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After some additonal testing I found the solution myself: kpartx sudo kpartx -a raspberry-backup-2014-04-10.img This command created /dev/mapper/loop0p1 and /dev/mapper/loop0p2. Afterwards these partitions can be mounted straight forward: sudo mount -o rw -t ext4 /dev/mapper/loop0p2 mount_target/


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I think the problem is that unlike $UID, $GID is not a bash built-in variable. Instead, you may be able to use $(id -g) i.e. sudo mount -t vboxsf -o uid=$UID,gid=$(id -g) shared ~/host or (for consistency) sudo mount -t vboxsf -o uid=$(id -u),gid=$(id -g) shared ~/host


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MTP mode wont work. It's an abstracted filesystem meaning Photorec (et al) don't have direct access. According to the Photorec website, you'll need to throw the phone into Mass Storage mode. Once you've done that, it should see the drive correctly. I'm not sure what sort of recovery you're doing here. If the screen is broken and you're stuck in MTP mode, ...


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It sounds like your drive is damaged: [ 372.444424] end_request: I/O error, dev sdb, sector 250589039 Here are some things to try: Attach the drive to a Windows machine and run a checkdisk there. NTFS checks are probably better under Windows (this is an assumption). Run ntfsck. On Debian systems, /sbin/fsck.ntfs is a symlink to /bin/ntfsfix but this ...


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The easiest way to do this is to add your NAS to your file dialog. From there you will be able to access your NAS directories. To do this you need to bookmark the directory in the NAS for the filemanager to remember the location. Browse to the directory in the file manager, then bookmark it: How to add custom links in the left pane of Nautilus? Now when ...


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"Removable drives" probably refers to something like SATA drives that can be hot-plugged, like on a server, maybe eSATA as well. "Removable media" probably means more along the lines of USB devices. There is probably a difference between mounting a USB device and mounting a SATA device. USB drives are generally mounted automatically (optionally in this ...


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mount - mount a filesystem -o, --options Options are specified with a -o flag followed by a comma separated string of options. remount Attempt to remount an already-mounted filesystem. This is commonly used to change the mount flags for a filesystem, especially to make a readonly filesystem writeable. It does not change device or mount point. The ...


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By default only devices mounted in "/media" will be shown in the sidebar. And whan there is no fstab entry those devices will be mounted in "/media". So change /mnt/extra_storage to /media/extra_storage and Nautilus will pick it up. There is also a dconf setting that can be set to prevent mounting:


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You're looking for the -t flag for mount. From man mount: -t, --types vfstype [...] More than one type may be specified in a comma separated list. The list of filesystem types can be prefixed with no to specify the filesystem types on which no action should be taken. (This can be meaningful with the -a option.) For example, the ...


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I just found out that the -t option to mount can be used in conjunction with -a, such that sudo mount -a -t cifs does what I need. (sudo mount -a -t cifs -o remount works as well, for remounting after permission / password changes.)


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Maybe open files are preventing the unmounting process. I'm not sure if that's the correct behavior. I would expect mount will show the network share still mounted. Run lsof +D /mnt/storageHDD/MySQL/data/netMNT to list the open files in your mountpoint, then you can try to kill the associated process.



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