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1

Well it lists fetchmail as a dependency in apt-cache so it should send the mail without any other mail server. How did you install it? If it was through apt-get it should already have fetchmail installed. Try installing it with sudo apt-get install fetchmail or reinstall logcheck with sudo apt-get install --reinstall logcheck


0

I found that removing the non-existent files from the file pattern solved the problem. With the non-existent files configured, although the existing files were considered on the right interval, the part of the rotation that moves the original never happened. Clearly a bug I suggest.


0

Run netstat as superuser to actually see the process that is using port 80 (like it is telling you basically). sudo netstat -antp | grep 80


1

I was going through some bug reports and noticed in this one: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/ubuntu-gnome-default-settings/+bug/1536771 that Plymouth is actually writing to boot.log. If you look at https://launchpadlibrarian.net/257898272/plymouth-debug.log and search in your browser for 'boot.log' you get the following lines: [main.c:821] ...


1

You have to change the keymap that logkeys uses. You have to understand that logkeys is made in such a way that it can work on different keyboards all over the world. These keyboards come in different languages, accents etc. logkeys comes with a default keymap. I, for one, found that this keymap did not print output correctly for me too, and hence, I ...


2

Even didn't need a full script... ...but put it in the form of a script: #!/bin/bash file=$1 dbus-monitor "interface='org.freedesktop.Notifications'" |\ grep --line-buffered "string" |\ grep --line-buffered -e method -e ":" -e '""' -e urgency -e notify -v |\ grep --line-buffered '.*(?=string)|(?<=string).*' -oPi |\ grep --line-buffered -v '^\s*$' ...


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I believe the logfile name is printed out on the last line of output when running the command. ~/.cloud-install/commands.log Also see these tips.


2

Well, it's rather the other way around. That program just reads the informations from the text files in your /var/log directory... Just look directly at those files and there you are! :)


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For viewing logs in real-time, use tail -f -n [number of lines] [file]. -f is for follow, which will pipe the appended log data to stdout (e.g. console window) as the data is written to the file -n is for number of lines to follow A good place to start would be /var/log/syslog. This is the default log file for many system events, services, and ...


2

All activity is pretty broad. To add to the existing answers: dmesg dumps the kernel log to the terminal. Man page. strace allows real-time tracing of all system calls from single a given process. Man page. Ubuntu page. perf "strace on steroids." Perf is a very powerful tool for tracing events at various different granularities across the system, ...


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Many things you simply cannot spot, because they are handled inside the application or process without any communication to "the outer world". a random (totally incomplete) list of a few of the most important tools you could use however to monitor specific sections of what is going on: the top command: from man top: The top program provides a dynamic ...


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Try history command, it displays the last $HISTSIZE (default 500) executed command in terminal. journalctl command displays log messages, if system uses systemd. ps -aux shows running processes, can be used with ps -aux|grep xxxx to select a specific process.


0

I installed Ubuntu 16.04 today and I noticed the same problem. However, I fixed this with busybox-syslogd. Yup! I've Just installed that package and problem has been solved. :) $ sudo apt-get install busybox-syslogd After installing that package, reset syslog and kern.log: sudo tee /var/log/syslog /var/log/kern.log </dev/null I hope this simple ...



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