New answers tagged

0

@cas' comment in comments is more strict than gvfs-mount because it has also label option, thus avoiding possible complications better; I think Ubuntu use's the label option for stability so I doubt if gvfs-mount --mount is used at all by default mount -L MasiWeek /media/masi/MasiWeek


1

Linux systems don't mount hard drives, they mount filesystems that live inside partitions or logical volumes on those drives. In the case of ext2/ext3/ext4 filesystems, you can change the UUID using the tune2fs command. From man tune2fs: -U UUID Set the universally unique identifier (UUID) of the filesystem to UUID. The format of the UUID ...


0

UUID can't be assigned manually, as far as I know. It's generated algorithmically during a format, to ensure it's globally unique, and being able to change it to an arbitrary value would allow duplications. Editing /etc/fstab can tell the OS to automatically mount a drive during startup. This preferably uses UUID to identify the drive. The existing UUID ...


0

So I continue researching and found this post http://askubuntu.com/a/161457/573024 which granted me access to my data after all. I'm copying data to an external disk and then I reboot and see if data is accessible still.


0

Funny you ask, because I saw that today in our lab just today. Drives are lettered in the order they are found, sda, sdb, and so forth. Those letterings can be shifted when new devices are inserted. If the old config is looking for a partition in a place, but it finds MS Windows instead, for example, then blam! If you put settings in /etc/fstab using ...


0

This really isn't recommended, as programs will store configuration files in your home directory. If a program has different versions on each OS, this can lead to bugs and data loss. It can also, as you noticed, cause problems when programs need access to files somewhere within your home directory before it's mounted. It's better to link directories like ...


0

Attaching a raw disk image should be possible by creating a raw vmdk. In the VirtualBox images directory (like /home//VirtualBox) VBoxManage internalcommands createrawvmdk -filename rawtest.vmdk -rawdisk /path/to/disk.img Attaching the virtual disk to a virtual virtual machine should be possible after that. The path /path/to/disk.img can also point to a ...


0

Run the following in Ubuntu's terminal: sudo mount /dev/sdxx /mnt cd /mnt for i in `find . -name *` do if [[ -r $i ]] then echo "$i is ok!" cp -f "$i" "/path/to/different/disk/that/is/uncorrupted/" else echo "$i is not ok." If it does say $i is not ok, you have no chance of recovering that folder.


2

welcome, assuming you are using a 4 gb RAM computer, you will have delete that 500GB patition indicating SWAP , the right click on the unlocated new 500Gb which will appear in grey color and allocated 4 gb as swap by selecting file system as Linux-Swap in G-Parted and click add, the remaining vlume you will create a new file system by right clicking on it ...


3

The reason you cant view it is because its been allocated for swap which is a waste allocating it 500GB its good to allocate it a size equal to RAM size of your PC. Re partition that 1Tb disks 500GB extended prtition in live mode by using Gparted and allocated a memory slightly equal to your RAM size then the rest you can use it for other purposes.doing this ...


1

Rinzwind: my stripped-down script I posted in the question above doesn't show it, but there's a problem with the 'pmount' solution. The problem is that it only appears to be able to mount to /media. The full script is more complicated: it creates a 500MB large image file (image of a USB pendrive), partitions it into 2 partitions (FAT32 and Ext3) , mounts ...


3

Use pmount instead of mount. pmount ("policy mount") is a wrapper around the standard mount program which permits normal users to mount removable devices without a matching /etc/fstab entry. Probably want the ... -w, --read-write Force the device to be mounted read/write. If neither -r nor -w is specified, the kernel will choose an ...


0

Intro First of all for anyone who is having the same issue on Ubuntu 16.04, it is currently an ongoing bug and as of now, to my knowledge, has not been fixed. You can visit the github conversation here to see the bug I am referencing. Secondly I am writing this post as an enthusiast and intermediate linux user, I am not a developer or currently work on ...


4

The equivalent to the Ubuntu GUI's mount action for removable media would be gvfs-mount -d device or gvfs-mount --device=device where device is a block device such as /dev/sdb. Note that this command is executed as the owner of the current desktop session, and will mount the device into a directory such as /media/<user>/<label> rather than to ...


6

Your script is not working because of a spelling error in the definition of PARTITION. Because of this, PARTITION is empty (while PARTION contains what you want) and /dev/$PARTITION becomes /dev/. Note that the variable $USER already contains the username, so no need to set it (unless you want to do the mounting from a different user).


0

try to use this in terminal sudo apt-get install ntfsprogs sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdXY where XY is the name of the drive for example sda4


0

try to use this in terminal sudo apt-get install ntfsprogs sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdXY where XY is the name of the drive for example sdc1


0

try to use this in terminal sudo apt-get install ntfsprogs sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdc2


0

try to use this in terminal sudo apt-get install ntfsprogs sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdXY where XY is the name of the drive


0

Here is what worked for me for future askers. -A INPUT -s 172.16.10.25/32 -d 172.16.10.40/32 -i eth0 -p tcp --sport 111 -j ACCEPT -A INPUT -s 172.16.10.25/32 -d 172.16.10.40/32 -i eth0 -p tcp --sport 2049 -j ACCEPT -A INPUT -s 172.16.10.25/32 -d 172.16.10.40/32 -i eth0 -p udp --sport 111 -j ACCEPT -A INPUT -s 172.16.10.25/32 -d 172.16.10.40/32 -i eth0 -p ...


1

/dev/sdb is the entire block device, you don't mount this. You mount a partion that is on the device, example: sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt From the first image, it looks as if there are no partitions on the disk any way, or you have recently made some changes to the partiton table and the kernel is not aware of them, so it is best to run sudo ...


1

New hard drives need to have a new partition created on them so that they can be used. I recommend using gparted. To install the program, type in the following from a terminal window: sudo apt install gparted Then gparted needs to be ran with elevated permissions: sudo gparted After your drive is configured, now you need to mount it somewhere. If ...


0

source What is meant by mounting a drive? Before your computer can use any kind of storage device (such as a hard drive, CD-ROM, or network share), you or your operating system must make it accessible through the computer's file system. This process is called mounting. You can only access files on mounted media. Formats and mounting Your ...


4

Yes. It uses the label name for the partition, or the partition's unique ID if no label exists, for the mounted directory.


0

I have a dell laptop, and the default windows partion is called OS. I think this is so your laptop will boot from the partition as maybe the laptop is restricted to only booting from a specific partition. I am proabaly incorrect. It also seems like it has boot files so don't delete it


0

You found the initial problem that was causing Ubuntu emergency mode. It was trying to mount a dirty Windows partition in fstab. That happened because the NTFS file system was "dirty". It needs a chkdsk run on it from Windows, or, delete the NTFS partition from Ubuntu using gparted, and recreate the NTFS partition from a running Windows system. Cheers, Al


1

It sounds like using lsusb shows that the drives are being detected, but you're not seeing them mounted on the desktop, or in Nautilus, correct? It looks like one drive has a corrupted partition, and the other has a series of bad blocks that looks like a possible head crash. If the data on these two drives is replaceable via a backup, or the data is not ...


0

Ok, I just resolved: first I commented out the windows mounting instruction for the boot /etc/fstab, then I was able to start the system normally.


1

I did a Google on "WD Caviar Green 2TB disable energy saving" and found a number of hits. It probably has to do with the WD's attempt at saving energy by parking the heads, or spinning down the drive. You might look at: http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/1367904 http://serverfault.com/questions/242891/disable-caviar-green-drives-spinning-down which ...


1

Most important things first: Backups should always be stored in another place than the system they were created from. Transfer them to your local box or a backup space or even some cloud storage like box.com or Dropbox or similar. Now to the discs: Both discs are in a raid setup. This allows the system to work even if one of the discs fails. It is not a ...


0

A mounted file system should stay mounted. If you want to keep your mounted fs after a reboot/power failure, etc, you can make an entry for the fs in /etc/fstab. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Fstab regards


0

The error may be because of the user with which you are trying to login to the server. The user may be having no login shell configured.


0

I've done this with external HDDs using Ubuntu 16.04, 14.04 and 12.04, I'm assuming that is what you're attempting. I recommend using these as a base to troubleshoot from, then if needed remount the drive. I start with Gparted to identify the device, usually its /dev/sdb1 or similar. Then I find the device, there is a drop down in the top right (at the ...


0

Below are some examples. lvs -o +devices lvdisplay -m lvdisplay | awk '/LV Name/{n=$3} /Block device/{d=$3; sub(".*:","dm-",d); print d,n;}'


1

I've had similar problems and found that zeroing out the live usb with dd before reformatting prevents such issues: sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sd[x] where x should be replaced by the letter of the usb device (e.g. sdb)


2

Mountpoints for other partitions should be in /media Make a new mountpoint for your NTFS partition: mkdir /media/windows or if not windows then whatever you prefer to call it Now edit your fstab to correspond to that mountpoint: UUID=5CB5FBB62D2AA5D5 /media/windows ntfs rw,auto,users,exec,nls=utf8,umask=003,gid=46,uid=1000 0 0 On reboot the ...


0

To create a mount point first, run "sudo mkdir /media/drive_name", in place of "drive_name", choose anything you like Now in terminal run "sudo nano /etc/fstab" #/etc/fstab: static file system information. # #Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a #device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices #that ...


0

It sounds like we are talking about 2 different computers as opposed to 16.04 vs 14.04, I see mention of chrome in dmesg, it may be that this computer doesn't have enough power to supply an external HD judging by dmesg getting to the point where it says [sdc] Spinning up disk... but then gets no further, if your external HD does not have it's own separate ...


0

The solution was to add this secret-disk /dev/sda3 none luks to the /etc/crypttab file as admin and reboot. The passphrase will be requested, and the encrypted partition unlocked.


0

I was using udisks to mount an NTFS partition on the same disk as the OS. My command looked like this /usr/bin/udisks --mount /dev/disk/by-uuid/ I used this command in 16.04 (mint 18): udisksctl mount --block-device /dev/disk/by-uuid/


0

The fdisk output shows that there is no partition on your usb device. your usb stick is the 14 GB one right? if it is follow this instruction: These instruction will destroy all files on the device Open the device with fdisk: sudo fdisk /dev/sdb First to create a new partition table: Press o then press the enter. To create a new partition: press n ...


0

Have you removed the drive and re-inserted it after formatting? It might of unmounted after formatting. Or make a temporary folder called usb or something in your home directory and try mounting it there. mount /dev/sdb/ /home/your-username/usb


2

Hopefully, the NTFS partition's list of locations on the disk where the data for each file lies is correct. The fix under that condition is fairly easy if you can copy the files to a different drive. Here's how: Remount the drive read-only The first thing to do is to stop all writing to the drive. Remount it read-only by opening a terminal (press Ctrl+Alt+...


2

First, see if it's showing up in /dev. To do this, UNPLUG the device, and type: sudo partprobe ls /dev/sd* Then, PLUG IN the device and type that command, again. Notice what's different. You should have an additional sdX letter, and perhaps some partitions on that device, such as sdX1. (Replace X with b, c, d, e, etc., as appropriate.) If you do, ...


0

Try using gparted! It usually works for me. Or use lsusb to see what's attached. fdisk -l for more info


1

First, you have to check whether the flash drive is recognized or not. We do that by using the lsblk command, on terminal. Example: ritesh ~> lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 111.8G 0 disk ├─sda1 8:1 0 512M 0 part /boot/efi ├─sda2 8:2 0 107.4G 0 part / └─sda3 8:3 0 3.9G 0 part [SWAP] sdc 8:...


0

If you're setting up new partitions on the new drive, you'd might as well use encrypted partitions with cryptsetup / LUKS. eCryptfs and EncFS are for encrypting some folders on a filesystem, LUKS is for encrypting an entire partition. See archwiki for a good overview of different disk encryption systems. With the new partition(s) encrypted, then you can ...


0

I had a problem with my new GoPro Hero, could not see pictures or video from the sd card, I tried everything. Used a different computer (both with Ubuntu 16.04) and everything worked great. The only difference was the one that worked did NOT have VLC installed. Pulled up the photos with Imageviewer, and the video with Videos (Totem). Went back to the ...


0

You can limit the output shown by fdisk (excluding the RAM disks) by using the following: $ sudo fdisk -l /dev/sd* or, on older systems: $ sudo fdisk -l /dev/hd*


2

List backup superblocks: sudo dumpe2fs /dev/sda1 | grep -i backup then use backup superblock, 32768 just an example, try several sudo fsck -b 32768 /dev/sda1 One user could not get partition unmounted (may have needed swapoff), but used another live distro Only the newer fdisk in 16.04 will correctly show gpt partitions. Use parted or gdisk. sudo ...



Top 50 recent answers are included