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A good place to start is to track the statistics in /proc/meminfo, this has a considerable amount of detail on global memory utilisation. I suggest capturing the output from /proc/meminfo periodically (say every 30 minutes or so) and one can then examine this to see where the memory allocation growth is occurring. From that, you will have at least some ...


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Run this command sudo top Find out the culprint process and then kill it sudo kill -9 <pid> Also look for some of the services that might be always running. For more details, refer to this link


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Before: proc.Start() Add a handler method. For example: process.OutputDataReceived += (sender, a) => Console.WriteLine(a.Data); and replace this line: ret = proc.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd() with this: process.BeginOutputReadLine(); As an alternative you might also simply try adding only process.BeginOutputReadLine() after ret = ...


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You will probably find most of the memory in use is in the buffer cache. The default configuration for Linux is to cache file data in memory when memory is available. When memory pressure increases (that is, more applications demand memory) then the data in the cache is discarded in an orderly manner if it is not dirty or flushed (written) to disk if it is ...


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After restart immediately launch the terminal and issue the command free -m Then look at values in the second row(-/+ buffers/cache:). Under second column(used) you'll see the actual RAM consumption of your system.


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Install sysstat package Read man pidstat, look at option & for example commands go to bottom of man page. Ex. of nautilus, current id here as reported by ps is 2286, generating 120 reports 60 secs apart, outputting to a log in home folder Get process id you want to track, many ways, a couple below - (start process/app find in list ps axu If you ...



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