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10

There are currently two java versions (vendors, if you will) available: Oracle's (Previously Sun) JDK, the closed source java, with commertial support from oracle 'n stuff. OpenJDK, the open source java. Oracle released part of their source and renamed it. In the days of java6, there used to be a big difference between the two of them, OpenJDK running ...


7

This recent change referenced in the 'apt' package ChangeLog appears to be the likely culprit: apt (0.9.15.4ubuntu4) trusty; urgency=low Cherry pick fixes from the apt 1.0 branch: [ Michael Vogt ] * add sun-java{5,6}-jdk to breaks/replaces as that provided a "apt" binary as well The oracle-java8-installer package "Provides" the "sun-java6-jdk" ...


6

Andy S has the underlying problem here and I'd expect a fix out soon. Please use the bug report link he provided and indicate that it also affects you so that it gains higher priority. If you absolutely can't wait, here's a temporary workaround to ignore the dependency issues and force the install: Download the .deb package from apt sudo apt-get download ...


2

1st thing you need to supply is an argument. According to man update-alternatives those can be ... Synopsis alternatives [options] --install link name path priority [--slave link name path]... [--initscript service] alternatives [options] --remove name path alternatives [options] --set name path alternatives [options] --auto name ...


2

First, reinstall openjdk. Then install Java 8. Then run update-java-alternatives to select Java8. Finally, (optionally) try to remove openjdk. The cost of keeping the previous version (in disk space) is pretty low (because modern disks just keep getting bigger). Once you have Java 8 installed, you need to set it as your JVM - sudo update-java-alternatives ...


1

If you need the library file, you don't have to install the development package. libpcap-dev is the package containing the files needed to develop and compile own programs using the functionalities offered by libpcap. The dynamic library, the .so file, is located in a package which doesn't have -dev in its name. On my system, Ubuntu 13.10, it is located in ...


1

I installed Spark 2.6.3 on my Ubuntu 13.10 64 bit system. I installed Oracle Java 1.7 using the instructions for Java installation (Step 2) found here. To get Spark to run, because it comes with a 32 bit JRE, I had to modify the ./Spark script to get it to find the Oracle JRE, and also so it would accept version 1.7. Changes to line 4 (was commented out, ...


1

There' a bug that keeps the menu from working see https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/unity-gtk-module/+bug/1208019 the work around is to change one line in the eclipse.desktop file Exec=eclipse to Exec=env UBUNTU_MENUPROXY= eclipse Also I had to make the desktop executable before I did the desktop-file-install in order to make it work.


1

Please follow below steps to install oracle java: Download the latest Java SE SDK version. http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/index.html Untar the Archive: tar -xzvf /root/jdk-7u17-linux-x64.tar.gz mv jdk1.7.0_17 /opt cd /opt/jdk1.7.0_17 This step registers the downloaded version of Java as an alternative, and switches it to be used ...


1

This worked for me # update-alternatives --config javaws There are 2 choices for the alternative javaws (providing /usr/bin/javaws). Selection Path Priority Status ------------------------------------------------------------ 0 /usr/lib/jvm/java-6-openjdk-amd64/jre/bin/javaws 1061 auto mode 1 /usr/lib/jvm/java-6-openjdk-amd64/jre/bin/javaws 1061 manual ...


1

You shouldn't be launching Minecraft by running launcher.jar. This file is not built to be executed alone and can't be. You have to use Minecraft.jar instead. This is the program that takes care of the login and actually calls the launcher. The technical reason is the following: Executable Java Archives (.jar files) have to contain a line in their ...


1

It's probably because you don't have access to /opt/java folder as normal user. Try below commands and then try to access: sudo chmod -R 755 /opt/[java folder name] sudo chown -R [username] /opt/[java folder name] In case you are willing to try another method. I use it and it works all the time. Download the latest Java SE SDK version. ...


1

You can select java version using update-alternatives command. Run below command in terminal. sudo update-alternatives --config java And type selection number that you want to use. Like this: Caution: The above description is the procedures for changing a default version. It is not an answer of this question, but should help you set the JAVA home


1

The name of the control panel is different depending on whether you are using the Oracle JDK or OpenJDK. Search for "control panel" in the dash. If you're using the Oracle JDK, you'll see the Oracle Java 7 Plugin Control Panel. If you're using OpenJDK, you'll see the Iced Tea Web Control Panel.


1

Try to install libxerces2-java: sudo apt-get install libxerces2-java To actually find the right package, try using the powerful http://packages.ubuntu.com using the query on package content: http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?searchon=contents&keywords=xerces+jar&mode=filename&suite=saucy&arch=any


1

The Chromium maintainer announced that Chromium is going to experience 'growing pains'. Several things will be breaking. Regarding flash, you will need to install the pepper flash plugin instead sudo apt-get install pepperflashplugin-nonfree sudo update-pepperflashplugin-nonfree --install



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