New answers tagged

-1

You should check smb.conf file on server.


0

Ok .. I see a problem You have two lines that say /mnt/Memory I believe the one that starts with 5D is wrong .. you can try putting an # at the beginning of that line and save that file Then type sudo umount /mnt/Memory it should unmount it if its mounted... then type sudo mount -a and see if you get any errors or if everything goes fine and ...


6

Open a terminal and execute : sudo blkid ... search for the UUID of the partition you want to be mounted automatically when booting the operating system. Now add an entry to the fstab file. Open a terminal and execute : gksudo gedit /etc/fstab. Add the UUID from blkid command. Example : sudo blkid /dev/sda1: LABEL="data" UUID="5B9C797F2C733C9B" ...


1

The main.c file is a source code file that is compiled (along with other files) into the grub binary. It's not generally possible to go back from binary files to source files, at least with any accuracy. You could download the GRUB source code, modify it, then compile and install it. But that's a lot of work. You could also use a hex editor to find the ...


1

As a general rule, it's inadvisable (at best) to make /root a separate partition from the root (/) filesystem. The reason is that this is the root user's home directory, and it's critical that this location remain accessible even in the event of a severe problem, such as damage to the /etc/fstab file. I don't know if that's related to your problem, but it ...


0

Ok, I think I managed to get it working, following How to enable or disable services?: sudo bash -c 'echo manual | sudo tee /etc/init/docker.override' Hope that was it...


1

You used the exact same name (ubuntu-vg) for your new volume group as the old volume group. You must give them unique names. You can rename the new group ( with the old disk unplugged ) using vgrename.


1

I just recently installed Ubuntu 16.04 using LVM. I have just done this once, so I won't claim to be an authority on this. My quick take, you are using incorrect syntax. Below is a copy of my "fstab" file. Note the syntax for mounting a logical volume. # /etc/fstab: static file system information. # # Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier ...


1

Not sure if the issue you describe is caused by those entries, but here is how to revert them: Open a terminal and type the following command: pkexec env DISPLAY=$DISPLAY XAUTHORITY=$XAUTHORITY gedit /etc/fstab (best copy the command and paste it into the command line by pressing CTRL+SHIFT+V). You will be asked for your password. This will open the ...


0

I guess (I make this answer "community wiki" so feel free to improve), that is because Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS does not use (by default) systemd, so it does not know about x-systemd.automount concept.


0

You are mounting this drive on a subfolder of /mnt. Your user must have read (r) and (x) permissions on both the subfolder and /mnt. However, resetting ownership of /mnt is not recommended. To avoid this issue, I would recommend you mount your drive on a subfolder of your home directory (/home/username/ntfs).


0

This is a pretty routine thing to do. Linux supports about every filesystem ever invented. This link is has a write-up of how to mount a mac filesystem and copy files http://superuser.com/q/84446/152045 See the response with 123 votes - it addresses the case you are dealing with. The top response with the green check mark doesn't apply to your case


0

The hardware was corrupted by some reasons which I could not understand. If you try all things written up and can not get any result, can be sure the usb drive will not be used anymore.


2

Mounting your Windows filesystems read-only seems a little more straight-forward to me than the umask option: UUID=3E98352E9834E655 /mnt/hiro1 ntfs ro,noauto 0 0 UUID=24F62FADF62F7E64 /mnt/hiro2 ntfs ro,noauto 0 0 I also made separate mount-points for each filesystem, in case you ever wanted to have them both mounted at the same time


0

Simply specify the hard disk as the "file" qemu should use, for example /dev/sdb or /dev/disk/by-uuid/some-uuid-here. Of course, you must make sure nothing else is using that disk other than this vm or bad things (TM) will happen.


1

After you've installed Ubuntu, it will never do anything to modify those Windows drives unless you explicitly tell it to. In reality, I would never even worry about modifying your fstab file, but keeping the 'noauto' flag won't hurt anything and will, in fact, prevent Ubuntu from trying to mount the drives automatically (just in case, I suppose)


0

You are almost there. Open FSTAB by using: sudo nano /etc/fstab In the last line ( or on of the last lines) place: //192.168.0.5/storage /media/myname/TK-Public/ cifs username=YOURUSERNAME,password=YOURPASSWORD,iocharset=utf8,file_mode=0777,dir_mode=0777 *** (this is all one long line) Ctrl-X to close, Y to save and Enter to seal the deal. Now ...


0

I had the same problem. It resolved itself when I upgraded to Jewel. The release notes state that Jewel (the latest version) is the first release where Ceph FS is declared stable, but you can only have one metadata server. This is the first release in which CephFS is declared stable! Several features are disabled by default, including snapshots and ...


1

Using Ubuntu 15.10, you can install vhdimount and tsk (The Sleuth Kit) via: sudo apt-get install libvhdi-utils sleuthkit Then you can proceed as follows: sudo mkdir -v /mnt/vhd sudo vhdimount -X allow_root /path/to/file.vhd /mnt/vhd/ sudo mmls -aB /mnt/vhd/vhdi1 Next, you'll have to calculate the offset from the output of mmls like this: echo ...


0

I had this same issue after some updates today. I've done some testing and found that removing the sgrp="..." parameter to the volume allows them to mount. It looks like it thinks there are no volumes to mount because the user wasn't in the listed group. This leads me to believe the problem is a result of this bug filed for the latest update to winbind that ...


2

Install dconf-editor (if it is not already installed): sudo apt install dconf-editor then run it dconf-editor Now from the left column go to org > gnome > desktop > media-handling. Here you can uncheck automount.


0

dconf-editor will allow you to disable it. For full details see https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Mount/USB


0

I had the same requirement in my end . Best way to Block MTP,PTP for android is to disable the service in ubuntu . Enter this location as root /usr/lib/gvfs "sudo nautilus" will be easy if you tend to use GUI "sudo nautilus" and the n navigate to computer/usr/lib/gvfs There will be list of services Remove the execute permission by right clicking the ...


0

For sharing partition in dual boot You should create and NTFS partition and set up it to mount automatically on Ubuntu start. You can edit the file /etc/fstab and include a line like this: /dev/sda10 /media/Winbugs7/ ntfs-3g defaults,user,rw 0 0 Where /dev/sda10 is the partition and /media/Winbugs7 is the (existing!) directory where the partition will ...


0

This is apparently normal behavior for NFS. Mounted file systems are not re-exported automatically. You must explicitly export the mounted filesystem in /etc/exports on the server: /location/disk clientMachine(rw,sync,no_subtree_check,no_root_squash) Don't forget to sudo exportfs -ra on the server, then unmount and re-mount /location on the ...


0

rm -R A" or sudo rm -R A" doesn't work (not even as root) because " is a special character which must be escaped with a backslash \ otherwise it's interpreted by the shell (and that has nothing to do with permissions or ownership of the file/folder). Since all the foldernames (except Speciale) start with a letter & end with a " you can delete them ...


0

It turns out is is not possible at all, as explained in another answer in unix.SE. The reason is that mount options are hardcoded in udisk2 (see FSMountOptions in udiskslinuxfilesystem.c). A patch has been proposed to make mount options user-configurables but it has not been integrated as of April 2016.


0

If you want to hide fstab mounted drives from the Launcher, you can do it this way: Install dconf-editor if you haven't already. Start dconf-editor and scroll down to com → canonical → Unity → devices and enter the UUID of the mount in blacklist. Here's an example of what it looks like on my system.


0

You need to format it with a unix filesystem instead of fat32.


0

Ok, looks like I just didn't understand how a RAID 5 works. I had always selected 3+1 without really knowing about the Hot Spare mechanism in RAID 5, which then always resulted in 3 TB x ((3 - 1) - 1) = 6 TB total space https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_spare The missing dev/md0 was due to a falsely generated mdadm.conf Cheers


4

iocharset=utf8 sets what encoding to use when mounting drives or network shares. According to Wikipedia: UTF-8 is a character encoding capable of encoding all possible characters, or code points, defined by Unicode. It's pretty much a safety feature just to make sure Ubuntu can present all text in a readable format (shows it correctly), and save ...


0

In sudo pam-auth-update I made sure the GNOME Keyring Daemon was also selected. This fixed the issue.


0

I Can't help with Ubuntu. But that pen drive properly mounted in windows first it will ask for the scan and fix for the removable drive: choose scan and fix and then choose start as showed below: It will take some time. After completing that operation, insert the USB back to Ubuntu. It worked


0

Mine got locked for weeks on Read-Only mode. I tried everything I could find online both on Ubuntu and Windows. Finally it was fixed simply with "Disks" software that comes with Ubuntu 15.10. - Plug your USB (mine is 8GB SanDisk Cruzer Fit). - Open "Disks", select the drive, then unmount it. - From the Settings menu select format partition, and format it as ...


0

I use KDE4 and I've found that the paths are reverted upon reboot, even though I set the drive to automount at boot via KDE's "Removable devices" (something like that name, I use a localized KDE). I've solved the issue by putting the following into "/etc/rc.local": su username -c 'xdg-user-dirs-update --set DOCUMENTS "/media/username/Data/Documents"' su ...


0

I went to the technician. He could not help, he followed the same procedure. So in case someone has the same problem, I share my solution: If you unmount the disc physically from the laptop, using IcyBox (or similar) you can turn it into external drive. Booting still doesn't work, but in my case I could copy all data from the disc (they were accessible). ...


0

I realise this is an old thread but I will add this just in case it helps someone. I have also had similar problems with and external disk in the past which I think were linked to usb power problems. I got the person I was helping to try the disk in a powered usb hub and this made it visible and mountable. Try that before throwing the disk away as it may be ...


3

There is no C: partition and no D: partition anymore. As you said that you installed Ubuntu by choosing the option to use the whole disk for Ubuntu, of course the disk was erased completely. The C: partition on which most probably the Windows operating system was located and the D: partition on which most probably your personal data was located before are ...


1

You need to repair your filesystem. You can do it with testdisk: sudo apt-get install testdisk sudo testdisk >Create a new log file [Choose Disk] >Intel/PC partition >Advanced [Choose Partition] >Boot >Repair FAT [Accept Defaults and Write] >(Q)uit until exited Source link here


0

The following is a bit hacky, but works: Install virtualbox / vagrant Follow the instructions on http://code-chronicle.blogspot.de/2014/08/connect-usb-device-through-vagrant.html to enable usb in virtualbox. Setup the vagrant file # -*- mode: ruby -*- # vi: set ft=ruby : Vagrant.configure(2) do |config| config.vm.box = "hashicorp/precise64" ...


1

The accepted answer does not really answer the question, namely how to mount and unmount hard drives using udisks like Nautilus does when clicking on a disk. The command you are looking for is udiskctl. It's super easy, and also works with encrypted disks! Mounting (encrypted disk): Unlock the disk: $ udisksctl unlock -b /dev/sdb1 Unlocked /dev/sdb1 as ...


0

problem solved with 1-2 hours or waiting. stored all data on the 3TB drive and formatted the 2 drives as fat32 under ubuntu with gparted. then stored all data back from the 3tb drive to the other 2. along with the files i needed to acces from the drive itself. ever since fat-32 is supported by both os is seemed more conveniënt to do this now instead of ...


1

if your goal is to explore or modify the content of a partition (file system), this command line will mount the file system of the sd card dump my_sdcard_dump.img into the directory mount_dir. part_id=2; INFILE=my_sdcard_dump.img; MOUNTPT=mount_dir PARTITION=${part_id}; sudo mount "$INFILE" "$MOUNTPT" -o loop,offset=$[ `/sbin/sfdisk -d "$INFILE" | grep ...


2

Start a shell and type du /home/elliot/BigData This will return the used space, as caulculated by the files that exist on the partition. You can append -h for human readable and -s for summary. Per your comment, it's only showing 6.1GB used so something seems to be wrong with the partition. You can attempt to fix this with fsck. You need to unmount the ...


0

If your drive already has partitions with data on them you absolutely do not want to mount the drive. You want to mount the partition: sudo mount /dev/sdb2 /mnt


2

If you have an issue with this share, you can unmount it on hibernate/suspend and remount it on resume. In order to do that you should create a script in /etc/pm/sleep.d/, call it 50-share_handling (for example), and put the next lines in it: #!/bin/sh # Unmount CIFS share on hibernate/suspend and remount it on resume case "$1" in ...


1

Your disk is not partitioned; it's being used "raw." You can tell this from the following blkid output from your original post: /dev/sdl: UUID="ac3bfba8-049a-4ace-83c6-2749422211f1" TYPE="ext4" Note the device identifier is /dev/sdl, which includes no partition number. This contrasts with the output for your other disks' partitions, which do include ...


2

I have the same issue. Note that with the SDCard inserted in a SDCard reader I can see all files, so I think it is not due to the filesystem. I have reported the issue to GoPro support. They say that GoPro doesn't give support for Linux, that could lead to think that GoPro do not work with Linux.


-2

up vote 9 down vote I think you are suffering the bug #1021375 You can workaround it by renaming the folder ~/.config/nautilus and then logout and log back in. 1. mv ~/.config/nautilus ~/.config/nautilus-bak 2. Logout. 3. Login. shareedit answered Jan 29 '14 at 19:43 desgua Thanks, this works perfectly in Debian wheezy and Kali 1.1.0 too.


0

Thank you everyone who gave feedback! I tried the disks on different laptops now and they work fine here. So it appears that there is something wrong with the laptop I had been using, where after some random time the connection gets interrupted, irrespective of which USB plug I use.



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