Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

If I don't mind the first problem, I may get rid of the second and the third: just turning off any Gnome-based layout features (set one language) and use just setxkbmap. So, the final solution would be: Turn off embedded solutions for layout switching and set only one input language (English). add setxkbmap -option ...


0

"I am using the Hindi layout in LibreOffice and then have to check something in Firefox, want to change music in gmusicbrowser, or something similar. Every time I leave LibreOffice, for whatever reason, the layout switches back to Danish" when you go back to Libreoffice is it not changing back to Hindi? Check right-click on the keyboard layouts tray ...


0

[Alt][Space] is the standard keyboard shortcut to activate a window since IBM OS/2 [Super][Space] is the standard keyboard shortcut to change keyboard input methods in Ubuntu To switch both around do a: gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings activate-window-menu "['<Super>space']" gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings ...


0

Recently looking at packages I found mathwriter input. This, apparently in Gnome3, allows the input of mathematical characters as if it were a special language. This allows to enter symbols by typing the name of the symbol, in the screen a menu appears with options and hitting space allow to choose a match. Relevant links: ...


2

USING KEYBOARD KEYS AS MOUSE BUTTONS You may want to map a keyboard key to a mouse button. If you want to click using a keyboard key (useful if you have a macbook or a bad trackpad button) then you can do the following. install some utilities: sudo apt-get install x11-utils xkbset x11-xserver-utils find the keycode for the key you want to map: type ...


0

How could I make alt-shift skip the rarely used language(s)? I would assume you can not. The system does not count keyboard lay-outs used to determine how often it is used. Then again it becomes possible if you change the question to .... How could I skip the rarely used language(s)? Then the answer would be: by using another key combination and ...


1

The same problem. ctrl+v, ctrl+c stops to work IN ANY application when when switch to Russian layout. I think it's sanctions :) I have no similar problems in Linux Mint for example.


0

Since asking the question, I've switched to Linux Mint 17 with the Cinnamon desktop. The Cinnamon desktop provides the same options for temporarily switching layouts that were available on Ubuntu 12.04, including the option to hold a particular key to temporarily switch keyboard layouts.


0

This problem has been reported as a bug in Ubuntu GNOME: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu-gnome/+bug/1385844 It looks like a cause of the problem has been found. Hopefully, developers will prepare a fix soon. I will update this answer when something changes. UPDATE 2014/11/12: In mentioned bug reported you can find a link to package prepared by one of ...


0

I think this has something to do with the way keys are mapped for the Persian layout. For example, the letter Z might not be mapped to the exact key (the one with the Z written on it). I don't know how the Persian layout is, but perhaps you could try finding which key corresponds to Z (if it's not the Z key) and try Ctrl+that key to see if it works as Redo. ...


0

Here is some more updated information: as of Nov. '14. I input Japanese and English regularly and got stuck on this after an upgrade -using ubuntu gnome 14.04 I type Japanese and English, so here is how I did it. In the Region/Language settings, you choose your input method, which implies the keyboard type. So for Japanese, there is a simple "Japanese" ...


0

With the help of the small script below, you can define special characters, character combinations or even lines, and insert them into documents (or other textual media) with a key combination. The solution is an edited version of this answer, but it skips the zenity window to choose the item to be inserted. How it works The complete setup exists of a ...


0

The closest I have come to this so far is to use (on lubuntu 14.04.1) <ctrl><shift>U then type the code say 00ac for ¬ which I found by using the character map. This is pretty quick way of doing it, if you know the code and remember each one. If I find another way I will update.


0

The exotic layouts get enabled with the following invocation of gsettings: gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.input-sources show-all-sources true


0

This monstrosity is achieved by a tool called Xmodmap. You will need to create a file, called .Xmodmap in your home directory. Search over the net for instructions on how to fill it. Many xmodmap manuals tell you to run it manually - you don't need to, the file will be applied on relogin automatically.


0

This rather weird problem solved once I restarted my computer.


1

Install ibus-m17n and add Hebrew (kbd (m17n)).


0

This is not an answer to my own question but a very useful alternative that consists in configuring gedit for the purpose of typing unicode/special characters. After trying some of the proposed solutions, I realized that changing the keyboard layout is an overkill. After all, I needed it only to code (mainly "string"s with unicode and math in LaTeX). So ...


0

There should be a little flag or initials on the right side of the LxPanel. Right click it and choose "Keyboard Layout Handler" Settings. Uncheck Keep system Layouts (under Advanced setxkbmap Options). Then add Korean and place it where you want it (using the up and down arrows.) Before you close the window, make sure you re-check Keep system Layouts. ...


1

According to Linux man page, acpid is the system-wide ACPI event catcher. acpi_listen is a simple shell-friendly tool which connects to acpid and listens for events. When an event occurs, acpi_listen will print it on stdout. As far as i understand, the keys ctrl, shift are not event creating keys. fn keys coupled with up or down (for toggling ...


1

acpi_listen is for observing cmds to the ACPI runtime, So if you where to say increase or decrease the brightness on your laptop you would see this. video/brightnessdown BRTDN 00000087 00000000 video/brightnessup BRTUP 00000086 00000000 I'm not really sure which tool you should use for listening to general key presses, but I know it's not acpi_listen.


0

try loadkeys es (Spanish, for example) loadkeys pt (Portuguese, for example) loadkeys br (Brazilian Portuguese, for example)


0

Test this: Open a terminal,Press Ctrl+Alt+T Run it: sudo -i apt-get update apt-get install xvkbd Xvkbd is a virtual (graphical) keyboard program for X Window System. When xvkbd is started, the image of a keyboard will be displayed on the screen. Clicking any key on the xvkbd window will send the character to the focused window as if the key had ...


2

( WIP - Do not vote on. ) Note: Ubuntu Mir will use the XKB format. Note: This is a non-exhaustive tutorial. It is most useful for an individual looking to create a new four level layout, and accessing it from the ubuntu settings. Understanding XKB Directory cd /usr/share/X11/xkb/ && ls types - How produced keys are changed by Active ...


0

For me, simply setting KEYMAP=Y in /etc/initramfs-tools/initramfs.conf worked -- I am now able to use my console's keymap for entering the LUKS passphrase. As root: echo "KEYMAP=Y" >> /etc/initramfs-tools/initramfs.conf update-initramfs -u Source: https://wiki.debian.org/Keyboard#Set_Keyboard_Layout_in_initramfs



Top 50 recent answers are included