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0

This is just a hint! Because I came to this question and found an answer by myself. Sometimes you can use ls -lha /dev/mapper/ or similar to see the mapped devices and you can use mount to resolve it.


-2

Becuase NTFS designed for and by Microsoft. Microsoft rather None Standard solutions for ease of use and home user attraction


2

The Microsoft filesystems (NTFS and the FAT brothers) don't support UUIDs the way ext*/btrfs/other Unixy filesystems do. What you see reported as UUIDs are some sort of serial numbers (64 bits long for NTFS, 32 bits long for FAT32). The only concrete information I can dig up from the Linux world is from the ntfslabel(8) manpage: ...


5

Because those values aren't UUIDs; they're NTFS serial numbers. They're identified as UUIDs in /etc/fstab (and elsewhere) because the developers chose to use the identifier "UUID" for fundamentally non-UUID data, rather than use some other identifier. The same is true of FAT, by the way, but FAT serial numbers are even shorter than NTFS serial numbers.


5

Seems like your swap partition is wrongly or not formatted. (Or got damaged somehow) Reformat sda5 as SWAP (using GParted, parted or fdisk) and make sure the UUID in fstab matches the one from sudo blkid. Then run sudo swapon /dev/sda5 to enable swapping to this partition, if you don't want to reboot.


1

See Automatically Mount Partitions


0

I had received this error message after upgrading a bunch of packages failed to upgrade the kernel in full. I.e. dpkg -l | grep linux-image- showed me a linux-image-3.13.0-49-generic, but not the corresponding linux-image-extra-3.13.0-49-generic. The problem seems to be that the modules required to mount my disk were contained in the missing ...


0

The problem is triggered by Windows. Start Windows and disable Windows Fast Startup (if you have Windows 8). If you haven't Windows 8, try using chkdisk on the command prompt.


0

I find more cosy the use of lsblk instead of fdisk -l even because recently it is not always needed to specify the file system type a priory. Moreover I want to mimic the behaviour of the mounting through Device Notifier with the command line. Tested on Kubuntu 14.04 LTS. Step 1: Individuate from where To individuate where is I prefer to use lsblk (from ...


1

Making symbolic link is an excellent option in case you just need to keep the file in the required directory but dont have enough space in that directory.


0

Have you tried to use Acetone ISO to open this images? It's a very good tool. I can open big .img or .iso files with it. Also can you say type of this images? Possible you need to mount it manually with mount in loop. There is a very good explanation on how to it by hands: http://wiki.edseek.com/guide:mount_loopback And looks like there is a possible ...


0

The duplicate answer has most of what's necessary. Comments welcome. Plug it in to get the ids: lsusb replace the ids and tell it what scripts. ACTION=="add", ATTRS{idVendor}=="09da", ATTRS{idProduct}=="0260", OWNER="{userid}", RUN+="/usr/local/bin/usb-copy-add.sh" ACTION=="remove", ATTRS{idVendor}=="09da", ATTRS{idProduct}=="0260", OWNER="{userid}", ...


0

Update: I didn't provide the full correct solution before; what actually worked for me required to use gparted as well, which you can't use. This method should work (I tested it); you can ajdust each step to your needs and automate everything into the script: Create the blank raw image: dd if=/dev/zero of=/image.img bs=1 count=100000000 (100MB) Create the ...


2

Apparently your new home partition was mounted on both /home and /media/home when you ran rm -r /media/home. rm -r removes a directory recursively. It removes all the files in the directory first. It's possible to mount a device on multiple mount points simultaneously. If the new home partition was still (or automatically) mounted on /media/home when you ...


0

If this is windows 8 this may solve the issue please check you are not using hibernate and you have disabled fast boot feature as follow 1- search for power options 2- untick the fastboot options


1

It worked. I did a sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get update --fix-missing then rebooted the system and everything seems to be working properly Thanks for the help guys!


1

My solution is remount it to another path: $ sudo umount /dev/sdf $ sudo mount -o exec,defaults,-default_permissions /dev/sdf ~/usbdrive List all mounted drive: $ cat /proc/mounts


0

according to this LINK this is a kind of hardware error due to high temperature . can you try the solution to shutdown the PC and leave it till it cools up and tr again


0

Ubuntu doesn't use systemd, so x-systemd.automount won't work. I guess it is just interpreted as an invalid mount option. If you want to have your CIFS share mounted on-demand have a look at this: http://wiki.ubuntuusers.de/Autofs


2

Try this: Make your script: make a new text document and put this in: #!/bin/sh mkdir -p /path/to/custom-mount sudo umount /dev/sdaX ((This is the drive you want to mount in the custom location)) sudo mount -t filesystem-type -o rw /dev/sdaX /path/to/custom-mount Put this script under /etc/init.d. Make it executable by running sudo chmod -x ...


0

You got permission denied from ntfsfix because you didn't use sudo. Mount is telling you that it can't figure out what kind of filesystem it is ( which does not bode well for being able to access your filesystem at all ) and so it wants to you tell it with -t ntfs, but since it couldn't figure this out on its own, this likely won't work either because your ...


2

You can use one of the following commands to get information details about mounted devices: all different commands are used to getting different information in different manners, results ... dmesg sudo fdisk OR sudo fdisk -l sudo blkid lsblk mount lsusb usb-devices df -h


0

From your other question: Run sudo usermod -a -G sudo <username> to add your user back to the sudo group.


0

I found an article in the openSUSE wiki: https://en.opensuse.org/User:Tsu2/LXC_mount_shared_directory I followed the steps and it works now. Create host directory: mkdir /media/data/share && chmod 7777 /media/data/share Create directory in lxc container: mkdir /share Edit lxc config file on host: nano /var/lib/lxc/containername/config ...


-1

There are way too many existing symlinks in /home/phablet/.local to make feasible symlinking the whole /home/phablet directory structure. I tried, but received a bunch of permission denied errors and figured it would probably break things anyhow if I managed to do it. What does work, however, is doing the following: Copying each of the subdir of ...


1

I solved the same problem by adding the UID info as an admin user from my Linux machine, so my /etc/fstab line now looks like this: //192.168.1.X/Multimedia /media/dungeonmultimedia cifs uid=[linuxadminuser],username=[nasadminuser],password=[nasadminpass] 0 0


1

mount: block device /dev/sr0 is write-protected You're trying to burn to a DVD that's write protected. Perhaps it's already burned and a DVD-/+R?


0

You can use the -v flag to mount a volume from a directory. For example if the host system had a directory /tmp/foo that directory could be mounted INSIDE the container at /foo with the following command. docker run -t -i -v /tmp/foo:/foo ubuntu /bin/bash


0

It is really simpler than you think. All you have to do is that when installing the Ubuntu, you will see a page in the installation wizard called user settings. There you will fill up your system password and usernames. So down there you can see a check box says Encrypt my Home folder also All you have to do is that to check mark it and proceed as usual. It ...


1

If you use the nofail option in /etc/fstab, the system will look for your disk (and partition) on boot time. If the device is plugged, the filesystem will be mounted. If not, the boot will continue as normal. See arch wiki: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Fstab Example UUID=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX /myusbhdd ntfs nofail,auto,noatime,rw,user 0 0 ...


0

sudo fdisk -l to check which is the usb disk. In case, for example, of /dev/sdb1, then sudo mount -t vfat /dev/sdb1 path_to_mount_point more reference here.


-1

Try using "lsattr" to check for unwanted file system flags, maybe the immutable flag is set. sudo lsattr your-file.sh


0

One solution to this problem is to add the www-data user to the group which owns the file, then adjust the group permissions for the file using chmod , so that the group has write access.


2

The_Seppi's response answers your first question and is absolutely correct in that respect. As to the question of fixing the problem, chances are that one of two things is happening: There may be something wrong with the filesystem (filesystem damage). This can happen if you use the Windows "fast startup" feature, which is set by default. It's imperative ...


0

Make an image of the offending device with ddrescue - You will require enough storage space to hold the entire drive regardless of the amount of data you have (or had) stored on it in this case it appears you'll need 16GB to store a clone of /dev/sdb. ddrescue is the program that will be doing the work and if it's not installed we need to install it with ...


1

Open the file /etc/fstab in a text editor with elevated privileges. You should be able to recognise the EFI partition at once, as it will likely carry a label, such as this: # /boot/efi was on /dev/sda1 during installation UUID=xxxx-xxxx /boot/efi vfat defaults 0 1 In order to prevent automatical mounting, append the noauto flag to ...


3

You cannot create hardlinks across mount boundaries. You'll get something like: ln: failed to create hard link ‘X’ => ‘Y’: Invalid cross-device link


1

This message indicates that volume may not have unmounted properly when turning the machine off This can occur if the system is powered off without shutting down. To unmount the volume you should run these commands: sudo -i umount /dev/sdc6 To diagnose any errors then you can use this command: sudo -i fsck.exfat /dev/sdc6 To repair errors should use ...


1

You have probably hibernated your Windows. Boot into windows, disable fast shutdown in Windows, fully shut windows down properly (do not hibernate), and then boot into ubuntu and you will be able to mount drives properly.


0

Permissions were not set on the /media folder that allowed for Plex to see those drives. I updated the permissions and plex was able to read/write to those folders as expected.


0

This command in /etc/fstab should help: //server.domain.com/<shared_folder> /mnt/shared cifs uid=<username>,credentials=/home/<username>/.smbcredentials,iocharset=utf8,sec=ntlm,domain=AQUARIUS 0 0 In the file /home/<username>/.smbcredentials, use this format: username=<username without domain> password=<password>


1

None. You do not seem to have the usual ones, i.e., cdrom, cdrw, dvdrom, dvdrw, and sr0.


0

$lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 931.5G 0 disk ├─sda2 8:2 0 1K 0 part ├─sda5 8:5 0 7.9G 0 part [SWAP] └─sda6 8:6 0 452.6G 0 part / sr0 11:0 1 1024M 0 rom "rom" is here.


1

I see a problem with your commands: /dev/sdg1 in the 1st error. /dev/sdf in the 2nd error. g-io-error-quark, 19 means "Method name you invoked isn’t known by the object you invoked it on." So I would assume your 1st command has an invalid device and it should be /dev/sdf1. Regarding the superblock error: start here and read the link in post 2 So how ...


1

To answer the actual question: Yes, a software can write to a device directly but contrary to your assumption this doesn't destroy a file system since software also can read directly from the file system. If the software does everything right it would just be like reading and writing the usual (indirect) way. Remember that it just had to do what your system ...


0

What kind of Display Manager do you use? Have you tried to reconfigure it? you can do so by using the command: sudo dpkg-reconfigure gdm or sudo dpkg-reconfigure lightdm for the one you are using. Maybe hitting Alt+Ctrl+F1 to change to console mode and using the commands: sudo apt-get update sudo dpkg --configure -a sudo apt-get install -f sudo apt-get ...


0

I have just a bunch of wild guesses here since my experience is with debootstrap for Debian mostly. Have you tried running the offending command manually from a shell? This can often give more insights as to what is happening. This looks strange to me: chroot /home/user/test/chroot mount -t proc proc /proc. Is there really a chroot binary under ...


2

Here's your problem: Warning: /dev/sdb contains GPT signatures, indicating that it has a GPT table. However, it does not have a valid fake msdos partition table, as it should. Perhaps it was corrupted -- possibly by a program that doesn't understand GPT partition tables. Or perhaps you deleted the GPT table, and are now using an msdos partition table. Is ...


0

https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/gvfs/+bug/1160847: The workaround I am using: Add this rule to /lib/udev/rules.d/69-libmtp.rules #skip Nexus 4/10 for UT debug ATTR{idVendor}=="18d1", ATTR{idProduct}=="4ee2", GOTO="libmtp_rules_end" Add a new file to /etc/udev/rules.d called 99-android.rules # enable access to nexus devices ...


1

You formatted the USB disk wrongly: it has a Hidden HPFS/NTFS partition. Open gparted Navigate to the correct disk in the upper right corner: Go to device and choose create partition table and choose msdos Right-click the large empty square in the middle: and choose "format to" and take FAT32 Done! ;-)



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