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3

A small addition although it probably doesn't apply in the case of apt as I regard it as a quite stable piece of software: Some programs notoriosly misbehave when using a different setting for LANG (or atleast different from C or en_US). Unity had (still has?) these issues (and Unity-based games), Unreal Engine had some problems too. Also some of the ...


24

If you're troubleshooting, you'll likely post your results in some forum, or here, sooner or later. When that happens, it's much more simpler for other users to understand your logs and output, if they're not internationalised. That's to say, if you're using French or Chinese or Hindi or whatever as your system language, the output is likely to use terms ...


9

LANG=C will make your terminal output fall-back to the default locale. As this guide suggests you sending your output to Launchpad for support, they are having you do this so that, when you paste it in, others will be able to read it no matter what language you usually use.


3

Append the value to your ~/.bashrc file: echo 'export LC_NUMERIC="en_US.UTF-8"' >>~/.bashrc To make it applicable from the current session of bash, source the ~/.bashrc file: source ~/.bashrc Example: Here i am changing from en_US.UTF-8 to C: $ locale | grep LC_NUMERIC LC_NUMERIC="en_US.UTF-8" $ echo 'export LC_NUMERIC="C"' >>~/.bashrc $ ...


0

Modify /etc/locale.gen, uncommenting or adding the locales you wish generated. Then run sudo locale-gen. You can check that the locales are added with locale -a, which will show all locales.


1

Launch Thunderbird and navigate to the menu Tools → Add Ons, go to the Languages tab and make sure that you have enabled the German language package.


1

One possibility may be to keep the English folder names for all users, and prevent the prompt about renaming them from showing up. I think that can be done by removing the file ~/.config/user-dirs.locale. The login manager lightdm-gtk-greeter allows you to select the display language at login. However, if we are talking about a Kubuntu system, I'm not sure ...


0

This turned out to be a Slack bug. I addressed it by removing myspell-en_AU but the real fix is for Slack to fix their code. They're working on that.


0

I just added LC_TIME=en_DK.UTF-8 to /etc/default/locale. Works fine on Linux Mint 17.3. 1) open /etc/default/locale in editor. The content of the file should be something like this: LANG="en_US.UTF-8" LC_NUMERIC="en_US.UTF-8" LC_MONETARY="en_US.UTF-8" LC_PAPER="en_US.UTF-8" LC_NAME="en_US.UTF-8" LC_ADDRESS="en_US.UTF-8" LC_TELEPHONE="en_US.UTF-8" ...


1

It looks like the date command without arguments outputs the locale's "date_fmt", which is not in ISO 8601 format in the en_DK locale. You can get the desired output by adding a FORMAT argument - something like: LC_TIME=en_DK.UTF-8 date +'%x %X' Please see man date for further FORMAT sequences.



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