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6

Depending on the way you've set up your system it might be as easy as copying the monitors.xml file from the correctly set-up user to all users: Test for one user: cp --preserver=timestamps /home/CorrectUser/.config/monitors.xml /home/TestUser/.config/ then log off TestUser, log back on and see whether everything is correct. Now do for all users: cp ...


2

Okay turns out the [drm:intel_dp_start_link_train] *ERROR* too many voltage retries, give up from the kernel is a known bug but was a red herring and had nothing to do with my problems and from what I've seen people say it's not a problem. I think it has something to do with ASUS. I am using ASUS TaiChi 21. Also running systemctl enable for several login ...


2

To set your screen configuration for every user on log in (this will not change the configuration on the log in screen), you can create a .desktop file in /etc/xdg/autostart How to do that find out the name of the screen you'd like to be rotated by running xrandr. It will output a number of lines, among thos a few lines looking like: VGA-0 connected ...


2

This is done by booting into text mode: make a backup by running the command below: sudo cp -n /etc/default/grub /etc/default/grub.orig If for some reason you want to revert to original settings, just run command below in terminal: sudo mv /etc/default/grub.orig /etc/default/grub && sudo update-grub To get started, press Ctrl+Alt+T to open ...


1

The answer is XDM. $ sudo apt-get install xdm The following NEW packages will be installed xdm 0 to upgrade, 1 to newly install, 0 to remove and 47 not to upgrade. Need to get 0 B/169 kB of archives. After this operation, 848 kB of additional disk space will be used. Edit: Please note that the exact packages required to install XDM may vary depending on ...


1

The Arch Wiki lists several Display Managers, of which three lightweight Display Managers are XDM (153 total dependencies1), LXDM (172 total dependencies1) and SLiM (121 total dependencies1). Personally I'd liked the themes available for LXDM, and the SLiM Arch Wiki page says the project is abandoned (it worked well, though). It also lists a couple of ...


1

You may wish to append something to /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf. Here we create a script that uses an xrandr command to setup your display(s). You can use some graphical RandR tool to create a command for you, such as arandr. In my case, the script would look like: #!/bin/sh xrandr --output DVI-I-1 --mode 1600x1200 --pos 0x0 --rotate left --output DVI-I-0 ...


1

I experienced the same problem and the cause in my case was that I tried to add something to the /etc/environment file and whatever I added seemed to not want me to log in after I restarted. Solution: When at the login screen press ALT-->F2, login with admin username and password and edit the /etc/environment file and remove what changes you made to it. ...


1

Using Ubuntu, the best way to get your user account to have the right resolution for your dual monitor setup is as follows: Delete monitors.xml from ~/.config/ Open Screen Display in System Settings Set appropriate screen settings (use XRandR or ARandR beforehand if need be) Then the big one - Hit Apply You'll notice after doing the above that ...


1

I just installed after reading your post. I ran an apt-cache search :~$ apt-cache search fvwm and selected and installed fvwm-crystal :~$ sudo apt-get install fvwm-crystal -y Before installing fvwm-crystal I was using an openbox derivative and removed all of my /usr/share/xsessions/.desktop files, except openbox.desktop that way I would only be ...


1

Since you are able to login through console check output of ls -l ~/.Xauthority It must be owned by you. If it is owned by root - that's the problem. chown username:username .Xauthority should fix it


1

This is just a workaround that save me in two cases I've faced: One was a bad update of gnome-session from a PPA. Another one, I couldn't figure out but all trials left me in front of lightdm. In both cases, I got login loop with lightdm then: I switched to another display manager gdm: sudo apt-get install gdm Reboot, login was successful.


1

I had almost the same problem. When the logon screen will be shown press Ctrl+Alt+F1. This will take you to TTY1. Login with your default credentials. Type in TTY1: sudo -s Then type: adduser username(Type whatever you want instead of username) Choose password and confirm it. Then go to GUI by pressing Ctrl+Alt+F7 Login with your new user. Go to System ...


1

I had a similar error and the problem was due to my /tmp/ directory having the incorrect permissions and .Xauthority. This Answer worked for me (I copied and pasted it in case it gets removed, @SiddharthaRT is the original author): Press Ctrl+Alt+F3 and login into the shell. Now run ls -lah. If in the output the line -rw------- 1 root root 53 Nov 29 ...


1

First, we need to configure the Yubikey for challenge response. A good manual for Linux is given by Yubico under https://developers.yubico.com/yubico-pam/Authentication_Using_Challenge-Response.html Now you should be able to use your yubikey for authentification at login. One convenient piece is missing: The automatic lock of the screen when die Yubikey is ...


1

Adding the command numlockx on to Startup Applications Some commands break if you add them to startup applications, because the command needs a fully loaded desktop to run successfully, and Startup Applications runs the commands too early. If the command numlockx on works once you are logged in, I am pretty sure it is a matter of timing to make it work ...


1

I solved my issue by using gnome-tweak-tool to access the now unavailable keyboard settings of former Gnome / Ubuntu versions. As I stated my in question my keyboard does not have a physical num lock key. The keys do not have any print for the other functions either: A thread in BackTrack Linux forum suggested to check “Numeric keypad keys work as with ...



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