {--object-path OBJECT | --block-device DEVICE} udisksctl mount ...


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The solution is simple. To be sure, unmount your external HDD and check the folders in /media/administrator again. Now, there should be only one (empty) folder. Remove the folder with sudo rights: sudo rmdir /media/administrator/HDD1 Explanation Your system usually creates and removes the folders automatically, if you plugging an external device. The ...


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You could try this: blkid and this gives you some info, and this you can use in /etc/fstab you can also do this: 1 | greb -f $a1 and you can also use gparted from software-center.


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i had the same problem on ubuntu 12.04 x64, solved it fast first remounting with sudo mount -o remount, rw / then locating the libudev.so.0 locate -e libudev.so.0 then doin the "dirty trick" sudo ln -s /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libudev.so.0.13.0 /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libudev.so.0 worked perfectly to me, thanx Terdon!


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Btrfs filesystems do not interact with each other, so you cannot mount the @media subvolume on /dev/sd{b,c}1 because the @media subvolume is currently on /dev/sda1, and you get a cross-device error when you try to snapshot /mnt/media to /mnt/media_snap because /mnt/media is on /dev/sd{b,c}1 whereas /mnt/media_snap is on /dev/sda1. Instead of having the ...


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These are all the symptoms of a broken USB stick. Please replace it. To be absolutely sure that it is indeed broken, install the smartmontools package: sudo apt-get install smartmontools then run: sudo smartctl --all /dev/sdd and you'll know for sure that it's broken. Sorry to be the harbinger of bad news


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Allview m7 Start doesn't sound so mainstream (no offense), meaning that the VendorID might be necessary to allow it to connect via USB. Weird stuff, but similar to what I experienced with different phones (Ubuntu phones, but the problem was with the PC. It could very well be that your problem is the same, and can pretty easily be fixed. Open up a terminal on ...


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I eventually traced this problem to the cable. I swapped it with the other apple cable I had (also original from an older iPhone) and it worked. Note that the output of fdisk and lsusb were as above, but the phone was mounted in the file manager.


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Unmounting gvfs solved the problem for me: umount -fl /home/user/.gvfs rm -rf /home/user/.gvfs I found that solution here


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First make sure that your usb device is recognized as sdb1, this could be done my the command dmesg you will receive the following output near end (over here my usb is recognized as sdb1) [67846.595889] sdb: sdb1 [67846.600396] sd 7:0:0:0: [sdb] Attached SCSI removable disk I would prefer you to make your own directory to mount your usb. so type the ...



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