Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

42

Well I don't see why people are making a fuss about the quality of the question. It's clearly a decision that lots of developers will want to weigh up before deploying. And there are clearly some differences that are very relevant to deploying each. I think the prime consideration and comparison between debian stable and an Ubuntu LTS is security and ...


22

When 12.04 LTS comes out (in mid/end April), it is still 'just another' release in the release cycle. Meaning it brings new and fresh things with it. Now it's up to you - and you alone - if you want to keep the LTS for the full support time, or as soon as 12.10 gets released, to upgrade to it. In any case though, if you want to stay on 11.10 and hop on ...


20

No, but also yes. You will receive 5 years support on packages Ubuntu provides support for this term. Lubuntu shares packages with Ubuntu in a sense that "underlying" "base" software like Alsa, the kernel, common shared libraries and such are from the same archive and maintained by the same people. Lubuntu is nothing more than Ubuntu with another set of ...


19

You could install aptitude if it isn't already installed. It's a great tool for managing packages in a headless setup. Otherwise if you just want to see what's going to happen when you run something, use the --dry-run argument and it won't actually do anything, it'll just tell you what it would do: From the apt-get man page -s, --simulate, ...


18

To answer your question about Professional/Production use I think there are several key elements that have been addressed but there is one point I feel that is extremely crucial. Packages and Package Management This is a key difference between Debian stable and Ubuntu LTS especially if your concerned about longevity, uptime, stability etc. Ubuntu is ...


17

If you go to Ubuntu > System > Administration > Update Manager, you'll see a Settings... button at the bottom left of the dialog. In the dialog, switch to the Updates tab and uncheck the updates checkboxes and set Release Upgrade to "Long Term Support Releases Only". It should look something like: See the community docs for more information.


16

The 12.04.2 and later release ISOs have a Hardware Enablement Stack to allow 12.04 to run on newer hardware. https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Kernel/LTSEnablementStack In an effort to support a wider variety of hardware on an existing LTS release, the 12.04.2 and newer point releases will ship with an updated kernel and X stack by default. These newer hardware ...


15

Yes Once you upgrade to 12.10, you will no longer be running 12.04, and no longer running an LTS release. The purpose of the LTS releases if for those who don't necessarily need the absolute most up-to-date packages, and would rather not upgrade every 6 months, but still get critical security updates and bug fixes for longer than the 18 months of support ...


14

I am not sure if what I was experiencing is the same but maybe this will work for you. I have Ubuntu 12.04 Server LTS updated 6-7-2012 and Desktop installed. I am also running this as a VM in vmware player, not sure if that matters or not. I had done a ctrl+alt+F1 from desktop to get a shell. When I tried to to start the gui again (sudo startx), I got ...


13

Because we use Firefox 11 instead of ESR and most of the same reasons apply to Thunderbird as Firefox for using the rapid release version. The decision to not use ESR by default in the LTS was surprising to me, so I asked on the mailinglists (you can find the thread here: https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-desktop/2012-February/003672.html) and Jason ...


12

I stumbled upon this thread whilst googling "ubuntu server stability issues" - searching for answers to my own concerns regarding the stability of Ubuntu server. I have to admit that I'm a long term Ubuntu fan, particularly on the desktop (Since Breezy). Box 1: "Fred" I first deployed Ubuntu server 8.04 on a production machine that has low usage ...


10

You can check here for all the releases and their end of life/schedule and stuff like that - https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Releases According to it, the end of life for Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx is April 2013 for the Desktop version April 2015 for the Server version Be clear, that end of life does not mean that Lucid Lynx will be unusable but just that it ...


10

Actually, the repositories will not disappear in 2012, since the server support remains for 5 years - April 2015. Support for the desktop disappears in April 2013 - LTS releases are 3 yrs for the desktop and 5 years for the server. From 12.04 - both the desktop and server support arrangements will be 5 years. Once the desktop support ends, it doesnt mean ...


10

The version in 10.04 is too old to have the vulnerability, no action is needed over the heart bleed bug.


9

There is no need to skip an LTS release. Those who want long term support without having to upgrade often may want to skip non-LTS releases, but there is no reason to skip an LTS release! You can simply use it and ignore the fact that it's LTS. Yes, you will be able to upgrade from 12.04 to 12.10, but NOT directly from 11.10 to 12.10.


9

Ubuntu Manpage for rsyslogd says this ... First of all there has been a systematic attempt to insure that rsyslogd follows its default, standard BSD behavior... rsyslogd should be able to use a standard syslog.conf and act like the orginal syslogd. However, an original syslogd will not work correctly with a ...


8

Actually no - its not ready... The command you have used tests to see if the next development release should be presented as an option to upgrade to. man upgrade-manager -d, --devel-release Check if upgrading to the latest devel release is possible See the linked question for more information. If you are currently on Natty ...


8

That part of that answer is wrong. LTS is based (mostly) on debian-testing From https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LTS: We are more conservative in our package merge with Debian, auto-synching with Debian testing, instead of Debian unstable. [LTS is not] Cutting Edge: Instead of doing an automatic full package import from Debian unstable, we will do it ...


7

First you should make sure Compiz is running. In a terminal type: ps -A | grep compiz If there is no output, you have a bigger problem and you need to properly configure your graphics card. Try running jockey in dash and installing proprietary drivers if you need them. If you are using a laptop with Nvidia Optimus card, look into the bumblebee project: ...


7

I would recommend Recovery using TestDisk. Boot Ubuntu from Live USB drive or CD, , run sudo apt-get install testdisk TestDisk is used to recover missing partitions and repair a corrupted one. It served me well in recent past to recover entire Hard disk , so i am suggesting it. After installing ,open Terminal and run sudo testdisk to get this ...


7

This is explained in the release notes for Precise: By default, the 12.04.2 point release will ship with a newer 3.5.0-23.35 Ubuntu kernel from Quantal, and a matching X.org stack. This is based on the 3.5.7.2 Extended Upstream Stable Kernel Release...The purpose of providing a newer kernel in the 12.04.2 point release is for hardware enablement. ...


7

I stopped burning a CD (or DVD) for ISO files about 2 years ago. A cheap 2GB Flash USB drive is 3-4 times faster for installs, and can be repeatedly reused (for later releases).


7

It means that you will only be able to get security updates during that period. One it is over, the repositories are closed and moved to an archive. Apt-get will stop working unless you change your software-sources, and even then no one will fix bugs or security problems. You can still use an unsupported version, but expect some problems. You can still ...


7

All supported versions of Ubuntu now receive updated versions of Firefox as soon as they are released by Mozilla, there's no need for a PPA or anything like that: How do I install the latest stable version of Firefox?


7

No. You should never just edit sources.list. Use the update-manager, or if you use command line, use do-release-upgrade. You can upgrade safely from LTS editions to other LTS editions, or otherwise, you need to step via each release. Only those pathways are supported, and prevent some issues that can otherwise occur with improper upgrades.


6

You said so yourself: I don't need to be on the cutting edge - I prefer to have a system that just works, long-term. In my humble opinion, Ubuntu 10.10 is an amazing release with a lot of cool stuff planned for 11.04 next, however, it also makes a lot more sense to go from LTS to LTS. What works for you in 10.04 will always work for you until the end ...


6

LTS is just a flag that stops the distro from having N+1 updates made available to it, only N+LTS. So yes if you choose to break the update cycle, you've lost the LTS release. You've got to make up your mind and decided do you want the latest whiz bang features or stability? Once you get into PPAs, staying on an LTS is quite nice.


6

You can install from a normal CD: http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/install-ubuntu-desktop


6

If you install a LTS release of Ubuntu that will not mean you will be stuck with it until the next LTS release. You will still be able to upgrade to the next version on the release cycle when ever you desire. An LTS release if just another release except you are given more support interval. From the Ubuntu wiki A normal Ubuntu release is supported for ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible