New answers tagged

0

If you want numlock to be enabled before getting to the login screen sudo apt-get install numlockx Then edit the file /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf And add this line to the bottom: greeter-setup-script=/usr/bin/numlockx on This will enable the numlock before you login as opposed to something like indicator-keylock which only loads with the desktop. It's ...


0

Open a Terminal window and type: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:tsbarnes/indicator-keylock sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install indicator-keylock indicator-keylock' Then press numlock key to activate it. The indicator will make sure it will remain active even after reboot.


0

I am the creator of the project. Please install the latest version of msi-keyboard, or install the keyboard LED manager app from here: https://github.com/stevelacy/msi-keyboard-gui The issue you are having is due to a buffer error in node-hid fixed in our recent release.


0

I had this problem and found the answer on the Ubuntu bug report helpful. After switching input method from iBus to xim, and then restarting, global hotkeys worked. To do this, run imconfig then follow the directions, and then restart X11 with sudo restart lightdm (assuming you use the default lightdm). You should be able to switch back to iBus afterwards, ...


0

This was a pain in the button to get working. I really wanted to make a precise answer but I think the tech is a little flaky and the tools are a little trying. I did it once successfully, went to do it again from my notes to make sure my answer was sound and it took me another hour of trying to get it to take. These are the steps I followed on Ubuntu 16.04 ...


0

It turns out the F7 to enter command mode works pretty well, after all. The char function is not limited to just hex codes, decimal values work just as well. Hitting F7 to enter command mode then entering char 31 produces exactly what I needed.


0

It turns out the shortcut Ctrl-S freezes keyboard input. This can be undone with Ctrl-Q.


1

This is the bash script I use: https://gist.github.com/vzaliva/0adba7bc40e2f31a0b5f802af2a63267 Works on IBM ThinkPad X260 with Ubuntu 16.04.


0

Due to some very strange issues, Secure Boot is breaking the keyboard under the server installer. A temporary workaround is just to disable Secure Boot for the VM.


0

I was able to make it work through the command line based on this Ask Ubuntu answer and this Ubuntu Forums thread. First unplug the bluetooth dongle and delete configuration files: sudo \rm -rf /var/lib/bluetooth/* Then replug the bluetooth dongle and run bluetoothctl. In the bluetoothctl prompt, type the following commands: power on agent on ...


0

I Noticed that I was only using Switch to next source using: and Switch to previous source using: was empty. I tried reassigning the same shortcut key again and it works perfectly now thanks to @GunnarHjalmarsson suggestion in the comments above.


1

You can use xinput to achieve what you want. xinput is a utility to list available input devices, query information about a device and change input device settings. Open a terminal and execute xinput list - you will receive an output information which will read like this : severus@Tux:~$ xinput list ⎡ Virtual core pointer id=2 ...


0

You need to set this key to false: gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.peripherals.keyboard repeat false The same via dconf: dconf write /org/gnome/desktop/peripherals/keyboard/repeat false


0

I have been having the same problem for the longest time but I think I have it figured out: On the icon that says "En", which has the language and Character map, Select "Text Entry Settings" and see what options are set up for your computer to solve this issue. Mine had "Switch to Next source using" and "Switch to previous source using"; this for the input ...


0

Use xmodmap -e 'keycode 77 = NoSymbol Num_Lock' in Startup Applications, this worked for me best, no need for numlockx on as it should be on by default.


0

After a bit of searching, I seem to have found a solution - Install "Gnome tweak tools" and under Typing-->Miscellaneous Compatibility Options, set "Numeric keypad keys always enter digits".


0

To fix, I used ibus-setup in a terminal and followed instructions.


1

I was finally able to get the letter p back by updating Gnome to 3.20 using these instructions. For reference, here is the bug report I filed. It was determined to be a duplicate of this bug, where they recommended to just upgrade to 3.20.


0

Go to Settings -> Text Entry text entry settings Select the input source whose shortcut you do not want. For example, Pinyin(Fcitx) is selected here. Then, click on the button with a picture of a cross formed by a wrench and a screwdriver, and a keyboard. This opens up the window "Input Method Configuration". Go to the "Global config" tab: input ...


0

The closest I got to resolving the problem was this answer. It suggested to add to ~/.bashrc file this line export GTK_IM_MODULE=" " But still this will work only if synapse is launched from the terminal and not GUI. EDIT This is how I fixed the problem (I realize that I might done it not in the correct way due to lack of knowledge and experience, but ...


1

You need to install a2jmidid and use it to proxy the ALSA and MIDI interfaces, so they may be connected.


0

Use Ctrl+PageUP and Ctrl+PageDown (annoying, but it is what we have).


0

You need to disable the feature, not just it's shortcut. In Settings > Text field (translated from czech) you can change the shortcut or disable it altogether.


1

As the new settings manager does not have this option, you have to do it via command line. Disabling touchpad while typing is maintained by syndaemon. It's started by default, but you can kill it by typing killall syndaemon into terminal. If you wish to do it at startup, you can put this line into you .profile file, cron or to startup applications.


1

This isn't the answer I was looking for but ... I spent 2 days / many hours trying to solve this problem. I purchased a PCIe USB 3.0 hub to see if that would work - it din't. My conclusion is that this problem isn't worth solving and there are better ways to the same end. My solution/workaround is to rely on my text editor's snippets function. It means ...


0

Yes, I was able to get this to work, using Ubuntu 16.04 Server LTS. I put the detailed instructions that worked for me here: How can I install Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server on an HP ProLiant ML10 v2 Server


0

As far I can tell, the issue with 'c', 'd', 'e' (and the '3' as I had found) keys is a hardware problem. Either something stuck on the membrane, a connection issue to the board, or membrane damage. I haven't confirmed yet because the screw holding it together are 'triangle' screws - I can't find any bit to unfasten them. For the layout, I found that to be ...


0

I just found out that IBus was activating which substitutes Unicode characters. I guess pressing more than 4 characters locks up keyboard input. I found how to disable IBus completely. I went to the Ubuntu system settings...selected "Language Support". Under "Keyboard input method system" I changed "IBus" to "none", and my ctrl-shift-u lockup problem are ...


0

I can think of two solutions. The first requires you to change the startup configuration to load the xmod shortcuts before user login, and the other solution would be to switch to a terminal and change the brightness from there.


2

If you can reproduce the issue with another keyboard there may be another device that is causing the issue. Some good troubleshooting steps if you haven't already tried them: Try a live boot CD/DVD to see if the issue still occurs when booting into another OS (or a generic Ubuntu install) Unplug everything external except power, primary display, and the ...


1

I suspect that your best option is to use your point no. 4 and alter the keys used to take a screenshot. Perhaps not to Ctrl+PrtScr as you have suggested, as in a default installation this is already being used to copy screenshots to the clipboard. Navigate as follows: Dash --> System Settings --> Hardware --> Keyboard --> Shortcuts --> ...


0

I have a Logitech K480. First put the keyboard into pairing mode using the manual for instructions Open bluetooth manager and press on the "+" to add a device Bluetooth manager should find a device with name Logitech K380, click on Logitech K380 and then next. You should be prompted to type a PIN in on the bluetooth keyboard, enter the PIN followed by ...


0

I may not have a lot of experience with coding, software engineering or even with linux systems, but i do know one thing: a computer, no matter what system it uses, is mostly based on the human brain. Now i know it's possible for a brain (and a computer) to learn 2 languages side-by-side, but what you're asking of the pc is a bit different. You're not ...


0

You can reset the keybindings, that helped me because i had the same problem after some updates in 16.04 TLS and gnome 3.20.1 something use gsettings reset-recursively org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings gsettings reset-recursively org.gnome.metacity.keybindings gsettings reset-recursively org.gnome.mutter.keybindings gsettings reset-recursively ...


3

The symbol ^ is called caret, it's on the same key as numeric 6 on the keyboard. You need Shift+6 to type ^. On Regex notation (as you are using egrep), ^ is a token that matches start of a line. You command: stat -c "%u %g" /boot/grub/grub.cfg | egrep "^0 0" is necessarily checking if the file /boot/grub/grub.cfg is owned by root:root. %u and %g ...


4

There is a bug report related to this issue. Also you might want to join this team and follow their mailing list to stay updated.


1

I had similar issues with Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 more recently. After struggling for a while, I found that disabling USB auto suspend, solved (worked around) the problem. This feature is a part of usbcore which is compiled in the kernel in Ubuntu. From http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/175035, Edit the /etc/default/grub file and change the ...


1

It looks like the keys in question are already grabbed globally by some other application. The three segments of output you get from xev are only related to the xev window loosing and reaquireing the focus, while the key is grabbed otherwise (See my post on the old i3 FAQ). There are two likely causes, why xev might show an output like that and the ...


0

I had a similar issue on my CLEVO N150SD computer, also running Ubuntu 16.04 (x64) with standard kernel. After a while I realized that this weird behavior happened when I accidentally clicked on my touchpad. So I tried adding i8042.nomux=1 and i8042.noloop=1 on my boot parameters and now it is working. More info here: ...


1

I have the same laptop. You have two options: Change that behavior in BIOS, there is a option Press Fn + Esc (On Esc is a mark FN) I hope this will help.


0

If xev can't detect the keys then you will need to use or write a different driver that can enable the keys. That keyboard looks very much like a rebranded logitech keyboard so there drivers might be a start.


0

I ran into same issue myself, open virtual machine manager, go to edit > preferences > New VM. For graphics type change from systems default (spice) to VNC. After doing this you should be able to type in your VM.


0

You can change the layout from the panel. System / Settings / Keyboard and then choosing the Layout tab should work as well.


1

I found a software solution. clone the following program from github: git clone https://github.com/lentinj/tp-compact-keyboard.git compile to following program: cd tp-compact-keyboard/tp-compact-usb-keyboard make sudo ./tp-compact-usb-keyboard /dev/hidraw1 Maybe some errors are shown when you execute the program. This program sent 2 keystrokes to the ...


0

I solved this by installing the ibus-gtk3 package, logging out and then logging in again. I'm using Linux Mint 17.3, but this should work on any other distros. No need to install all of the ibus-* packages.


1

I had similar problems with the integrated keyboard and touchpad freezing randomly. (Dell Latitude 3450 with Synaptic clickpad) I posted the solution that worked for me here: http://askubuntu.com/a/768264/47084


0

For anyone using KDE, check under System Settings > Input Devices > Keyboard > Advanced. You'll need to enable "Configure keyboard options", open up "Alt/Win key behavior", then check "Ctrl is mapped to Win keys (and the usual Ctrl keys)". There is an identical setting for Alt mapping to the Win keys if you'd prefer the Control key be Alt.


0

Have you tried plug them on other USB ports in this notebook? Are them wired or wireless devices? If wireless it could be low battery issue..


0

I'm not able to reproduce the problem you have mentioned in comments, i.e. that enabling a Japanese keyboard layout wouldn't make a difference. I added Japanese, and the resulting keyboard layout looks like this: Then I opened gedit, switched to "Ja" via the input source indicator, and the expected characters according to the image above appeared when I ...


5

If you replace the command: xset dpms force standby that you currently use in the shortcut, by the command: /bin/bash -c "sleep 2 && xset dpms force standby" It will work exactly as you describe.



Top 50 recent answers are included