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2

As @Rinzwind pointed out: the permissions on the /var/log directory may have accidentally been changed. In a fresh install they are drwxrwxr-x. Change your permissions: chmod 775 /var/log and restart rsyslog (or reboot). Test the syslog facility with: logger "this message should end up in syslog"


1

As the STDOUT stream is block buffered by default (when not going to terminal) by python, you need to make the stream unbuffered (or line buffered). python provides a way to make the streams unbuffered, here is the Pythonic way: python -u foo.py So, your whole command line becomes: python -u foo.py | ~/timestamp.sh >> ~/logs/foo.log From man ...


1

The root cause is your process, here python, is using libc stdout where the output is line buffered when output to a terminal but block buffered when output to something else, like a pipe here. You can fix the issue either in the python code by explicitly flushing the buffer after each log output: sys.stdout.flush() or by controlling how buffering will ...


1

The problem was that rsyslog was loading the 50-default.conf preferences before the custom preferences set in my_iptables.conf. The solution was to add a number prefix to the conf filename, one that was lower than 50. So I renamed it to 10-my_iptables.conf. File /etc/rsyslog.d/10-my_iptables.conf # Log kernel generated iptables log messages to file :msg,...


3

This warning appears if kernel function trace_module_has_bad_taint() returns true; namely any of the following taint flags have been set: TAINT_FORCED_MODULE (module loading has been forced) TAINT_CPU_OUT_OF_SPEC (CPU is behaving in a way that may cause tracing issues?) TAINT_FORCED_RMMOD (module has been forced removed) TAINT_MACHINE_CHECK (Machine Check ...


0

This is a very old question, but none of these answers seem satisfactory. First make your cron job run every minute, then run cron as non-daemon (temporarily, just kill any crond that may have already started) with test logging: crond -nx test And see the log of your program execution flowing through your terminal.


2

The log will be found in /etc//NetworkManager/system-connections. Here, for example, is a slightly redacted listing from my machine: sudo cat /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/MMMB\ Wi-Fi [connection] id=MMMB Wi-Fi uuid=3ab72ecb-9f3f-4642-82eb-15b0ff90819a type=wifi permissions=user:chili:; secondaries= [wifi] mac-address=XX:3D:82:7A:FE:XX mac-...


3

By default, rsyslog uses traditional timestamp, which in date command's format would be: %b %d %H:%M:%S This is enabled by the following line in /etc/rsyslog.conf: $ActionFileDefaultTemplate RSYSLOG_TraditionalFileFormat To enable high precision timestamping, comment out the line: # $ActionFileDefaultTemplate RSYSLOG_TraditionalFileFormat which ...


2

there is arbtt that does exactly what you describe: https://www.joachim-breitner.de/blog/336-The_Automatic_Rule-Based_Time_Tracker


6

Always fun to write a script for it! The script below will produce an output (report) like: ------------------------------------------------------------ nautilus 0:00:05 (3%) ------------------------------------------------------------ 0:00:05 (3%) .usagelogs ------------------------------------------------------------ firefox 0:01:10 (36%) --------...



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