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0

That message means that dbus rejected an error message (org.freedesktop.DBus.Error.UnknownMethod) pulseaudio tried to send to bluetoothd, probably because bluetoothd called an unknown method on pulseaudio's interface. The strange thing is that error replies should be allowed (you should have "" in /etc/dbus-1/system.conf. I'm not sure if requested_reply="0" ...


0

Unlearn the need for logrotate. You don't need logrotate in the first place. This is a problem that has been solved since the middle 1990s. Get yourself one or more of: Dan Bernstein's multilog from daemontools, or Bruce Guenter's multilog from daemontools-encore, or Adam Sampson's multilog from freedt, or Laurent Bercot's s6-log from s6, or Gerrit ...


0

By default on Ubuntu 15.04, systemd journals are only volatile and kept in /run/systemd/journal and are lost at each reboot. To use persistent systemd journal, you need to create the /var/log/journal directory (and restart systemd-journald.service). So, may be, stdout output is just redirected to syslog and not kept in systemd journal. For that, you may ...


0

In fact, buffering in UNIX depends on the context: when stdout is redirected to something interactive like a console - it is usually line-buffered, otherwise it is fully buffered. Buffering may be changed inside the application using setvbuf library call. But it can also be done with stdbuf command on launch: ExecStart=/usr/bin/stdbuf -oL ...


0

You can try this: Press Ctrl+Alt+F1, then login into the system. If your password is correct, you will succeed. Then run rm .Xauthority .ICEauthority Press Ctrl+Alt+F7 and try to login again.


2

btmp logs failed attempts into your system. In theory this could mean someone is trying to brute force passwords. You can empty this file but should not remove it since software could crash when it expects the file to be there. To empty it from command line: sudo > /var/log/btmp If it gets filled quickly you really should investigate why. ...


0

For outgoing connections, e.g.: sudo iptables -I OUTPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 22 -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED -j LOG --log-prefix "Outgoing SSH connection " Check the log entries: less /var/log/kern.log If you reboot, your iptables configuration disappears. Save your configuration with: sudo iptables-save > /etc/iptables.rules sudo nano ...


1

/var/log/lastlog is a sparse file meaning its real size is not reported by ls -l but by ls -s. This means that your lastlog might not be as huge as you think: Try: ls -s /var/log/lastlog to get a report of its size in blocks. The sudden growth of /var/log/lastlog means a high UID user as logged out. Look at lastlog man page Edit - To fix it: You can ...


-3

If it's not installed by default: apt-get install bootlogd Then make sure /etc/default/bootlogd has BOOTLOGD_ENABLE=Yes.


1

TL;DR : The problem was due to the file var/log/syslog being very large in size with kernel especially ufw dumping a lot of UFW_AUDIT logs regularly. To solve the problem we need to set the LOGLEVEL of ufw as low in the ufw configuration file /etc/ufw/ufw.conf: sudo sed -i '/^LOGLEVEL/s/=.*/=low/' /etc/ufw/ufw.conf From man ufw: Loglevels above medium ...


2

Try less /var/log/syslog Press shift-f to go to the end of file and monitor changes like tail -f /var/log/syslog You should see your log file. There must be some garbage on them or maybe size issues that are preventing the Syslog app to view them. So, rename it and try to open the Syslog app again. You should be able to see your new log file.


2

Ok, I found solution somewhere else: sudo apt-get install --reinstall rsyslog It seems rsyslog was removed at some point, but I don't even remember why would I have done something like that. I didn't even know what tool was responsible for logging.


0

Note that any use of sudo on the system will already be logged in /var/log/auth.log. That file also contains other authorization-related information (see more details here about log files). Sudo also logs more than just the timestamp, but also the user who invoked sudo, the working directory, and more. If you want to just extract the uses of apt-get install ...


1

Look at what has changed in the log file: sudo tail /var/log/auth.log - it is just a text file, after, all.



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