Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Yes, that's all that was necessary to fix the language problem: editing /etc/default/locale and correcting the first line.


0

There are some recommendations when configuring locales in remote machines 1) In Debian machines (remote machine), run the command (as root): dpkg-reconfigure locales On the first screen, select the desired locales. After that you will be prompted to choose which is the default locale. Select "none" (reference: https://wiki.debian.org/Locale#Standard ). ...


2

I've solved this problem following the steps below. I've been studying how locales work and the different configuration sets between some distributions (Debian Based originally). I use Linux Mint as my primary system distribution and Debian as my system servers. Despite the fact Ubuntu is derived from Debian, the locale settings are slightly different. 1) ...


2

The /etc/default/locale file is loaded by PAM; see /etc/pam.d/login for example. However, PAM is not invoked when running a command in a Docker container. To configure the locale, simply set the relevant environment variable in your Dockerfile. Example: FROM ubuntu:trusty ENV LANG en_US.UTF-8 CMD ["/bin/bash"]


-1

Guys guys why are you going crazy?? All you need is to go to Search bar or Unity Lens (if Ubuntu) type "Language" you will find "Country/Region & Language" Application. In the "Country" Tab Choose your desired locale language. If you want to keep current locale and change some other options like date format, or imperial to metric measurements, just use ...


0

No. It will probably be supported if/when it's included in glibc. The en_DK.UTF-8 locale currently serves a similar purpose, so I would guess that you can achieve basically the same settings this way: Select English (Denmark) in the Regional Formats tab in Language Support. Add this line to your ~/.profile file: export LC_MONETARY=en_IE.UTF-8



Top 50 recent answers are included