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0

I also had the similar experience in a 4-node cluser where all of the nodes are using 3.2.0-38-generic under ubuntu 12.04.5. The nfs version is: dpkg -la | grep nfs ii libnfsidmap2 0.25-1ubuntu2 NFS idmapping library ii nfs-common 1:1.2.5-3ubuntu3.2 NFS ...


0

He we noticed the same problem: Linux 3.2 kernel on Ubuntu 12.04 worked without any problems, Linux 3.13 on Unbuntu 14.02 had the same problem. I am not sure if this is really a bug in the kernel, to me it looks more like a problem with selective ACKs (SACK). You can workaround the problem by disabling TCP SACK with: sysctl net.ipv4.tcp_sack=0 This worked ...


3

You didn't install the kernel source code, only kernel headers (usually ending in .h), which declare kernel interfaces exposed to user space. You can get the kernel source code files (including those ending in .c) by installing linux-source or by downloading the code repository (either through Git or with a click on the “snaphot“ link behind the newest ...


0

Okay, I figured it out. Copy the patch file somewhere. I copied it to /usr/src/linux-3.13.0 Apply the patch. Tell patch to ignore the first segment of the internal pathing user@fubar:/usr/src/linux-3.13.0$ sudo patch -p 1 -u < elantech_trackpad_patch_for_laptops_v2.patch patching file Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt Hunk #1 succeeded at 1138 ...


0

You would need to get kernel sources, apply patch and compile your new kernel and get it installed (you may also want to create your own rpm with it)


0

Seems to have been a flakey cable. Why it would reliably print once, then choke after a power cycle, seems illogical. But a cable swap fixed this issue. Hope this helps to remind the next person to check over the hardware before going medieval on the error logs...


0

I also ended up having the wrong kernel on first boot of Ubuntu 14.04 after installing with an USB stick created with UNetbootin. The symptoms were that the boot partition could not be mounted, since there were no ext2 drivers available for the kernel. The strange thing was that the kernel in /boot seemed to be the correct one, at least based on it's name. ...


2

I suspect that your relatively new device is not covered in the relatively old 12.04 kernel. I suggest you get a temporary internet connection. Open a terminal and run: uname -r Is your kernel version annotated '-pae'? If so, please do: sudo apt-get install linux-backports-modules-cw-3.10-precise-generic-pae If not, do: sudo apt-get install ...


1

I had the same problem and did the following: Boot in recovery mode, kernel 3.13.0-40 sudo apt-get clean; sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install fglrx (I'm using AMD graphics, so you might not have to do this) and then I was able to boot again (now in .43) :) Hope this works for you


2

As to answer why , refer to the file /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/01autoremove-kernels As you can see, apt is told to never autoremove the kernels , as told by another (script) file, /etc/kernel/postinst.d/apt-auto-removal. And here it is: If your script-fu is good enough you could edit it to save only couple kernels, though I can't help you there as my script ...


0

As this page explains, you should remove old kernels manually, with a command like this for example: sudo apt-get autoremove linux-image-2.6.32-22-generic linux-image-2.6.32-21-generic Removing old kernels automatically is an advanced operation for experienced users. The same page explains this method too: dpkg -l 'linux-*' | sed '/^ii/!d;/'"$(uname -r | ...


0

As far as I can tell, dpkg -p is an alias for dpkg-query -p which is defined as: Display details about package-name, as found in /var/lib/dpkg/available. Users of APT-based frontends should use apt-cache show package-name instead and dpkg -s is an alias for dpkg-query -s which is defined as: Report status of specified package. So, as far ...


1

You would probably like to take a look at this article.


1

A general recipe to set permissions on kernel modules access is to add a file to /etc/udev/rules.d. For example, you can create a file /etc/udev/rules.d/99-kvm.rules with the following text: KERNEL=="kvm", GROUP="kvm-users"


0

the total kernel modules size is here of 200M. It is not htat much If you are looking for space you can remove the downloaded package if you don't need them anymore. sudo apt-get autoclean or if you want to more aggressive of the clean-up sudo apt-get clean you have compiled yourself the kernel, you can remove the builded file which can take some ...


0

You could try to enter this in the terminal: sudo apt-get -y --force-yes purge linux-shim-efi shim-amd64 shim-amd64-generic and it might work fine this way.


0

download and install the required driver. after that wired network works fine http://r8168dl.appspot.com/files/r8168-8.039.00.tar.bz2


2

Now that 14.10 has been released, there is an easier and better way to get 3.16 on Ubuntu 14.04: sudo apt-get install linux-image-generic-lts-utopic This package will always depend on the latest 3.16 image available. (This method may not have been ready at the time of this article.)


0

I'm having the exact same issue with an NVIDIA card (gtx770 and proprietary drivers) and the lowlatency kernel! I did not have the time to examine the problem here, but the result is the same so they may be related... I'm not able to access any other TTY, but using ssh I was able to conntect to the PC. I hope to find some time tomorrow.


0

Just to add to @eric-carvalho answer: If you don't want to wait to run Utopic kernel until Feb 2015, you can add the Canonical Team PPA. But this is the PPA description: This ppa is used for building pre-release and test kernels. It IS NOT RECOMMENDED that you subscribe to this PPA. If you're ok with that, add the PPA and install utopic kernel: sudo ...


1

I was having the same problem. Whenever I fire perf command I got : $ perf perf_2.6.38-1208 not found You may need to install linux-tools-2.6.38-1208 But actually perf was installed by installing linux-tools package but it was with different name perf_2.6.38-16. So, I am able to use perf with perf_2.6.38-16 command instead of perf. You can create alias ...


0

You could try type this in the tty: sudo apt-get -y --force-yes install linux-amd64-efi shime-amd64 shim-amd64-generic and it might work fine this way.


0

Same here, Athlon 5150 with radeon R3 (HD8400). Black screen, system freeze during boot, started after upgrade of Ubuntu (this upgrade is included into installation of Ubuntu(!!!) ) Here is the bug report: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1402386 The worse is, the kernel 3.16.0-28 is also plagued by this bug.


0

Just reinstall the linux-image package and everything will be fine. sudo apt-get install --reinstall linux-image I recommend you although to use some full virtual machine like VirtualBox to test what you want to do before doing that on actual system.


0

I found that there is a kernel issue because I did upload tests with different kernel versions from kernel.ubuntu.com on a fresh ubuntu 14.04 installation. First I tested v3.14.26 but uploads do not work. After that, I tested v3.10.62 and everything is ok.


0

1) I chose and boot 3.13.0-39. 2) Then I turned fglrx proprietary 3) And reboot in 3.13.0-43, thats work P.S. sorry for my googletranslation P.P.S System: Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS i686 Kernel: 3.13.0-43-generic DE: Unity Session: ubuntu Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i3-2100 CPU @ 3.10GHz Video: 01:00.0 VGA compatible controller: Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. ...


1

Well, after waiting for more than 6 months, the updates I got seem to have solved the problem. Hibernating works now. The only drawback is that after suspending to ram, the sound does not work, though it can be re-enabled by hibernating followed immediately by a wake up.


0

FWIW - Hibernate seems to work "out of the box" for me on Linux Mint 17.1 (Cinnamon, 64-bit, if it matters) I was pleasantly surprised. But ... This guy seems to recommend disabling it https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/mint-cinnamon-first#TOC-Disable-hibernation-suspend-to-disk-


0

You'll need to install the headers for your version of the kernel. In this case, you're on Utopic (based on your kernel version in the error), so you'll need the linux-headers-3.16.0-25-generic package. This will install the headers: sudo apt-get install linux-headers-3.16.0-25-generic


0

Please check whether addon is enabled in browser and use the below command, sudo apt-get install ubuntu-restricted-extras Hope this helps.


0

Some installer may prompt for separate boot partition, and if that is small size then it can become full and fail to build new kernel/initramfs. Check this with df?


0

FIX: I switched to X, by using Ctrl+Alt+F7. Then, I uninstalled xorg and reinstalled it.


0

If the system decides to hold back a kernel upgrade, it has its reasons... (Like you have Oracle's VirtualBox with drivers compiled for your kernel or similar low-level software installed) That being said, if you do want to upgrade your kernel: Do a full system backup (I use CloneZilla) just install the latest version by: sudo apt-get install ...


1

You have to compile the kernel. The /boot/config-3.13.0-37-generic is simply the kernel config file at the time of compilation; it is there so that you know what has been compiled into your kernel and as a starting point for your own compilations. It's not so difficult to do it --- the worst part of kernel compiling is the configuration; there are ...


0

Currently on Ubuntu 14.04, my kernel version is 3.16.0-25. Try installing this version if you want the latest one. Have you tried simply the following commands? The first one checks the updates and the second one installs them ? sudo apt update sudo apt upgrade What is the output?


0

My guess is that you did not rebooted your system. Currently you are running 3.13.0-32. The latest kernel version is 3.13.0-40. After reboot the system will boot in the latest. So all intermediate versions will never be used and can be removed. I suggest to use autoremove (sudo apt-get autoremove), then reboot the system and watch if the it has booted to ...


1

DJCrashdummy was correct, the kernel is basically the whole operating system. In fact "Linux" is a kernel! A kernel is a mechanism to abstract the compute hardware to the software. So, regardless of what underlying hardware is in the machine, the same system calls (calls programs make the kernel) can be used to access the hardware regardless of the ...


1

Ubuntu is working with a Linux Kernel. to explain it very simple: the Kernel is the piece of software that gets your hardware working with the Operating System. so... if you are successfully booting and using a Operating System, you already use a Kernel. in your case you probably need a extra driver... and some drivers just work with a specific ...


0

Are you able to access the filesystem from the LiveCD? You might need to mount the filesystem first, the LiveCD may not automatically mount it. From a command line you can use demsg to find out the device name of the hard drive, e.g. /dev/sda1 Then simply make a mount point and mount it: sudo mkdir /mnt/system sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/system From ...


0

Install a newer kernel version and reboot. For me, the problem disappeared when using kernel 3.13.0-29-generic.


0

maybe your CD have defects you should try to install it via usb. if you have a windows machine you can use this software: http://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/ its easy and you will manage to create a USB to boot it.


0

I took these hints from this recipe https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Kernel/CrashdumpRecipe Increase the allocation by changing crashkernel= on the grub command line or in /boot/grub/grub.cfg (for grub2) or /boot/grub/menu.lst (for old grub). To avoid losing the settings when running update-grub the change can be made in /etc/grub.d/10_linux.


1

I may have skimmed through your question but, rule of thumb, Linux and Windows should stick to their own hard drives. They'll always try to take priority over each other, even on separate partitions. *Edit: I would try to not use any Windows repair tool while both OS's are partitioned on the drive. Gparted shouldn't mess anything up but, tools like it can ...


0

I have solve the issue last night. What I have done was to use the following commands first to get grub menu back from grub rescue: grub rescue> set boot=(hd0,msdos6) grub rescue> set prefix=(hd0,msdos6)/boot/grub grub rescue> insmod normal grub rescue> normal After this I got to grub usual boot selection menu. Then instead of booting to ...


0

Install Linux Generic Headers: sudo apt-get install linux-headers-generic Install the Drivers: sudo apt-get install fglrx fglrx-amdcccle OR sudo apt-get install fglrx-updates fglrx-amdcccle-updates Generate a fresh xorg.conf BEFORE REBOOTING! sudo aticonfig --initial OR sudo amdconfig --initial OR (for AMD dual GFX) sudo aticonfig ...


1

Nope. Only users have to go through a shell to communicate with the Kernel. Applications use APIs. For example, if I want to delete a file, I have to use one shell or the other, and then an application to delete the file: With a Command-Line Interface (CLI) shell, such as bash, I can use the rm command to delete the file. With a GUI shell (like Unity, or ...


0

Another way is to search for the folders which are eating up your inode count. See here: Broken package after update: linux-headers, error brokencount >0 This is the most important part: In a terminal, cd to root to start: # cd / Then search for the folders eating up most inodes: # for i in `ls -1A`; do echo "`find $i | sort -u | wc -l` $i"; done | ...


0

Yeah, I used to do this such of mess moving partitions too. forget the grub rescue, download the grub rescue cd: http://sourceforge.net/projects/boot-repair-cd/ run it in a USB stick or a cd and it will restore the boot to ubuntu automatically. or you can use any debian-based live cd and follow these steps: boot the live cd, chose try ubuntu/debian/etc., ...


4

"Canonical Kernel Team". Found it on the debian mailing list and it also explains why 3.16 is the only kernel at the moment that has it. In addition, I would like to announce a change in the kernel numbering scheme that we will be using: we are adding the string '-ckt' ('Canonical Kernel Team') to the kernel version. So, for example, kernel ...


1

$ gcc -Wall -pedantic -o hw hw-no-return.c hw-no-return.c:1:1: warning: C++ style comments are not allowed in ISO C90 [enabled by default] // 'Hello World!' program ^ hw-no-return.c:1:1: warning: (this will be reported only once per input file) [enabled by default] hw-no-return.c:5:1: warning: return type defaults to ‘int’ [-Wreturn-type] main() ^ ...



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