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22

You can find lots of marketing materials on Spread Ubuntu, they have some great looking SVG posters which can be downloaded and edited using Inkscape. You may also be interested in joining the Ubuntu Marketing Team or the Ubuntu Art Team which are both involved in created posters and logos. You can also find some nice materials on openclipart, while not ...


14

There are tons of ways that an organized group of people can contribute to Ubuntu. Here are some of mine: LoCo Activities - formal teams in Ubuntu are called Local Teams (LoCo), they have a ton of information with good ideas on their wiki page. You can find if there's an existing LoCo team in the directory. I recommend you contact them and let them know ...


14

What is an Ubuntu localized image? Due to space restrictions, the official Ubuntu installation CDs (also known as ISO images) that can be downloaded from ubuntu.com contain only a handful of the many languages in which Ubuntu is available. Any additional languages can then be downloaded during or after the installation. Localized images are customized ...


13

The Ubuntu Community supports Local Community Teams. You can find a list of these teams here: http://loco.ubuntu.com/teams/ This site also shows all the events that the local teams organize.


10

As an Ubuntu member, I don't see anything wrong with this in the least. Especially if the sponsor "uses and loves Ubuntu." There's precedent for this as well. Just off the top of my head, I know that the UK LoCo Team's podcast has sponsorship. System 76 and ZaReason have both been know to sponsor LoCo events as well. I don't believe there are any guidelines, ...


9

Why don't you try and get in contact with the South Africa LoCo team http://ubuntu-za.org/ or subscribe to their mailing list https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-za They have a couple of release parties set up, I'd expect you could get a CD there http://ubuntu-za.org/news/2012/04/19/precise-pangolin-release-parties You can look up ...


8

If it's non-commercial, no problem. The trademark policy should allow this. If there's any doubt, you can email your plans to Canonical and you'll get a straight answer in writing. Here's the relevant extract: Community advocacy. Ubuntu is built by, and largely for, its community. We share access to the Trademarks with the entire community for the ...


8

It might be useful to contact your Local Community Team and ask if they have any professionally printed posters or flyers available. (We do!) The LoCoTeam might also have info about localised poster & flyer designs, and other promotional material. Or they might want to cooperate with you in having something printed (printing in larger volumes is a lot ...


6

I don't see anything wrong with this at all! It already happens in other LoCos. You're approaching it with the right mentality though. The benefit (of funding, etc) to the event attendees should heavily outweigh the marketing presence. A visible logo and a mention at the beginning and end seems like a typical convention, erm, convention. If they want to sit ...


5

Information (and guidelines) about how to create a new LoCo team are at Ubuntu Wiki: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LoCoTeamHowto


4

For starters you cannot add an event for a team unless you are a member of that team. The procedure for registering an event is as follows: Go to http://loco.ubuntu.com/events/ Click on Add Team Event - Login through the LP SSO if you are not already logged in Submit the details for the new event You will then have a publishable link to the event ...


4

In addition to the above, you can also organize a Software Freedom Day event. Some of the flyers / posters / etc. are generic enough to be used year-round. You can find some of those at: http://wiki.softwarefreedomday.org/StartGuide#Useful_Documents.2C_Templates.2C_Files_and_Examples


3

I've always helped identified people's needs and showed them how Ubuntu's implemented those needs. My audience is usually Mac and Windows people - but it's the same idea. Spend a few minutes touching on the new features in 10.04 then let the questions begin. I've also found that spending a little time highlighting what you like and use it for is also helpful ...


3

The way we run our Ubuntu Hour is basically one of a very relaxed social interaction. No one needs to talk about Ubuntu if they don't want to and we generally let the flow of the hour or two take us to random places. Basically we just enjoy each others company. It's important to not put too much of a burden or expectation, those kinds of more targeted ...


3

you can contact the Ubuntu Loco Community Council from their Launchpad page or Community council. https://launchpad.net/~communitycouncil


2

Absolutely! We encourage and recommend people to advocate Ubuntu either as part of a LoCo Team or outside of LoCo Teams if they wish. The primary aim of the ADK is to simply provide all the documentation and materials you need to perform great advocacy. Good luck!


2

I've always thought that the Ubuntu Hour isn't supposed to preach Ubuntu to the Linux converted (although if that happens, it's not necessarily a bad thing), it's more supposed to be try and encourage people who don't have any experience of Linux, let alone Ubuntu to give it a try. Consider making a small sign (just an A4 sheet folded into three - making a ...


2

In my humble opinion an Ubuntu hour can serve two different purposes. It is possible for the event to serve one or the other, or both. Advocacy For successful advocacy having informational handouts, CDs and a computer that people can sample improve the quality of the event. Handouts can contain Ubuntu only information or contain both information about ...


2

Per discussions I have had with a LoCo Council Member there is no problem accepting sponsorship's or donations from companies so long as such a sponsorship or donation does not come with strings attached that require the LoCo to do sales pitches or endorse a certain product or company. Further I have talked with a few other LoCo Team Leads and it seems ...


1

The key is to start small and to not be deterred by a ton of "process" or governance (as some of the documentation would indicate.) An Ubuntu enthusiast can host an event in their area by simply inviting people that love Ubuntu to gather in an accessible, convenient, and free (or nearly free) venue. Coffee shops are great for this. Make some small posters ...


1

Step 0: Define your target audience. If you've talked to your LUG, you've probably not tapped anyone that hasn't heard of Ubuntu. Try to reach outward, far beyond the traditional LUG crowd. Try to define and reach an audience that has no idea what Ubuntu is. That's where the real progress is made. Step 1: Advertise your event at least 1 week in advance. ...


1

Starting a twitter account. Posting updates and relevant news. Reaching out to prominent bloggers in the Ubuntu and Linux world. Posting on forums, just getting the word out. I see on your website you have badges. Get as many people as possible to post the badge maybe some sort of contest. But then again people only do what they want to. Also directing ...


1

I think a big thing is that concrete > vague. Tools like harvest and such that help users find specific items to work on will help increase participation and work. I'd love to see each area (packaging, bugs, docs) have someone up the team work on a "todo" list of things they'd like to see get done for the Jam. This way the participants and would-be ...


1

Apart from LoCo Teams, you could also try your local LUG (Linux User Group) or general computer club (they might have a linux or Ubuntu workgroup).


1

If you're in a town/city that doesn't have a team, then you have the power to create one. And, even if you're not a member of a current team, you can always reach out to someone who is by connecting to them at http://loco.ubuntu.com


1

If you can provide transportation for the shipment FOB Portland, Oregon, you could apply for a grant from a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization, FreeGeek.Org. See http://www.freegeek.org/about/grants for details.



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