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As your current monitors.xml contains an a bunch of monitors you tried in the past or that got created by the system during updates, please save the following file to monitors.new. The second file just contains your original configuration when installing the system and all other configurations have just been deleted. Now reboot, Log into the console by ...


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In the terminal: sudo gedit /etc/default/grub Change GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash acpi_osi=" Save, then sudo update-grub Restart computer. The function keys (fn+F5/F6) should now be active.


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I had the same problem and it was solved with installation of new drivers for touchpad. Download this archive (from Ubuntu's bug reporting page). Open a terminal, and follow these steps (after step 4, you will have no mouse at all): cd ~/Downloads sudo dkms ldtarball psmouse-elantech-x551c.tar.gz sudo dkms install -m psmouse -v elantech-x551c sudo rmmod ...


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I found a solution for my VN7-571G-56N0 Touchpad: ↳ SYN1B7F:00 06CB:2970 UNKNOWN My solution isn't nice but its a workaround. Obviously the Touchpad isn't detected by the driver. I don't have another explanation for such a bad configured driver. Step 1: Download enable-rightbutton.sh Step 2: Identify your touchpad ID using xinput Step 3: Activate the ...


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It should work nicely, it have done so on my Latitude E6510. But just in case download the driver package from dell: http://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/19/Drivers/DriversDetails?driverId=0WKFN Here on Ubuntu you can get a 12.04 image: http://www.ubuntu.com/certification/hardware/201304-13407/ Those downloads is just in case Murphy raises his ugly ...


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When you began running the Linux installation, did you choose to install Linux: over Windows, that is to say on the same partition that windows was on, or along side Windows, on a separate [new] partition? Assuming it was the former option, you will have lost your Windows XP partition if, as you say, the Linux install got halfway. This is because the ...


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See if you have logind-handle-lid-switch set to true: $ xfconf-query -vl -c xfce4-power-manager /xfce4-power-manager/lock-screen-suspend-hibernate true /xfce4-power-manager/logind-handle-lid-switch true You can get get to a GUI to set logind-handle-lid-switch by: $ xfce4-settings-editor I had the same issue until I did that. On a sidenote: I ...


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Type the following commands into the Terminal: sudo su -c "echo options psmouse proto=exps > /etc/modprobe.d/psmouse.modprobe" sudo reboot


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On top of the link you've already got, you can have a look at the Ubuntu Supported Hardware catalogue. If the laptop's technical specifications only contains hardware that's mentioned on this list, it's obviously compatible with Ubuntu regardless of Ubuntu version.


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Long answer short: put the laptop into shutdown/hibernate mode whilst in a backpack. No need to worry about overheating.


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Some of the LEDs are hardware-only and there's no way to change their status programmatically. The ones which can be controlled can be accessed via the sysfs virtual filesystem at /sys/class/leds/. Whether a particular LED can be controlled programmatically or not depends on the particular hardware. For example, my desktop machine has a few LEDs but none ...


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You can't do that out of the box. What do you consider a danger zone? The CPU can easily handle temperatures in excess of 80 degrees C. Batteries don't go bad when exposed to temperatures in a backpack environment for short periods. When exposed to really high temperatures they can lose capacity so they will last shorter. Furthermore it's usually bad to ...


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To reduce the brightness of you screen by manually is xbacklight is requied open your terminal and type this sudo apt-get install xbacklight and then type xbacklight -set 50 there 50 stands for brightness range we can get it upto 100 from 0. you can also increase and decrease the brightness from present value to specified level.as you mentioned ...


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One thing I think you are missing is that you haven't got the latest driver. I don't believe it is yet included in the kernel you installed. I'll post my complete solution below in case others are looking for this. I had been struggling with this issue for months. Here's what finally worked for me and seems to be working for others on 14.04: Download the ...


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Thanks a lot everyone the unetbootin site really helped. I had no idea how to burn the image files. I did finally have to burn them to my hard drive but it worked and installed perfectly. Now I just have to figure out how to get the Internet to work.


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Download the .iso from here Burn the .iso to a usb flash drive using unetbootin Go to your bios settings(probably F2) and change it so it will boot from the usb Then choose the option Install Ubuntu


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This may not be the most modest approach, but it works for my Ubuntu 12.04 Acer. You will need to run this command as super user (su). $ sudo su # echo 200 > /sys/class/backlight/intel_backlight/brightness This will change your brightness (on a scale of 0-1000). Be careful you don't put in 0 or your screen will turn off! If this process works for ...


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I resolved this issue in Ubuntu 14.10 by replacing 'ehci_hcd' to ehci-pci' in 11_usb_s3. I have ehci-pci folder instead of ehci_hcd. #!/bin/sh #unbind usb device before enter S3 #bind usb device after resume from S3 case "${1}" in suspend | hibernate) for i in `lspci -vv | grep "USB controller" | awk '/EHCI/ {print $1}'` ...


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Edit the /etc/default/grub file and add pcie_aspm=force acpi_backlight=vendor after GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" Then the whole line will look like this: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash pcie_aspm=force acpi_backlight=vendor" For more detail visit this link.


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Most likely one of these situations is the case (In the example, HP 22" is my main screen) The screen is misaligned or in another position than you assume Open System settings > Screens: 1. the screen is misaligned 2. the screen is positioned differently from what you assume: on the left side.. ... or on top: Simply drag the window in another ...


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Looks in System Settings - > Displays how configuration of your system looks like. If all is okay and it looks like you predicted then try to move your mouse fast, sometimes my screen may not work for some reasons even if I know that I'm on the level of the screen I need. If all of it isn't work problem may be with the cabal change your hdmi/dvi or other.


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I achieve the similar goal by using acpi. use /usr/bin/acpi_listen to catch the acpi event you want, on my lapttop, the event that fire when switch to battery is "ac_adapter ACPI0003:00 00000080 00000000". so I create a new event : /etc/acpi/events/switch-to-battery, below is the content: event=ac_adapter ACPI0003:00 00000080 00000000 ...


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Make a local udev rule gksudo gedit /etc/udev/rules.d/60-bluetooth-hid2hci.rules And enter the following http://paste.ubuntu.com/10129429/plain/ copy from paste then save, exit gedit, reboot It should work from the bug report https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/bluez/+bug/1315290 A found an incorrect attribute in the first paste compared to your ...


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Try repeatedly pressing F2 while starting the system up instead of just holding it. I'm pretty sure your on the right track with F2, but if you don't see that on screen please check your laptop manual.


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For Samsung NP300E4C .. from: Samsung NP300E5C User Manual > Page 75 Turn the computer on. Immediately press the F2 key several times. You may just have to keep trying. You don't need to change boot-order, as generally better results can be obtained by manually selecting boot device. More modern laptops, with Windows 8.1, do actively prevent you ...



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