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To find the variable which sets the JDK home for Netbeans you need to open the config file which sets it (replace <versionNumber> with the version number of your NetBeans, such as 8.0.2): gedit netbeans-<versionNumber>/etc/netbeans.conf And then locate variable called netbeans_jdkhome and set it to the current location of your JDK folder. For ...


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I've solved this problem with these commands sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/java sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install oracle-java8-installer sudo apt-get install oracle-java8-set-default and export JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/default-java


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That may be an OpenJDK issue. Sometimes the Oracle JDK is required in order to get something to work. Generally the JDKs are downwards compatible, you could as well use version 8. Here is a tutorial how to install it: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/technotes/guides/install/linux_jdk.html If you already installed (read: put it somewhere on your ...


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I add the follow line at the end of eclipse.ini file: -Dorg.eclipse.swt.browser.DefaultType=mozilla It worked for me, I hope you too.


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Assuming that you have only that installation of java and that you have followed the tutotial exactly as described in the link: In a terminal run: sudo update-alternatives --remove-all java sudo update-alternatives --remove-all javac sudo update-alternatives --remove-all javaws sudo rm -rf /usr/lib/jvm/jdk1.8.0


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I see the same behavior as you do with OpenJDK-7. I solved it by installing version 8 of OpenJDK (sudo apt-get install openjdk-8-jre), and then selecting it using update-alternatives --config java In my case, the output of update-alternatives --config java now looks like the following: There are 2 choices for the alternative java (providing ...


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while I know this is a linux question, I am also a programmer and I humbly suggest that you download an IDE and work with it on java. Netbeans is pretty good and is my favorite tool for developing java ( on both windows and linux..). Once you download the bundle, the installer will setup a jvm for you to work with from the IDE, thus saving you from a world ...


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You should see Example.java if you type the ls (List) command in terminal ? one@one:~$ ls -l Your terminal launches by default in your home folder. If your file is in /home/shawn/usr/java, you have to change within terminal to this directory with the cd (ChangeDirectory) command: one@one:~$ cd /home/shawn/usr/java one@one:~/shawn/usr/java$ Now type ls ...


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The answers above are correct but I have one thing to add. Actually the environment variables for Shell Session and Desktop GUI Session are different (check this). If the error happens when you launch IntelliJ with Desktop Entry(the Launcher), you might don't have JAVA_HOME in your GUI Environment. So the easiest solution is to add JAVA_HOME in the Exec ...


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I don't think you are supposed to open Android Studio as root anyways, only sudo programs if you really need to, even if you think they are safe. Anyways, I think this is due to your environment variables not being set when you run the script as root. You may have to set your JAVA_HOME variable in the script (before launching Android Studio) Run this ...



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