Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I tried that but i get this error. /sbin/mount.davfs:/etc/davfs2/davfs2.conf:34: unknown option This is the line that i uncommented for secrets. That line is like below. secrets ~/.davfs2/secrets I double checked what i did and it looks right but i got error. I can mount interactively but i couldn't mount auto. My davfs2 version is 1.4.7. I ...


0

Firstly exit the root shell and use sudo with each command Execute these commands one by one: sudo fdisk -lu "/media/mark/Seagate Expansion Drive/SSD/ssd.img" Mount image on a loop device by following command before mounting loop0 on a directory : sudo losetup -o 28672 /dev/loop0 "/media/mark/Seagate Expansion Drive/SSD/ssd.img" Now make a directory ...


1

Reading through that guide, /dev/sda is mounted at mnt, and you are still in directory mnt/recovery at the point you try to unmount it. You can't umount it because you are still using it, so change directory first:- cd ~ and then sudo umount /dev/sda and it should unmount. If not, edit your question to include what happened.


0

You could try: sudo umount -l /mountpoint/of/your/partition -l forces the partition to unmount even if it is in use / busy.


0

You have a hardware problem. Those CDs are probably full of scratches and cannot be read any more and will have to be replaced. Sorry to be the harbinger of bad news... That being said, there might be something you can do to temporarily restore the CDs to final quality by this life-hack on http://lifehacks.stackexchange.com, a sister site to Ask Ubuntu.


0

For some reason I had to tweak @elemer82 answear to make it work with my ext4 partition. I put it here for the record. You may not need the UUID: in my case I just used /dev/sda in my /etc/fstab. So I just did: sudo nano -Bw /etc/fstab And entered the following line (I added the header here for clarity): # <file system> <mount point> ...


1

You could use the ssd as a cache drive in the raid utility with conjunction with your hdd. In that way your mobo (if supported) can automatically detect and cache in the ssd your most used data without you setting mount points and it works with any os and any partition you might use.


0

Moving /opt and my Projects directory to other partitions solved the issue.


0

Try mounting the first partition /dev/sdb1 instead of the device /dev/sdb Likewise for the other commands, use the partition. Now while it is possible to have created the disk without partitions, that's not likely, but if you did, then include the loop option in the mount command -- ie. treat it like a big file. The partitionless disk you created should ...


0

If it won't mount more then likely you have a bad sector (which is why you can't access your files), It's cheaper just to replace the hard drive then to spend time fixing it if that is the case, I would unscrew the case and just buy a 3.5inch drive and replace it. It's pretty simple to do that.


0

Try this, I just did this on the weekend for my father in law and it worked like a charm. Hopefully it will work for you as well. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/MountingWindowsPartitions


0

Clearly the permissions are not right. I set the permissions but the changes were lost multiple times. I auto-mounted the hdd with the following line in my fstab file: sudo mount -t ntfs-3g -o uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=007 /dev/sda1 /media/NASDRIVE I noticed the umask=007 which caused my problems. I changed it to 000, which I know is not save.


3

-t vfstype The argument following the -t is used to indicate the file system type. The filesystem types which are currently supported include: adfs, affs, autofs, cifs, coda, coherent, cramfs, debugfs, devpts, efs, ext, ext2, ext3, ext4, hfs, hfsplus, hpfs, iso9660, jfs, minix, msdos, ncpfs, nfs, nfs4, ntfs, proc, qnx4, ramfs, ...


0

/dev/sda4 is mounted at the root of the filesystem, which is what / represents. It's sort of like the root of the Ubuntu filesystem tree, everything else comes under root, unless you specifically mount parts of your system on other partitions. When you type a file path, that first / represents root.


1

/dev/sda4 partition has my OSX boot No, it does not. It is the root system for your Ubuntu. /dev/sda1 holds you EFI boot; that is the one that lets you boot into operating systems (plural!). And are all these other partitions normal? Yes. Do take notice of the "NONE" in the filesystem column. This indicates a partition that is not physical but ...


0

You can share files to iPad via WiFi through an ipad app that handles the samba protocol. I used FileBrowser app available in the App Store and works for me. I had the same problem so far is the only way I've found.


0

You have a problem in the samba configuration file. Since you are trying to access the share from Windows, you have to mention the workgroup as well under [global] settings section. This section is commented out by default. such as below (this is just an example). You can read more about it @https://help.ubuntu.com/lts/serverguide/samba-fileserver.html ...


1

The correct, best solution would be changing the label of the disk. I too had problem with some disk and needed to do that in Windows (grrrr). Two solutions: learn to quote the filenames correctly: ls "/media/mark/Seagate Expansion Drive/" (notice the ") will work. See also http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/bash-quoting or ...


1

Open a terminal and type: sudo blkid Find and copy needed uuid to reproduce it in fstab then run: sudo gedit /etc/fstab add to the end lines like this (e.g.): #My-Partition UUID=xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx /media/Robbino1 ext3 defaults 0 1 Where xxxxxxxxxx is /dev/sda uuid that you copied, then reboot. You can also manually change permissions ...


1

Boot into recovery mode and you can edit /etc/fstab from the command prompt.


-1

mehedi@Mehedi:~$ sudo blkid [sudo] password for mehedi: /dev/sda1: UUID="9befcfc0-96e4-45dc-959c-addd5e440498" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sda2: UUID="6c2d8d89-38d6-4590-9980-279c3d7954bf" TYPE="swap" /dev/sda3: UUID="f29ebd22-4ccf-4d45-8c57-ad18616e91f5" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sda4: LABEL="Elmesh" UUID="0DA0CAA85371CC88" TYPE="ntfs" mehedi@Mehedi:~$


0

You can fix this with the following command sudo -i -e 's/UUID=381C-CD68/#UUID=381C-CD68/g' /etc/fstab This will comment out (add a # ) to the front of the line for your windows partiton. You can fix fstab by re-writing the line. Post the output of sudo blkid and we can re-write


0

The entry in /etc/crypttab and the first entry in /etc/fstab are required. Those entries are needed in order for your encrypted filesystem to be decrypted and mounted correctly to appear as a normal filesystem. The second entry in /etc/fstab: /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-swap_1 none swap sw 0 0 This entry mounts swap space. In a nutshell, swap space is RAM on ...


2

Nautilus uses the Gnome Virtual File System (gvfs) to mount devices. In a system that's already running a gvfsd daemon you can initiate a mount manually using the gvfs-mount command e.g. gvfs-mount smb://ip.address.goes.here/sharename which should cause a link to the share to appear in the Nautilus sidebar; the actual mountpoint should appear in the ...


1

You have multiple questions, let me answer them separately. Let me make a distinction between a device (located in /dev) and a mounted filesystem. Think of the device as an interface to the hardware, and the filesystem as the method to write and keep track of the data on the device. In order to write data directly to the device, it must not be in use, and ...


0

I finally fixed it. I had to add the following line in /etc/fstab: UUID={The parition UUID} /media/sdb1 ntfs uid=1000,gid=1000,dmask=027,fmask=137 0 0 and make the links again.


0

Usually, if a CD or DVD is inserted, you can see them under /dev/cdrom. You wont be able to view the contents from that location directly such as by doing cd /dev/cdrom or ls . You can mount this CD by creating a mount point or using the existing mount point such as /media run the following command sudo mount /dev/cdrom /media #you can use your custom ...


0

The partition table might have become corrupted. You can check this with fdisk: fdisk -l /dev/sdb If fdisk output shows a message like this: This doesn't look like a partition table Probably you selected the wrong device. and you don't wish to keep the data in it, you can try formatting it with gparted: sudo gparted /dev/sdb


0

Assuming that the drive hardware is functional, you should start with a file-system check. Open a terminal with CTRLALTT or your preferred method. Issue the command: sudo fsck /dev/sdb1 If prompted to repair, do so. If you get: No such file or directory while trying to open /dev/sdb1 Possibly non-existent device? Refer to @DavidFoerster comment "Your ...


1

Yes, man encfs should tell you all you need to know. I think the command is essentially encfs /the/encrypted-dir /the/empty/mountpoint-dir replacing directories with your real ones. If there are any errors I think there's a -v option for more info, and check logs, and update your Q if it doesn't work. All the needed info should be in a config file in the ...


0

This isn't a certain solution, but it may help you narrow it down and possibly fix it. If you have a USB thumbdrive, pull "Multisystem" off the Software Center. It allows you to install live (and persistent) Linux OSs to the stick you can boot up with (you just need the .ISO images to feed it. Other Operating Systems too). Then, just tell your system to ...


0

Looks like this bug: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/udisks/+bug/743303 Reloading these kernel modules helped: sudo rmmod mmc_block rtsx_usb_ms rtsx_usb_sdmmc rtsx_usb sudo modprobe rtsx_usb_sdmmc FTYI, I found the relevant modules with lsmod|grep mmc


0

Alternatively, you can just add delays to the files in: ~/.desktop/autostart/someapp.desktop Edit it with a text editor of your choice and add the delay with the line: X-GNOME-Autostart-Delay=999 In units of seconds.


0

I just had a similar issue when trying to dual boot windows 7 with Ubuntu 14.04 and after several problems, I finally figured out that the HDD was dying when in the windows drive selection part of the setup showed one of the disks offline. I'm no expert but if your drive is old enough, that may be a possibility. I've seen a couple of threads on forced ...


0

found answer on android.stackexchange.com by user @Rat2000 on AskUbuntu.com: Open a terminal in Ubuntu(Ctrl+Alt+T) and type this commands: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:langdalepl/gvfs-mtp sudo apt-get update Then, launch Software Updater (previously known as Update Manager) and install the available updates. After you update everything restart ...


1

I got this and could manually mount the disc as iso9660 instead of udf. I think a recent update in Ubuntu must have change the default for dvd media sudo mount -t iso9660 /dev/sr0 /mnt


0

Your problem is that your home directory is encrypted. When you log in graphically, your home directory is decrypted automatically. This does not happen with ssh. You have to run ecryptfs-mount-private AFTER logging in via ssh. ecryptfs-mount-private cd ~ ls You will also have a problem is you try to use ssh keys. See ...


0

You can rename a blank casper-rw file to home-rw and use it in combination with a casper-rw file for a total of 8GB. In this case the casper-rw is similar to a "/" partition in a Full install and the home-rw file is similar to a "/home" partition in a Full install. I usually use casper-rw and home-rw partitions in my persistent flash drives. Rough ...


1

Not what you requested, but if it's just a matter of getting files off of the vdi, and you want a very quick solution: Run an ssh server on your host (apt-get install openssh-server && service ssh restart) Use VirtualBox to build a virtual machine from the existing vdi file, then boot up that virtual machine. (I just kept the default Network ...


1

When trying to mount a remote Ubuntu FDE drive while your current Ubuntu installation is also using FDE, both LVMs will have the same Volume Group name ubuntu-vg. This makes the second drive with the same volume name inaccessible do to a naming clash. This can be resolved by renaming the Volume Group name of the remote FDE drive: Boot to a live instance ...


0

Muru is right, you can not fully access a NTFS drive that is used by Windows for either hibernation or FastBoot. Windows somehow locks the volume so that you can only mount it with Ubuntu in read-only-mode. Boot back into Windows and shut it down completely. If necessary, also disable the FastBoot option.


1

Ensure your computer is plugged into the power Make a System Backup (You've just been promoted to User type 4) Boot from an Ubuntu Live-DVD or a gparted Live-CD Start gparted and you will see something like this: Click the right side of /dev/sda7 and drag it to the left (="shrink partition") Move the partitions around, so there is enough space to: ...


1

With your favorite text editor and root privileges, add the following line to /etc/fstab. /bakup/Music /home/george/Private none bind (replace george with your username) See this Server Fault post for the full answer.


1

Maybe you're doing the things in the wrong order. When you create a file system with mkfs.ext4, everything inside it is owned by user root and group root with your system default permissions set. When you mount that file system on a directory, you see file system permissions and owner, regardless of the original owner and permissions on that directory. So ...


-1

It`s manual - "How create EXT4 partition" http://superuser.com/questions/643765/creating-ext4-partition-from-console After you can add it on FSTAB. Add next text in end of file /etc/fstab: /dev/nvme0n1p1 /media/data ext4 defaults 0 2 Where /dev/nvme0n1p1 - your physical device, /media/data - your mountpoint. After use command mount -a for ...


2

I also have a PC that cannot boot from USB3. What I did was installed the Grub and /Boot to a USB2 Stick and then the rest of Ubuntu to an USB3 stick. By boot I press the F12 key for choosing to boot from the USB2 stick and from the boot menu there choosing any other installed system including Ubuntu. I sure hope this helps.


1

The question is a bit old by now, but still doesn't have an answer. So: It appears the folder /media/cdrom doesn't exists, that's why you get "mount point ... does not exist". Second, as /dev/cdrom is not included on fstab, if you want to mount it manually you must specify the type of filesystem with the -t parameter. Fortunately, there's an auto option. ...


1

Use gvfs-mount -d /dev/sdb1 as regular user.


1

The owner of the svn repository needs to be changed by: sudo chown --recursive camilstaps:plugdev /Path/To/Dir/* The FAT partition needs to be mounted using: UUID=EA08-6773 /media/data vfat gid=1000,uid=1000,dmask=027,fmask=137,nosuid,nodev,users 0 2


1

In case we need a partition to always mount at the same place, and to be reliably present it is recommended to auto-mount these partitions at boot or login. This can be done by an entry to your /etc/fstab file for mounting at system boot, or by using udisks if mounting should only happen on user login. See below questions on how to do that: For mounting ...



Top 50 recent answers are included