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There's a new software i use called ELFex Linker, it creates static exeutables from dynamic executables, and doesnt require access to the source code


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Have you tried updating your system by doing sudo apt-get update? If you haven't, I'd highly recommend doing that before proceeding to install the .deb file. From the looks of it, you are missing some files. Hopefully doing sudo apt-get update works for you. If not, I'd highly recommend proceeding to do the following below. This option is a fail proof ...


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libicudata.so.55 comes from the libicu55 package which is only available in the development version of Ubuntu, wily werewolf. You can get the .deb manually from here but it is not going to work because of the dependency problem. You will have to install those dependencies as well. To remain on a stable release of Ubuntu (or any other debian system) while ...


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To list all installed files for a package and the dependencies, use debfoster sudo apt-get install debfoster and a script like this. In this example I have used the package libboost-all-dev debfoster -d libboost-all-dev |\ awk '! /depends on/ {\ for(i=1;i<=NF;i++) {\ printf "\n>>> %s \n",$i; system("dpkg -L "$i)\ ...


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Easy: sudo apt-get install libqt4-opengl-dev


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A static library file ending with the .a extension is simply an archive of the compiled object files from the source code. You can unpack the object files into a directory, from the foo.a file, using the ar tool in a terminal. However, this still does not allow you to edit the source and make changes. If you want to modify the program in question, then you ...


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Libraries are binary files, so you won't be able to see the contents using a text editor or any regular text file reading program like cat, less etc. Your best bet would be to use strings to read the readable contents from the library.


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@karel answer is the correct one. But in the spirit of "teach them to fish": if you need to find which package provides a certain file, install apt-file sudo apt-get install apt-file sudo apt-file update (repeat the update from time to time) and then, in your case: [romano:~] % apt-file search vlc/vlc.h libvlc-dev: /usr/include/vlc/vlc.h


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In all supported versions of Ubuntu vlc.h is provided by libvlc-dev. This package contains headers and a static library required to build standalone applications that use VLC features. To install libvlc-dev open the terminal and type: sudo apt-get install libvlc-dev When libvlc-dev is installed, the path to vlc/vlc.h is /usr/include/vlc/vlc.h



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