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Before you start make sure you know what you are doing Type the following command dmesg | grep Corsair You should see something similar to the picture below The number you are looking for is the one in the location of the circle


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I can't take credit for this answer: it's someone's answer to your same question on another forum, but I'm posting the answer here because it helped me, and askubuntu was the first place I looked. $ setxkbmap -print -verbose 10 tells you things about your xkb setup. The output includes which keycodes are in use by your hardware. In fact there may be more ...


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I Noticed that I was only using Switch to next source using: and Switch to previous source using: was empty. I tried reassigning the same shortcut key again and it works perfectly now thanks to @GunnarHjalmarsson suggestion in the comments above.


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To fix, I used ibus-setup in a terminal and followed instructions.


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Go to System Settings -> Text Entry. To the right you find a couple of options which you may want to change in accordance with your preferences.


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What solved the problem for me: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:attente/java-non-latin-shortcuts sudo apt-get install unity-settings-daemon restart unity-settings-daemon Details: https://bugs.launchpad.net/unity/+bug/1226962


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As far I can tell, the issue with 'c', 'd', 'e' (and the '3' as I had found) keys is a hardware problem. Either something stuck on the membrane, a connection issue to the board, or membrane damage. I haven't confirmed yet because the screw holding it together are 'triangle' screws - I can't find any bit to unfasten them. For the layout, I found that to be ...


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I may not have a lot of experience with coding, software engineering or even with linux systems, but i do know one thing: a computer, no matter what system it uses, is mostly based on the human brain. Now i know it's possible for a brain (and a computer) to learn 2 languages side-by-side, but what you're asking of the pc is a bit different. You're not ...


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The symbol ^ is called caret, it's on the same key as numeric 6 on the keyboard. You need Shift+6 to type ^. On Regex notation (as you are using egrep), ^ is a token that matches start of a line. You command: stat -c "%u %g" /boot/grub/grub.cfg | egrep "^0 0" is necessarily checking if the file /boot/grub/grub.cfg is owned by root:root. %u and %g ...


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tl;dr You need to turn NumLock off. Explanation dvorak-querty works by "grabbing" (more like "stealing") keyboard combinations from other programs. Combinations that include certain modifiers (Control, Control+Shift, Alt and Alt+Shift) are stolen, "qwerty'd" and returned to the original program. The problem is that those, and only those, are the only ...


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You can change the system-wide keyboard configuration (including TTY), by running: sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration as described in this SO answer. To choose the thinkpadz60 layout shown in @brandizzi's answer, select the "IBM ThinkPad Z60m/Z60t/Z61m/Z61t" layout in the list. It should be above the "Generic PC" layout:


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You can change the layout from the panel. System / Settings / Keyboard and then choosing the Layout tab should work as well.


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The behavior you described is kind of expected. Within xrdp session, indeed, you have no much possibilities to change the keyboard layout. To define your keyboard layout within the xrdp session, you have to use the xrdp tools as well. You have to login into your ubuntu machine (console access no remote session) and perform the following steps Step 1 : ...


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I'm not able to reproduce the problem you have mentioned in comments, i.e. that enabling a Japanese keyboard layout wouldn't make a difference. I added Japanese, and the resulting keyboard layout looks like this: Then I opened gedit, switched to "Ja" via the input source indicator, and the expected characters according to the image above appeared when I ...


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check the settings permissions. I found that ~/.config/ibus/bus owned by root and user can't access it. There should be IBUS_DEMON_PID maintained by daemon. So change the owner and restart PC to populate the relationship.


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I found that ~/.config/ibus/bus owned by root and user can't access it. There should be IBUS_DEMON_PID maintained by daemon. So change the owner and restart PC to populate the relationship. That helped me


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I just installed Ubuntu 16.04 dual boot on my MBP13" yesterday. For Ubuntu 16.04, here's how i did it: Step 1: Launch terminal Step 2: Edit X Keyboard Extension nano /usr/share/X11/xkb/symbols/pc Step 3: Make the following changes. Ensure your file looks like this: key <LCTL> { [ Super_L ] }; key <LWIN> { [ Control_L ] ...


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The correct sollution to make permenant is : sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration


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Install "Japanese iBus MOZC" Keyboard: sudo apt-get install ibus-mozc mozc-server mozc-utils-gui Re-login (this is important!) and find mozc in System Settings -> Text Entry when you click the + button. If "your" Japanese is not listed, enter this command in shell im-config After that you should have these Japanese keyboard input sources in Text ...


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In a shell: sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration


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I read elsewhere that Ubuntu is no longer using xmodmap. It's using xkb instead. There's some info on that in this post: Permanent xmodmap in Ubuntu 13.04 However, I'm still using 12.04LTS, and I wanted to swap my Esc and grave keys. I did it with xmodmap and it worked. I created a small script that runs xmodmap and I have that script run when I login. ...



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