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0

Why doesn't the GUI provide an option to perform this? Typing arcane unix commands at the prompt for something so basic is silly.


0

The sec=ntlm doesn't solve the problem on my desktop (Ubuntu 13.10). It seems the parameter format changed a bit about the domain. Used to work this before but does not now: -o username=msdomain/msusername,password=mspassword I've changed to this format: -o dom=msdomain,username=msusername,password=mspassword and it works well now.


0

I have this exact problem, I've tried so much to fix it. From mount it appears that I have read-write access as you do with the rw. I need an answer too!


2

I found a similar question here, but partition-growth centric. Most important are the tools used. The drive must be unmounted, so to do this you could use a live CD. Howtoforge hosts a howto, linked below: "If you want to resize partitions on production systems, please back up your data before, because it is possible you lose all your data if you don't ...


1

Create a live gParted dvd Boot from it Shrink partition Your problem is related to the fact you can NOT change an active partition. Using a live dvd will not mount your partition giving you the possibility to shrink or enlarge primary partitions. Shrinking is only possible for the amount of FREE space on the partition. And the more data is on the disk ...


1

You can create a LiveUSB of Ubuntu and run gparted from it to resize your hard drive. Since you have installed Ubuntu on your Primary partition, you won't be able to unmount it as long as you are running the operating system off it and, as a result, are unable to resize it.


1

Try gksudo nautilus and enter your password, this will run file browser application with root access so it will have all permissions.


2

Such device names are not persistent, udev makes no guarantees that they will be the same. The Arch Wiki says: Because udev loads all modules asynchronously, they are initialized in a different order. This can result in devices randomly switching names. A udev rule can be added to use static device names. You should use labels or UUIDs instead. ...


1

No, your disk usage for your / does not include your home directory. Have you thought about putting your home in the empty space instead of sliding everything over? Either way, GParted won't be able to move/resize a file system while it's mounted and being used. You can use your Ubuntu live drive or disc for that if you've got one. The more direct ...


0

At present VirtualBox 4.3. does not support USB 3.0. As a workaround you may succed in connecting your device to a USB 2.0 port or a USB 2.0 hub. According to VirtualBox ticket #8873 we may try to attach a USB 3.0 hard drive as a raw disk to the guest OS for a faster transfer speed but this may only work in some cases.


0

When you ran mount only sda5 (your /) was mounted, and it was read-write (rw) so you should be able to write to it. Normally, most of the directories like /sys, /bin are only writeable by root (you'd need sudo first), but your home folder should be writeable to your regular user. Can you create any files in your home folder? Maybe your gui file manager is ...


1

About an hour ago, I had the same problem. I changed my UID, logged out and logged in. I stuck an external drive in the USB port and saw that it was mounted. When I clicked on the drive icon on the Desktop, UBUNTU said that it doesn't know how to open the file. You are lucky since the error message lead you directly to the problem.I am using XUBUNTU ...


0

Unlike windows, Linux is case sensitive. Use this: cd Software instead of: cd software because "software" does not exist but "Software" does.


1

Install VMware tools using the open-vm-tools package. apt-get install open-vm-tools Any other driver install is legacy officially.


0

Check /etc/fstab? I'm not too sure how virtualbox shares, so if changing the mount point breaks the sharing, you could change it back & bind mount /media/sf_share to /srv Info on bind mounting & fstab: http://serverfault.com/questions/613179/how-do-i-do-mount-bind-in-etc-fstab If I had a volume mounted at /media/3tb-vol1/Private/, and ...


0

/dev/sda1 is your root partition, which indeed can not be unmounted while Ubuntu is running off of it, because this is where the operating system is. What I usually do in such cases is to boot from a live CD (my favorite is systemrescuecd) and then resize the partition while it is not active.


1

Disclaimer I do not know if it works and maybe not for this 3-years old bug which seems not to be fixed for Trusty. If you run 14.10 maybe you're lucky... I should be possible to tell directly to the disk manager to hide the disk; I can't test because I have not spare partition on this PC. Open "Disk utility" via the dash, and select the "mount option" ...


0

I don't think you can necessarily do this as easily as you would a GUI. I recommend adding Ubuntu Desktop (or some GUI) first, and then trying to insert the Guest Additions ISO. If that still doesn't work, try navigating to the ISO file and burning it on to an actual medium. From there, you should mount your host CD/DVD drive and install additions that way. ...


0

If you have installed nautilus then Open Nautilus, go to "File"->"Connect to Server". By giving proper arguments you can mount it in your filesystem


0

For me on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, I had to set the following To automatically import the zpools, change the value from 1 to 0: File: /etc/init/zpool-import.conf modprobe zfs zfs_autoimport_disable=0 To automatically mount the zfs mounts, add the following line: File: /etc/rc.local zfs mount -a Restarted, and the zpool ZFS mounts were mounted ...


0

As far as I understand, the CIFS share is shared on a Windows machine and mounted on Ubuntu... If my assumption is correct, just define UID "root" with the same PWD on the Windows machine. If not, leave a note @Fabby and I'll delete my answer...


0

Try this mount –t cifs //servername/sharename /mountpoint –o username=userid It will ask for the password, once you enter this command. Also make sure that you have cifs share entry in /etc/fstab


0

Very short answer: Yes! "/" and swap on SSD, "/home" (and any other files) on RAID-5


0

Since you could not get unencrypted content and the read-only filesystem problem messed up the steps, login to a TTY (CtrlAltF1) using your username and password, and do: sudo mkdir /home/bak sudo mv $HOME /home/bak sudo mv /home/.ecryptfs /home/bak sudo cp -R /etc/skel $HOME sudo chown -R $USER:$USER $HOME In order, these commands do: Make a backup ...


0

As of today, ZFS on Linux (ZoL) now also supports read-only access to snapshots via a invisible (not hidden, invisible) directory in the root of the dataset. # ls -a /tank/test ./ ../ boot.tar text.tar text.tar.2 # cd /tank/test/.zfs/ # ls -a ./ ../ shares/ snapshot/ In the snapshot directory you'll find read-only copies of all your snapshots. ...


0

I was able to connect my redmi 1s directly w/o an issue. It was available in Devices in Nautilus. I will suggest you to update your ubuntu sudo apt-get update Or simply run Software Updater and update ubuntu base and drivers.


0

Good point virus boy that is the question that led me here, what "error code 2133571347" I was using extundelete on a fat drive, and realized it later. testdisk/photorec do nicely and let you work on a dd image without looping it.


0

When you use mount, -r is a suffix syntax that returns as mounted read only. In order to do any writing to the disk you must not mount in read only. So when you type it out, it should say mount -o loop oldhd.img /mnt Also form a sourceforge fourm post Error code 2133571347 is "EXT2_ET_BAD_MAGIC" This means, there is no valid signature for the ...


-2

sth is wrong, bc when you mounted, should not be extundelete /dev/sdb --restore-all try extundelete /dev/loop0 --restore-all to be real sure which loop, type mount that will give you a list of what is mounted, source, and dest /dev/sdb is 99.99% a hard device on scsi/ahci bus


0

The proper way of solving this would be changing the CN (identity) of the server certificate to set it to your domain (in this case fsrv.company). However you can get around this by doing it the ghetto way, add a command to the boot (on Ubuntu that would be Startup Applications for example) with the following: echo y | mount /mnt/fileserver This will ...


0

The setting corresponding to izx's to disable automatically launching nemo in the cinnamon desktop is: gsettings set org.cinnamon.desktop.media-handling automount-open false


0

This is this bug: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/shotwell/+bug/1400470 As a workaround for now, try unmouting the camera in Nautilus and starting Shotwell.


0

"We are unable to get it to connect to any computer" sounds like the USB is pretty much dead. But does anything show up on linux/Ubuntu from lsblk or sudo blkid or sudo fdisk -l? If nothing about the usb, that's a big red flag that it's dead. What are the messages in dmesg or files in /var/log/ (like /var/log/syslog) when it's plugged in? Should have some ...


0

So you have four disks, one SSD that stands alone, and three 3TB drives in a RAID5 set. It sounds like you won't be doing much on your home directory, with your web, media, plex, etc. on the RAID array. So I would install the OS (root) and swap on the SSD and then mount the RAID device on a directory and carve it up into your requisite subdirectories. That ...


1

Your statement "1TB is the Master Boot Record" is not exactly the right way of looking at things. The dialog is indicating the partitioning method, not the location of the boot sector for your installation. There is an unfortunate ambiguity between these two meaning of master boot record (MBR). However, if this was in fact where your boot sector resides ...


0

As a good alternative to badblocks you can try diskscan ( from terminal:apt-get install diskscan). It measures the latency time of reading sectors and it also reports bad sectors. The longer the latency time the greater the probabilify of an error developing.


0

You need to get the exfat utilites first. Follow the directions in this previously answered question: How to get a drive formatted with exfat working?


1

Does the drive work normally on other computers or windows? Can you read & write to the entire drive? I've used external usb drive "cases" before, where you plug in a HD or cd/dvd drive, Ubuntu (Linux Mint) usually sees the HD's as /dev/sdc (for example) like a regular drive. No need for usbmount or pmount, but maybe yours is newer or weird somehow. Are ...


0

The uid= and gid= options do not apply to ext4 file systems. All you need to do is mount the file system as you did (sudo mount -o rw /dev/sdb1 1TB/). Then sudo chown myusername:mygroupname 1TB Then you will own the file system you created and will be able to create files there as yourself.


1

Your hard-disk itself has a problem on one of its sectors and the hard-disk problem needs to be fixed before you try to re-use it. All that you've done until now is running file system repair tools which all assume they have a good hard drive to work with If you really suspect hard drive failure, (which is what this looks like) you should run badblocks In ...


0

I got a suggestion of running grub-install instead of update-grub after update-initramfs and that did misteriously the trick, thanks to all who replied and those who considered my question


1

I know the current LTS live versions of Linux Mint (Ubuntu-based) normally mounts to /media/mint/[directory]. Ubuntu's should be similar, but it's easy to check: Iif the drive is mounted somewhere, you can go to a terminal and run lsblk to see what partitions are mounted where. mount shows similar info, but has more than just physical drives/partitions. ...


0

To answer your question though, "Operation not permitted" is what you will see when there is already a mount attached to the named folder "/Users/me/Remote" Using the Finder instead works fine, because it will instead mount the remote under /Volumes and not introduce that conflict.


0

I finally made it work. It was an energy problem. I have a notebook "board" which serves as ventilation and usb hub. I pĺugged 2 usb hubs to it with keyboard and trackball attached to them and I was trying to connect the Blu-ray unit to one of the hubs. I disconnected all this, connect everything to an energized hub plugged directly to the notebook and it ...


1

In addition to the other answers. The system does not allow hard link to directory: # ln mydir mpoint ln: `mydir': hard link not allowed for directory The mount let you make hard link-like ie two or more names for same one inode: # mount -B mydir/ mpoint/ # ls -d -i * 807175 mpoint/ 807175 mydir/ (One can find it helps for snapshot-backup with ...


0

This is because your "Windows" system is in a intermediate state, may be its in hibernation mode or not full shutdown, try a system restart on your windows and shutdown the system fully and check the mount on your Ubuntu, it should work.


0

I was having the same issue after upgrading ubuntu 14.04 to 14.10. Here is what solved the problem for me: Edit /etc/default/nfs-common and make sure it says: NEED_STATD=yes After restarting, my NFS mounts worked.


0

I had the same problem after upgrading ubuntu gnome from 14.04 to 14.10. The following solved it: Edit /etc/default/nfs-common and make sure it says: NEED_STATD=yes Restart and your nfs mounts should work.


3

Additionally, ln -s would survive a reboot; whereas mount --bind would not, unless you edit /etc/fstab to make it persistent.



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