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There is no point in not using available RAM. Linux uses RAM that is not used by applications e.g. as disk cache to speed up disk access. If more RAM for apps is needed Linux shrinks the disk cache appropriately. In the output of free the line starting with -/+ buffers/cache tells you the amount of RAM that is/could be used by apps. In your example 1.0G ...


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Because there isn't a good way to do this. Consider: How is Ubuntu supposed to know how much memory something should or shouldn't have? How much should be reserved? What applications do we kill off first? What if terminating your application meant you lost data? You can set your own limits in various ways but there isn't a good way for Ubuntu to Just ...


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First off, like @CassioSposito said, you are using 32-bit Ubuntu. You should really be using 64-bit if your processor supports it. Ubuntu likes eating up RAM because it likes caching things. Ubuntu, in other words, likes storing stuff in memory because it's faster to read/write. It also likes doing this because it doesn't like wasting valuable RAM. The ...


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You are using a x86 system and your RAM is more than 4Gb. This system cannot manage rhis amount. If you have a VGA Card this memory address also are include in 4Gb limits.I recommend a x64 version for more accurate results.


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Try using Xubuntu, which is an official Ubuntu derivative that uses the more lightweight Xfce desktop environment. I did and it really works good! :)


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Probably the files in your system have a different format/naming or you use the -S argument but do not point to a .../proc. If the SMAPS is not present in /proc/$pid/ you'll also have nothing displayed. smem requires /proc/$pid/smaps, /proc/$pid/cmdline, /proc/$pid/stat, /proc/meminfo, /proc/version. You can find more info on /proc on the man pages of ...


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From the manpages: free, vmstat free displays the total amount of free and used physical and swap memory in the system, as well as the buffers used by the kernel. The shared memory column should be ignored; it is obsolete. vmstat reports information about processes, memory, paging, block IO, traps, and cpu activity. The first report ...


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Here's a fairly sensible guide from The Linux Questions Wiki Almost every Linux system will need swap space. The classic piece of advice is "swap should be double the amount of RAM you have", though this is not a rigid guideline. Another guideline is to have at least 1x your RAM size, but this also isn't a fixed, absolute requirement (this used to be ...


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Swap of 500 MB to 1 GB should be fine. I made swap of 500 MB at the time of installation and have not faced any problem so far. I have 2 GB RAM.


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As far as I know, you can't in a strict way (unless using some kind of virtual machine or using cgroups which is not so easy; you can see this answer from @muru.). You can limit the memory available with ulimit, but this will simply have the effect of telling your program that there is no more memory when doing an allocation, or crashing it with a signal ...


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You can do this with the ulimit command, here's it's manpage .



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