Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

You should have the tool cryptsetup already installed. To show details of the current cipher you can run the following command: sudo cryptsetup status sda5_crypt Replacing sda5_crypt with the name of your encrypted volume. You should see an output similar to this: type: LUKS1 cipher: aes-xts-plain64 keysize: 512 bits device: /dev/sda5 ...


0

until this bug is resolved, you can try to first kill plymouth. Unfortunately, there is no easy way to determine the PID of plymouthd. But plymouth knows how to quit itself :-) So the following should be sufficient. plymouth --quit; echo -ne "keyphrase" > /lib/cryptsetup/passfifo


0

Yes, this is possible. As mentioned by @muldune, you can use a Yubikey to perform 2FA encryption with LUKS. Have a look at my AskUbuntu answer here.


2

TrueCrypt. There is no good reason not to use it. It works great and if you consider what secret agencies of the US can force people to do, the fact that it is discontinued by its original developer(s) is actually a good thing. There are endeavors to find any kind of security issues and there haven't been found any as of yet.


1

Run ecryptfs-unwrap-passphrase at the terminal screen and write down the output for disaster recovery. type ecryptfs-unwrap-passphrase in the terminal screen it will prompted you with "Passphrase:", it wants your user login password The output will look like this example "1b6acbada5e3a61ebe324a4745e61ba8" the 32 character output is your "passphrase" ...


0

The answer is NO. There is only 1 core being used. So a fancy 8 core or 4 core system won't be showing its full potential. And this post is 3 years old. And still no improvement on that.


0

next time try a lazy umount umount -l /<folder> This works for me most of the times, especially useful with hung-up NFS-drives.



Top 50 recent answers are included