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18

In your case, the correct selection is /dev/sda, the first one. It's the first and only hard disk in your system, whereas /dev/sda1 is a partition on that hard disk. You can install grub on a partition, but it's a "BAD idea". If you had multiple hard drives and paritions, first find out where your root partition is: df | grep /$ You can then install grub ...


12

Yes, sure. $ dd if=/dev/sda of=mbr bs=512 count=1 1+0 records in 1+0 records out 512 bytes (512 B) copied, 0.000188571 s, 2.7 MB/s $ stat -c %s mbr 512 $ hd mbr 00000000 eb 48 90 d0 bc 00 7c 8e c0 8e d8 be 00 7c bf 00 |.H....|......|..| 00000010 06 b9 00 02 fc f3 a4 50 68 1c 06 cb fb b9 04 00 |.......Ph.......| 00000020 bd be 07 80 7e 00 00 7c 0b ...


8

Could you create a Bootinfo Summary report using the boot-repair tool as described below and then post the link to the report? I know you have already provided some details about your boot configuration. However, the report I am asking for contains more detailed information and might give us a better understanding of why you are unable to boot Windows ...


7

See: http://www.digital-experts.de/doc/mbr/REASDME . 4. The boot process ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ When the MBR is first loaded it waits for a configurable length of time (1 second by default), monitoring the keyboard, for key presses. If the MBR detects a key press, it will interrupt the boot process, and display it's prompt. Otherwise, it will ...


6

Use fdisk. Put it into sector mode with the u command, then p to print the table, d to delete the partition, and then n to recreate it. When you recreate it, use the same starting sector, but an ending sector that actually fits within the disk. When you are done and have double checked ( p again ), save and quit with w.


6

I'm the author of gdisk, and I agree with what psusi has written, with the caveat that I can't know what's really on /dev/sda5, so I can't say if it's safe to remove it. If it's the stuff that you've burned to your recovery DVDs, it should be safe to delete it, though. If there's sufficient free space on /dev/sda5 (about 17 KiB), you should be able to ...


5

Just execute sudo update-grub and sudo update-initramfs -u. And it should be done. In case that your Windows is located on /dev/sda1 the sudo update-grub command should contain Windows 7 (loader) auf /dev/sda1 gefunden (German localization)


4

Installing grub to the mbr will not affect the partition table, so the recovery partition will remain intact and an entry for the recovery partition will be automatically added to the grub menu so that you can boot from it if needed.


4

Install the MBR to the disk with Ubuntu on it and configure the BIOS to boot from Ubuntu's disk instead of the Win7 one. Since you cannot boot into Ubuntu, you'll need the Live CD to boot and repair things. Boot from the Live CD. Mount the partition containing the Ubuntu installation (by opening it in the file browser for example) Open a Terminal Run the ...


4

What is a partition table? How is it related to Windows 8? In addition to general partitioning, it should be noted that information about partitions are stored in a partition table on the hard disk. The whole topic didn't receive much attention because DOS/Windows computers – where one would install Linux onto – just had one choice for almost three ...


3

The answer to your first question is yes, because I am doing it now. I would guess it's probably a Microsoft design decision to encourage adoption of UEFI, rather than a technical reason. UEFI allows Secure Boot and similar stuff that is more important to MS than to its customers. I don't know of a way to let windows boot from GPT with a legacy BIOS, but ...


3

Yes, it does look like a typical MBR error message. I ended up with a similar situation, although I was able to reinstall grub from a liveCD and then boot into Ubuntu well enough. (I don't know if your boot repair program reinstalls grub; if not, I'll post the instructions below. I can't take credit for them, but I don't know any longer where I got them.) ...


3

If you had really important files in your Vista partition, then stop doing anything. If you had erased your files, each time that you write to you're disk recovery will be harder. Go to some professional that can help you to recover the files. If the files are not so important, i.e. you don't want to pay to recover them, the first thing to do is to know ...


3

It's an alignment thing For performance reasons you really want your storage to be aligned on all levels. While this is probably just a simple hard drive with a partition table and a file system on it directly, it's still important to not misalign it. What about alignment? Suppose your hard drive works with 4 kB sectors (yours appear to work with 512 ...


3

Try EasyBCD. EasyBCD is an advanced GUI application that makes it easy to modify the Windows bootloader and the entries in it. Choose BCD Deployment, and write the MBR.


3

I have solved this with a Boot-Repair disk (I put it on a USB flash-pen, but one can burn it on a disk if necessary). I had used the program mainly to repair the grub in linux, but it has an option to repair the MBR. So, boot into the Boot Repair disk/usb, and check "Restore MBR" (instead of "Reinstall GRUB"). It works fine, the normal boot in Win7 is ...


3

Answer written by the OP in one edit: After hours of GRUB trouble, this these lines solved it in seconds: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair && sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair


3

First, your partition table appears to have two active partitions, which may prevent your computer from booting even if you fix the problem of the MBR. Windows's MBR boot is kind of funky because it uses a "default" MBR to load the MBR of the active partition. Before you change the boot records, try unmarking one of the partitions and booting. If that ...


2

Should work just fine. If you want to see what the 776MB are, take a look into the folder /ext4a using nautilus or a terminal. Because it is mounted it will have an entry in the file /etc/fstab. Edit it and delete the entry for /dev/sda1 respectively /ext4a. You are also right about sda5 and sda6. sda5 is the root mount point /. That means everything that ...


2

Technically, no hybrid MBR is OK; hybrid MBRs are a clear violation of the GPT specification. Whoever invented them should be ashamed of him/herself. Unfortunately, they're a practical necessity for dual-booting OS X and Windows on Macs. (That may change with Windows 8, though.) That said, within the usual informal rules for a hybrid MBR, the one that ...


2

If you have a usb thumb drive, you can use penndrivelinux from windows to make it bootable with an applicable distribution. From there you can fix it using boot-repair. Please see: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair http://www.pendrivelinux.com/


2

Ok it seems that it is not a problem of MBR in my case. On a Mac there are GPT and MBR. You must use the Disk utility of Mac OSX to make all partitions because this is the only tool which is able to synchronise GPT and MBR (they are note made to work together, it is usually one of them). I think it was my problem because I succeed, even in putting grub on ...


2

This not really an "answer". The content would be a better match to a comment, but is too long-winded to fit in one. Apologies :-( Some questions just to make sure I am reading your question correctly. (Please update/edit your question if you any further info to add.) You say "I installed grub manually onto the hard disk (/dev/sda)." So you have already ...


2

Have a look at this post. If you installed ubuntu using a USB, then grub may have been installed to the usb, try booting with the usb connected. If you then see grub and can boot ubuntu, follow our solution in the above link or look at this page on my website for more details. If not you could try booting the live ubuntu disc and using boot repair.


2

If you use the fixmbr command in Windows, then assuming it succeeds, it will write the Windows boot loader to the Master Boot Record. That will overwrite the part of GRUB (Ubuntu's boot loader) that is installed to the MBR, and you will not have an option to boot Ubuntu. However, that's not usually a big problem, as it's quite easy to put Ubuntu's boot ...


2

This is not a partitioning problem -- your partition table appears to be fine. It is instead a filesystem problem, and in particular a problem with NTFS, which is a Windows filesystem. If you're sharing this disk with Windows, NTFS can be a reasonable choice, but if the disk is used only with Linux, NTFS is a poor choice, and your problem illustrates why: ...


2

It's possible and it's easier than you think. Linux can boot fine from a GPT disk in BIOS mode, so there's no need to do the MBR-to-GPT conversion. With any luck, all you'll need to do is to install a BIOS-mode boot loader (GRUB, LILO, or SYSLINUX) to the disk. There are three caveats, though: I've never used LUKS, so I'm not sure how this would affect ...


2

I figured out the exact way by myself. Rod Smith was right, its easier that I thought. Here the solution if anybody else needs it: Original Partition Layout: /dev/sda1 (EFI Partition) /dev/sda2 (Boot Partition) /dev/sda3 (LVM2/LUKS encrypted Root & Swap) Convertig to BIOS boot: I deleted the EFI Partition and created a new partition with the ...


2

The problem is that you currently have two Ubuntu installations, each with their own grub.cfg, but only one grub installation. When you boot your computer, grub loads and reads the grub.cfg from OS #2. To make it so that grub reads from OS #1's grub.cfg you need to install grub from within OS #1. In addition you want to make sure that OS #2 is not configured ...


2

If you want to boot an ISO file in an easy fashion you normally use a tool like unetbootin or others availiable at the http://www.pendrivelinux.com/ web site. If you want to boot just ISO files specifically you could set up grub2 on a flash drive and use the 'boot iso feature' of grub2. The issue with this method is each disrto seems to have its own ...



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