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3

For viewing logs in real-time, use tail -f -n [number of lines] [file]. -f is for follow, which will pipe the appended log data to stdout (e.g. console window) as the data is written to the file -n is for number of lines to follow A good place to start would be /var/log/syslog. This is the default log file for many system events, services, and ...


1

All activity is pretty broad. To add to the existing answers: dmesg dumps the kernel log to the terminal. Man page. strace allows real-time tracing of all system calls from single a given process. Man page. Ubuntu page. perf "strace on steroids." Perf is a very powerful tool for tracing events at various different granularities across the system, ...


7

Many things you simply cannot spot, because they are handled inside the application or process without any communication to "the outer world". a random (totally incomplete) list of a few of the most important tools you could use however to monitor specific sections of what is going on: the top command: from man top: The top program provides a dynamic ...


6

Try history command, it displays the last $HISTSIZE (default 500) executed command in terminal. journalctl command displays log messages, if system uses systemd. ps -aux shows running processes, can be used with ps -aux|grep xxxx to select a specific process.


0

I installed Ubuntu 16.04 today and I noticed the same problem. However, I fixed this with busybox-syslogd. Yup! I've Just installed that package and problem has been solved. :) sudo apt-get install busybox-syslogd I hope this simple solution is useful for other people around.


9

Use journalctl Since journald contains all the logs, you can use the journalctl command with suitable filters. In the case of boot.log, which used to contain messages from the init system, you could do: journalctl -b0 SYSLOG_PID=1 -b0 shows messages from the current boot, -b1 from the previous boot, and so on. Without the -b option, journalctl will show ...


5

In Ubuntu 16.04 the boot.log file is still located in the /var/log folder as you can see here. The boot logfile is from today (2016-04-29). Maybe something went wrong when you installed Ubuntu 16.04 or have upgraded the operating system from Ubuntu 15.10 to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Alternatively you can examine the general boot behavior from the comprehensive ...


0

Did you enter this? logkeys --start --output path/to/logkeys.log Also logkeys may need to be prompted with your correct device id; you can see the procedure to fix it in the docs, all the way down under 'Troubleshooting' https://github.com/kernc/logkeys#Usage_how-to


0

The uniq command can be used to eliminate all consecutive lines which are identical in whole or in part. By default, it only operates on whole lines. That is, if in a file you have several identical consecutive lines, uniq removes the duplicates. $ cat foo.txt foo foo foo bar baz baz foo foo $ uniq foo.txt foo bar baz foo In order to remove all ...


0

Using sort with a bit of help from tac: sort -k4,4 file.log | tac | sort -uk4,4 | sort -k1,2 To get last 10 entries, send to tail -10 at the end: sort -k4,4 file.log | tac | sort -uk4,4 | sort -k1,2 | tail -10 -k option of sort let us sort by space separated field number as key tac will reverse the lines of input content i.e. last goes first and first ...


1

Go to the phone app, than pull up the window at the bottom were it says Recent: lists All and Missed calls!


0

Just had the same problem. I have no clue where it comes from but a reboot solved it for me. I then made my system more robust by changing the logrotate defaults in /etc/logrotate.conf and /etc/logrotate.d/* from fixed times to size-dependent. This way I have a longer history on slow log files and a better prevention against disk overflow from logs ...


1

Logins are traceable via last and lastb command, actions requiring sudo privilege are traceable via /var/log/auth.log , but anything that is a normal , unprivileged action is untraceable , at least if it's done via GUI. Command line is traceable via user's history file, if and only if they've not fiddled with history file. You could spawn script command ...



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