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1

how-to using windows You can do this in Windows 7 & 8 using the command line. Open powershell in windows and run the following command. windows7: isoburn.exe [/Q] [<DVD drive letter>:] <disk image file name> Here's an example: isoburn.exe /Q e: "C:\Users\mchid\Desktop\ubuntu-14.04.iso" windows8: isoburn [/Q] [<DVD drive ...


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You need create a group (Or add both users to a X group) & add together users to group. Add permissions to group.


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With the command mount -o loop rootfs.ext3 /media/fuse/ you have already mounted a loop device via the file rootfs.ext3, that contains a file system image. The file system is mounted in /media/fuse.


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You are not doing anything wrong. This behavior in fdisk and gparted is expected since you formatted the entire raw device as a LUKS volume, so there is no partition table on the device. The partition table normally resides at the beginning of the device (and also the end of the device for GPT), but it is not strictly necessary if the whole device will be ...


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After upgrading to Jessie Debian the package must have changed. I removed guid=0 from the following fstab mount and it all worked correct again. //x.x.x.x/General/ /usr/local/share/general cifs uid=0,guid=0,rw,credentials=/etc/gen-cifspasswd 0 0


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To install the Linux software RAID you need to install the mdadm package. sudo apt-get install mdadm If you want to make a software RAID-0 from the three image files, you need to create loop devices for each image files: sudo losetup /dev/loop1 image1.img sudo losetup /dev/loop2 image2.img sudo losetup /dev/loop3 image3.img After you can create a ...


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Apparently I ran into this bug. Unsure why my installation worked that long (this bug is a year old and started on 14.04), but here is the fix: sudo nano /etc/default/grub.d/dmraid2mdadm.cfg Find the following line GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="$GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT $DMRAID2MDADM_TOAPPEND" and comment it out like this ## ...


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There is a feature (?) called Fast Startup which is turned on by default in Windows 8, 8.1 & 10. It is a setting that helps your PC start up faster after shutdown. Windows does this by saving system info to a file (hiberfil.sys) upon shutdown. Ubuntu detects this as a corrupt NTFS partition. Windows 7 also detects this as corrupt but repairs it making ...


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First you need to create directory where you can attach windows partition using mount command (for example /media/c for C:): sudo mkdir -p /media/c Now find out list of partition (click on System > Administration > Disks ) or use following command: sudo fdisk -l If /dev/hdb1 is NTFS partition. Now type following command: sudo mount -t ntfs ...


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If your main goal is to recover the files, I would first try the accepted solution at stackexchange. It is read-only so it sounds safe enough. Replace /dev/sdb1 with the name of the partition on your drive. Use parted -l to figure out the latter.


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If your system matches the basic requirements you could use zfs (8 GB RAM, 64-bit system): Add repo and update package list: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:zfs-native/stable sudo apt-get update Install package: sudo apt-get install ubuntu-zfs Create a striped vdev (with no redundancy, but you asked for RAID0): sudo zpool create vol0 ~/image[1-3].img ...


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There is many ways to do it. This are the best two ways. 1- If you want to show the ext partition in my computer use "Ext2Fsd" for download Click here You can have Ext2Fsd launch at every boot or only open it when you need it. While you can theoretically enable support for writing to Linux partitions, I haven’t tested this. I’d be worried about this ...


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I won't pretend to be able to make sense of the thicket of options you have given samba for the external HDD. Suffice it to say that I have a similar setup that works very well with just the following: path = /... force user = debian-transmission read only = No create mask = 0666 directory mask = 0777 veto files = /lost+found/ browsable = yes guest ok = Yes ...


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Here's what worked for me. I followed the instructions in your original link as well: What to do about "the disk drive for /dev/mapper/cryptswap1 is not ready yet or not present"? Then I randomly found a comment somewhere else that the UUID of the swap partition can change between reboots. So, opening /etc/crypttab, I replaced the long UUID ...


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It is because of Windows fast startup option. You need to disable it. In Windows, open your Control Panel, type "change what power buttons do" and select the link "Change what the power buttons do". Here select the link "Change settings that are currently unavailable", scroll down and uncheck "Turn on fast start-up (recommended)". Restart your computer ...


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I'm not entirely sure about why Ubuntu would see one USB versus another other than perhaps file system type or limitations in the guest addition USB handlers. The solution I use is to mount the USB drive (or partition) as an OSX volume and then access it from Ubuntu via VirtualBox. In other words, a bit roundabout compared to mounting the USB drive directly ...


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In my case solution was to add noperm option on the fstab entry


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Ubuntu has neat command udisksctl which allows looking up information with the info option on a block device specified with the -b flag. Now, if we scan the output of udiskctl for each block device from a to z, and search for the 'usb' string in it, we can be sure it is a USB device. Bellow is a script that does exactly that: #!/bin/bash FOUND=0 for var ...


1

Using find and awk #!/bin/bash # your code ... # The name of your MAXimum 1 drive in /media/$USER maximum1="MAXimum 1" if [ -z "$(find /media/$USER/ -maxdepth 1 ! -path /media/$USER/ -type d |\ awk '! /'"$maximum1"'/')" ] then echo "Hey, the only USB device is $maximum1" else echo "Hey, no USB pendrive in my I/O." fi # your code ... ...


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This (the syntax error) is caused by a Python version mismatch, as the syntax has changed between Python 2 and Python 3. Another user with the same problem had manually installed a newer version of python (version 3.2; the version installed through packages is 2.7) and he redirected /usr/bin/python to python3.2 -- a bad idea. Restoring the original link of ...


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you'll need a combination of tools, which I believe are bundled in the package smartmontools. This links holds a fairly nice plan. Your first step should be to evaluate the SMART report of each drive using smartctl. smartctl -a /dev/sdX assuming a standard SATA controller, with X being the actual drive identifier Your second step should be an ...


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The file /proc/mounts contains the neccessary information. For instance, there I have an entry for my jump drive /dev/sdb1 /media/xieerqi/Lexar vfat rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,uid=1000,gid=1000,fmask=0022,dmask=0077,codepage=437,iocharset=iso8859-1,shortname=mixed,showexec,utf8,flush,errors=remount-ro 0 0 Coma separated list of options and specificallyrw ...


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Command mount will list all mounted partitions and will indicate whether they are mounted read only (ro) or read-write (rw). There is no way to tell whether a filesystem is "healty" while mounted in a normal read-write mode. To determine whether a filesystem is healthy you need to use fsck (or a similar tool) and these require either unmounted filesystems ...


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Although I still do not know why this suddenly happened. I have found a workaround. Since running mount -a in the terminal mounts the NFS shares, it was suggested to me to add that command to /etc/rc.local and have it run automatically during the boot up. So edit /etc/rc.local and add mount -a before the exit 0 line. Now upon starting the client the NFS ...


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Found this question which answers it for me. Basically, Samba can do hostname lookups, while mount can't. I set the IP address instead of the hostname in /etc/fstab, and it worked like a charm.


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Interpose your own mount helper. Edit the 3rd field of the /etc/fstab entry from ciopfs to myciopfs then create the file /sbin/mount.myciopfs and do chmod a+rx on it. This script will be executed by mount when you manually or automatically mount the entry. It will pass most of the fstab line options to the script. Write a shell script in the helper file ...


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Change your ~/.smbcredentials user=myUser password=pass domain=WORK That's all ;) The problem occurs when you use the user name and the domain name together. And please revert the changes for ~/.smbcredentials chmod o-rwx,-x ~/.smbcredentials


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Bensel: It has been in my experience, when running from the LiveCD, you cannot remove the LiveCD for any reason and expect the system to stay up. Why not create a bootable USB thumbdrive to run off of and leave the CD-R for doing your updates? THAT should work, because the media with the system on it remains in place, while you perform the other ...


0

I had to struggle with the same problem. It was due to an missing entry in the fstab file. Lets say the bookmark is in folder /dev/sda1/bookmark. Then the bookmark only worked when I first opened the folder /dev/sda1 with the Explorer Window. After a restart the command lsblk -f showed that /dev/sda1 was not mounted, without mountpoint. Accessing ...


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You should be able to use the instructions here for this. The only difference; you will be mounting your new partition as you say in 3.


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How do I check whether my sdb and sdc drives is mounted? And if they are, where are they mounted? To find out what drives are mounted you can check /etc/mtab, which is a list of all devices mounted on the system. It can sometimes have various tmpfs and other things you aren't looking for mounted too, so I reccomend cat /etc/mtab | grep /dev/sd to get ...


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mount views all currently mounted disks. You can use mount /dev/sdXY /mnt/DISK to manually mount disks wher X stands for the disk number and Y is the partition number and "DISK" is the mount point. This "DISK" directory should be different for each disk and shoul exist before mounting


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You should first try to check if the storage device is recognized by your system. Disconnect your device then open a terminal and input ls /dev/ | grep sd and Enter. Now connect the device and input ls /dev/ | grep sd again and Enter. Now you should have two outputs. Compare them to each other. You should find an extra line (or two) in the second output. ...


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IMHO you should fully follow this guide and keep your swap file and data safely on your USB SLC disk. However, if you insist on putting the swap on the HDD, the only things you have to do differently is: Create a swap file on the HDD: sudo fallocate --length XY /media/szSomewhere/file.swap sudo chmod a+rw /media/szSomewhere/file.swap where X is the ...


0

Mount it using gphotofs Install gphotofs package: sudo apt-get install gphotofs Then create a directory wherever you prefer (i'm using /home/<user>/camera) mkdir /home/<user>/camera And use the following to mount it sudo gphotofs /home/<user>/camera notes replace <user> with your username


1

The answer to this is to set the sticky bit (t) of your directories. You set the sticky bit recursively on your data directory by: sudo chmod -R +t /media/data This restricts the right to delete or rename a file only to the owner of a file, although the directory might be publicly readable and writeable. The permissions string will after that look like ...


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I made a crazy mistake! When I edited fstab, by mistake I pasted UUID on the first line just before # /etc/fstab. wrong: UUID="9dd9d9a0-79f1-4fed-86ba-9a1b1ea3f1cc"# /etc/fstab: static file system information. correct: # /etc/fstab: static file system information.


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You run the system from LiveCD. It is not installed. That is the reason why you cannot "load" anything.


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Your issue is most likely that the GRUB bootloader was not correctly installed during initial set-up. To remedy this, you are going to have to reinstall Ubuntu; which, considering you have not yet booted into it, should be relatively unobtrusive. Do it the same way you installed previously, by selecting "Something Else..". However, when you get to the ...


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FTR, running: dolphin camera:/ Lets me grab files off my camera, it just wont show up in dolphin without that command line.


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Drives aren't labeled like Windows in Linux. You can create separate partitions and/or drives for each folder (directory) or you can stack them under "root" /. Any folder you don't allocate in a separate partition will by default be under the / folder as if you had a C: drive with \ folder. I set up with HDD in anticipation of getting a 256 or 500GB SSD ...


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In Linux, drives aren't X:, drives are "mounted" in folders. Instead of using D:, you'll use whatever folder you mount the drive on.


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Seems like it does want a UUID Recreated with: sudo mkswap /dev/sda5 Added to fstab: UUID=ee482d21-82e2-4666-aad2-07e4a9d14416 none swap sw 0 0 Run: sudo swapon --all Checked with: sudo free total used free shared buffers cached Mem: 8077992 6407896 1670096 201436 249436 905480 -/+ ...


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You can check the filesystem type by file command: file -sL /dev/sd* The usage of -s is explained in file - Linux/Unix command and here is an excerpt: "This is useful for determining the filesystem types of the data in raw disk partitions, which are block special files." Besides, I mounted successfully without specifying -t type.


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So the problem is the total - 0GB, the only difference I could find is that on my (Fedora) system fstab looks like this: /dev/mapper/fedora-swap swap swap defaults 0 0 The /dev part is different because I use LVM, the difference is in the second parameter, at you that is none, here is swap


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Okay, first of all, let's make your Ubuntu Login a sudo user. sudo usermod -U username And try to mount it from the User.


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If you give the command apropos ntfs you will find there's a man page man mount.ntfs describing the command and driver which will be used when you mount a filesystem of type ntfs. If you just want all files to appear as if they belong to you, just change the /etc/fstab entry field auto to auto,permissions, or if this doesnt work when mounting via nautilus ...


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The "Disks" utility is a front end for fstab! The issue you're having is that "nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show" doesn't seem to work with ext4, change to "defaults" and it should work fine! Had exactly the same issue.


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This is because you did not set your drive to mount automatically. You can do it by adding a line to /etc/fstab. When you click your drive in file manager, it gets mounted.


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I have two data partitions that I mount at boot with /etc/fstab. However, I dual boot with Fedora. I do not want that to mount on boot (or Xubuntu from Fedora). Therefore, I just use udisks to mount those when I need to ('X' indicates partition number). sudo udisks --mount /dev/sdX You can then set an alias or a keyboard shortcut for the command if ...



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