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0

Install "Chinese (traditional)" using Language Support. That will install some language support, including a couple of additional packages related to fcitx input methods. With those installed it should work.


0

You could also change your keyboard layout to English (US, with euro on 5) or English (US, alternative international), then you will be able to get a € symbol by pressing RightAlt+5.


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In Ubuntu 16.04 one can choose from two English keyboard layouts by clicking on En1 or En2 at the top right corner of the screen. @character can be obtained in the standard way shift + 2 by choosing En2 layout, which is the US English layout.


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Have you switched to Lubuntu? Maybe you could have some trouble if you have got it. Moreover maybe you have installed some apps that have deleted some libs linked to ibus. Remove all with sudo apt-get remove --purge ibus-* Re install from beginning.


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It apears my problem must have been due to a faulty / dead FN key. A hardware issue that is. My 'solutoin': To swap ctrl and FN via the relevant bios option. Then I was without a left ctrl key. So I swapped left ctrl with caps lock. the xmapmod for this is availble via google, but for the sake of posterity the process is: First Backup your current ...


0

To permantly disable CAPS-lock: xkbset nullify lock To re-enable it xkbset nullify -lock. To just toogle CAPS-lock: sudo apt-get install xdotool xdotool key Caps_Lock


1

You also need ibus-anthy or fcitx-anthy. Then you need to select either IBus or fcitx in Language Support. At next login you should be able to find the Anthy item in Text Entry.


0

The following solution has worked for me in 16.04 and believe it should be similar. First of all, why don't you just use the keypad with Num Lock off and use the 4 key as a right arrow? Anyway, if you want to remap the ins/0 key, you need to do this in the file /usr/share/X11/xkb/symbols/keypad. In there, edit the line key <KP0> { [ KP_Insert, ...


0

I struggled with this a bit during my last OS setup, and found a solution. On this setup I had to trudge through the Internet again to find. Let me leave it here for future reference. I am using Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and this is how I remapped my caps lock to escape: Open terminal Open the /etc/default/keyboard file with sudo (eg sudo nano /etc/default/...


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Some googling and a test led me to this: Right click the panel -> Add / Remove Panel Items -> Add -> Keyboard Layout Handler That adds an icon to the panel, and by right clicking it and selecting "Settings", a GUI tool for managing keyboard layouts shows up.


0

As previous tries did not solve the problem, here is a workaround: echo "setxkbmap -layout dk" >> ~/.xsessionrc Referance: https://wiki.debian.org/Keyboard


4

Well, found the trick after trying the GUI then watch which command it is launching. ~$ ps aux | grep gkbd user 4158 0.2 3.5 470116 27048 ? Sl 14:06 0:00 gkbd-keyboard-display -l us?intl user 4178 0.0 0.1 21296 928 pts/11 S+ 14:07 0:00 grep --color=auto gkbd ~$ pgrep -a gkbd 4158 gkbd-keyboard-display -l us intl ~$ ...


-1

IF you go into the keyboard settings you should be able to rearrange them.. As well as that have you put a lil time into finding a possible external application that lets you use them in Gnome 3 for those alt and super keys? Sorry if this didn't help you much.


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In the new Gnome3 Shell I needed to use the gnome-tweak-tool*. There I went to Typing -> Switching to another layout and selected my keystroke ("Alt+Shift"). Afterwards I needed to delete the keystroke in the Region and Language setting (Activities Menu -> Type Region -> Select Region and Language -> Input Sources -> Shortcut Settings). After restarting ...


0

Just had this happen. I was editing /usr/share/X11/xkb/symbols/pc (remapping alt to ctrl) but forgot a semicolon and could not use my keyboard to log in. I restarted using GRUB to select recovery mode and then root terminal mode. Keyboard worked in the simple root terminal and I was able to edit and fix .../pc. Phew!


0

Take a look at xbindkeys. Create at $HOME/.xbindkeysrc and make sure to launch xbindkeys on startup. "COMMAND IN HERE" F5 If you need to emulate another key press with the F5 key, look into xdotool. I unfortunately don't have much experience with that one.


0

Quick answer: instead of alt win:ctrl_alt_win, you should use ctrl:swap_lalt_lctl to swap alt and ctrl keys. Reference: type man keyboard, deep in, and you will find file /usr/share/doc/keyboard-configuration/xorg.lst contains options you need.


0

Editing the setting manually in dconf do the trick. Namely, execute dconf-editor, find org.gnome.desktop.input-sources.sources ant put the value [('xkb', 'us+intl')]. [Oddly enough, the box show-all-sources was unchecked, so I checked it but that changes nothing to the problem of the international variant not being displayed in the layout list.]


1

You want to define a compose key. I use Caps Lock for that. In preferences, go to Keyboard » Shortcut » Typing and change the Compose Key entry with any key you'd like. I suggest Caps Lock unless you use it often to write in capitals? Once that is setup you do: Compose Key + < + C → Č Compose Key + ' + o → ó Compose Key + ' + e → é In most ...



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