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1

Run mount | grep ^/. You'll get something like this: /dev/sda1 on / type ext4 (rw,errors=remount-ro) As you can see, the file system is ext4 in my case.


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It looks like you have too many fields. The first field is the Windows share name. For you that would be //192.168.2.3/miracle. The second field is the mapped directory on the Linux side. For you it's /media. That gives you an extra field called /miracle before you give the FS type. Maybe there's a space in the share name on the Windows side. If so, use ...


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This depends on the way you installed Ubuntu, because there's a world of different methods which will produce unique results. Did you use Wubi, install from a CD/USB, etc.? Also, it seems like you're trying to access your Windows partition from Linux. There's no need to do this. When you installed Linux, I assume it also installed GRUB (GRand Unified ...


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The procedure is that you first unmount any disks that may still be mounted: sudo umount /mnt/... (that is not a typo, the command is umount) Then the directory /mnt/... is empty and can be removed: sudo rmdir /mnt/... Then you can make a new mount point elsewhere: sudo mkdir /mnt/newmountpoint and mount the disk there: sudo mount -t auto ...


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Install ntfs-3g with sudo apt-get install ntfs-3g. Then run the ntfsfix command on your NTFS partition. ntfsfix v2.0.0 (libntfs 10:0:0) Usage: ntfsfix [options] device Attempt to fix an NTFS partition. -h, --help Display this help -V, --version Display version information For example: ntfsfix /dev/hda6 Developers' ...


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First check the raid(s): d@monster:~/Apps $>sudo dmraid -r /dev/sdd: isw, "isw_fhabhedd", GROUP, ok, 3907029166 sectors, data@ 0 /dev/sdc: isw, "isw_fhabhedd", GROUP, ok, 3907029166 sectors, data@ 0 /dev/sdb: isw, "isw_dhejejifba", GROUP, ok, 3907029166 sectors, data@ 0 /dev/sda: isw, "isw_dhejejifba", GROUP, ok, 3907029166 sectors, data@ 0 Then, mount ...


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If you want to get read write permissions for copying files from the mounted ISO and do not want to install something else. Just go into terminal shell, navigate to whereever you mounted your ISO, such as: sudo mount -o loop /home/username/whatever.iso /mnt/iso Than copy the entire mounted directory somewhere else: sudo cp -rf /mnt/iso ...


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It is simple. Follow these steps: fdisk -l This will list out the partitions. Lets assume, your disc is "xxx" pmount xxx /media/mydisc; Your disk will be mounted at /media/mydisc directory. If you want to unmount it, umount /media/mydisc;


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every thing it's OK but u should add these option with your options code uid=941100071 to be olume user="my_user" fstype="cifs" server="my_server" path="UsersFolders/%(USER)/Documents" mountpoint="~/UserDocuments" options="file_mode=0777,dir_mode=0777,sec=ntlm,uid=941100071" i was have the same problem with fstab and the uid was a solution . i ...


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Well, I have found explanation myself. It turned out that Ubuntu does some voodoo magic around file systems mounted in the /media directory. So in the /etc/fstab file I changed mount points from /media to /mnt as follows: # Windows C: /dev/sda1 UUID=2EF64975F6493DF9 /mnt/win_c ntfs auto,ro 0 0 # Windows D: /dev/sdb1 UUID=50C40C08C40BEED2 ...


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Guest Additions itself may have been causing an additional uninvited issue you were unaware of. The ticket for the issue can be found here https://www.virtualbox.org/ticket/12879 and has been resolved in Guest Additions 4.3.12 Guest Additions 4.3.10 has an incorrect symlink for which the workaround is to create a new symlink: sudo ln -s ...


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sudo apt-get install usbmount automatically mount and unmount USB mass storage devices This package automatically mounts USB mass storage devices (typically USB pens) when they are plugged in, and unmounts them when they are removed. The mountpoints (/media/usb[0-7] by default), filesystem types to consider, and mount options are configurable. ...


1

The mount order will typically be determined by the last integer field in /etc/fstab. For example: UUID=XXX / ext4 errors=remount-ro,noatime,nodiratime 0 1 Here the last integer field will determine the order (the smaller, the earlier). So you probably want nfs mount to have some order here (e.g. 2) and loopback higher than that (e.g. 3). However, with ...


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Run this in a terminal, in Linux: sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdxy where sdxy is the partition.


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Why is it removed ?! I think many people use it cause there is no Novell Client for Ubuntu. sudo add-apt-repository "deb http://se.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ saucy universe multiverse" sudo apt-get install ncpfs Joeri


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Here's a script I use to mount partitions from image files. See the comments at the start of the script for usage information. #!/bin/bash # mount_image, a program that mounts a specific partition from a RAW # disk image file, such as a full-disk dd copy or a file used by QEMU. # Note that compressed and other space-saving formats (qcaw2, etc.) # will NOT ...


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Based on your ufw status output, your firewall is currently configured to only allow incoming connections for SSH. For NFS, you will need to open the nfs (2049) and RPC portmapper (111) ports. If you only want to connect to the server over the LAN, then I'd recommend restricting the host range e.g. sudo ufw allow from 10.0.0.0/16 to any port 2049 sudo ufw ...


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Create a directory that you want to use as your mount point, for example myserver: sudo mkdir /media/myserver Add the following line to /etc/fstab: myserverip /media/myserver/ davfs noauto,user,rw 0 0 Change myserverip to the IP address or domain name and port of your webDAV server. Open ~/.davfs2/secrets (per user) or /etc/davfs2/secrets ...


1

Your running login session might not be updated with the new group yet. Try just calling groups and see if that lists davfs2. $ sudo useradd foo -M $ groups myuser adm cdrom sudo dip plugdev lpadmin sambashare $ sudo usermod -aG foo myuser $ groups myuser adm cdrom sudo dip plugdev lpadmin sambashare $ su -l myuser $ groups myuser myuser adm cdrom sudo dip ...


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Yes, you need to specify the UUID in /etc/fstab . . . here is what it should look like with a generic setup, single partition, mount point "/" , and a non encrypted swap. # /etc/fstab: static file system information. # # Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a # device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices # ...


2

1) plug in your flash drive 2) Open a terminal and issue the command dmesg you should see your device name listed at the bottom like this: mine is /dev/sdc. yours may be different. Use the /dev/sd? entry that you see. I will use /dev/sdc. 3) If your device is preformatted like mine the system will automatically mount it and you will have to unmount it ...


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Mostly, order is decided based on this file: gksu gedit /etc/fstab Kindly create one backup of this file and then edit it if needed. Be very careful while editing. For unmounting a drive, sudo umount -l mountpoint or sudo umount -I mountpoint Thank you.


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This can be fix by changing the parent folders' permissions. For example, if folder Database's permission is set to 777, bblab has to set to 777 else Database configuration won't work.


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Most probably bcoz of fast boot in windows. You have to first disable fast boot up feature in windows. follow this guide to disable it - http://www.typicaltips.com/2013/02/disable-fast-startup-in-windows-8.html and after start ubuntu and now you can use your partion


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There's a step by step tutorial that may prove helpful here which is copyrighted so I won't be duplicating it here. Also make sure you have adequate permissions to the mount point.


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To restore the exports use zfs share -a. This will happen at boot if you set ZFS_SHARE="yes" in /etc/default/zfs. Your manual setup looks okay, but you did not make it clear if your data/music_lossless zfs is actually mounted on /mnt/data/music_lossless.


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My solution Start the WD software under Windows (Win7 on my system) Under Drive settings -> Security, I disabled the drive. It now appears like a plain empty drive around 950GB in size.


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go under windows and run checkdisk and reboot and let that do its thing, you have a somewhat corrupt ntfs filesystem that needs to be fixed. After running that ubuntu should just mount it no problem


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If you used the WD software to password-protect the harddisk, it is very unlikely that you would be able to use it under Linux. In addition, it sounds like you damaged the filesystem somehow, if you cannot even open it in Windows any more. If you need to encrypt the harddisk, I would suggest that you find a software to encrypt that supports both linux and ...


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I finally solved this by using the Upstart system to run all of my bindfs scripts after the file system has loaded. I never did get it working in fstab.


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From man losetup : -P, --partscan force kernel to scan partition table on newly created loop device So just run $ sudo losetup -f --show -P /path/to/image.img to mount every partition of your disk image on the first unused loop device and print it to stdout.


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Instead of mount -a, use the proper command: sudo mount /dev/sr0 /media/$USER/<mountpoint> ... replacing <mountpoint> with the name of a real directory in /media/<username> where <username> is the all-lowercase name of the user account.


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There is a zfs package available at launchpad, at https://launchpad.net/~zfs-native/+archive/ubuntu/stable


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Not sure this helps: According what you write, you rebooted after creating the partition, it's old. And I assume you did not create new partitions on the disk since booting? If that is true, this solution will not help, I think - but it will also do no harm (not change anything if it's ok already) - so you could just try: Reread the partition table, in case ...


1

I fix this problem with those steps: check the size (parted) of the physical partition (ie. /dev/sda5) is smaller than the lvm Physical volume (PV) (pvscan) disable lvm pvchange -an with fdisk -l, write down the starting block for each partition with fdisk delete the partition (ie. /dev/sda5) and write changes with fdisk create a new partition of the same ...


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did you do an advanced partitioning in ubuntu while installation. this error usually happens when the disk drives are modified from an external source after ubuntu installation. if you have done that, go to /etc/fstab and tell us what it says along with a screenshot of gparted. alternately try rebooting and be with patience and do not press any key. it ...


1

Adding a disk was the first thing to do indeed. Next, you have to partition your disk. You need at least one partition in it : sudo fdisk /dev/sdb You have to choose option n then p (for a primary partition), a number for the partition (let's take 1 to start). The you are prompted to enter the first sector (should be 0) and then the last one (the default ...


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First, create a new partition on the second hard disk drive sdb and fomrat it, this can be done in one step: # sudo mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdb -I Then mount the created partition on the /var/www/ folder # sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /var/www Note that the www folder should be empty, if not move its contents to another folder, mount the new drive and move the files ...


1

Boot a live usb, make sure all your partitions are unmounted, and run: sudo fsck -y /dev/sda change "sda" to your hard drive. This command will try to fix the problem(s). if it does not work, update your question with any error messages


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Different people use different schemes for partitioning their hard drives depending on their preference, so the answers here will probably vary. For sure you need a "/" partition, and I would recommend a "swap" partition as opposed to a swap file. Also, it is not a bad idea to have a separate "/home" partition. Some users have a separate "/boot" partition, I ...


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Did you get any message after mount /dev/sr0 or mount /dev/cdrom? I got something like: mount: can't find /dev/sr0 in /etc/fstab or /etc/mtab Here is a quick example on my Ubuntu 14.04 Desktop. I mount the DVD to /mnt $ sudo mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/ mount: block device /dev/sr0 is write-protected, mounting read-only $ cd /mnt/ $ ls autorun.inf casper EFI ...


1

Following command worked for me: udisksctl mount --block-device /dev/sda3


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Have fixed the problem. Apparently my firewall was acting like a shredder. The solution was: sudo iptables --flush sudo iptables -P INPUT ACCEPT sudo iptables-save Result: established a ssh connection with my server through on of the devices and successfully mounted the nfs share. A colleague advised me to also slightly change the /etc/exports for safety ...


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From the last 2 lines we can assume your dongle mass storage device is sdb. This mean the device is present on /dev/sdb. You can mount the device to access it by doing mount /dev/sdb /your/folder. ls /your/folder to see the content of the freshly mounted storage, then identify the installation script and run it /your/folder/installation_script_name.


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As @Takkat suggests, reinstall guest addtions after the kernel update sudo /etc/init.d/vboxadd setup sudo shutdown -r now .. then restart the VM. Now after running the script, the mount point succeeds. Ensure that you have dkms installed. sudo apt-get install dkms


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This is a 2TB disk (Seagate), so it needed to be mounted with -y ntfs-3g option (presuming ntfs-3g is installed). /etc/fstab should also hold ntfs-3g option, otherwise the problem persists. just adding uid, gid, fmask and dmask options to mount command without the proper file system indication did not work as well in my case. Many thanks to all!


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Found the solution. BTSync was not seeing the mount points. this was due to the fact that BTSync was running as user BTSync which did not have sufficient rights to see the mounted HDD's


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I believe I found the answer to your question here: Two points: You must be using a 64-bit kernel to use a filesystem > 16TB due to page cache limitation. Version 1.41 and lower of e2fsprogs (used when formatting ext2/ext3/ext4 drives) will fail on volumes > 16TB due to software limitation. Using a newer version of e2fsprogs will help. In your case I ...


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So I found the craziest solution. Booted back to windows and started inspecting the files. Accidentally I had network traffic monitor opened up and each time I opened a file there was some incoming traffic happening. So yes, you've guessed it. These inode/symlinks were not links to a file in some other location, but were actual links to Onedrive's cloud. ...


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From observing your short question, I'm led to believe one of your UUID's are incorrect in /etc/fstab What you could do as Step 1, is to type: sudo blkid then for Step 2 type: sudo nano /etc/fstab and compare the UUID's of all listed devices between the blkid output and your fstab file. If any information does not match, edit fstab as root ...



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