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You need the complete path for your iso file: mount -o loop <path_to_iso>/Matlab_801_R2013a_MacUnix.iso /mnt/disk And ISO files usually have an extension. Check that and note the correct spelling of the file..


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You can use WinUSB to create a bootable usb for windows. Open a terminal and run the following commands. Download the deb file. For 32-bit systems run wget https://launchpad.net/~colingille/+archive/freshlight/+files/winusb_1.0.11+saucy1_i386.deb For 64-bit systems run wget ...


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You can't just copy the ISO to the disc, but if you use an ISO burner like Startup Disc Creator, which I believe works with USB drives, it should be bootable.


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codecs are not involved with ISO burning. Permissions would already interfere at the beginning of the burn run. So it's most probably your drive which fails to burn the given media in a recognizable way. You could try a different media type and/or brand or a different burner drive. Have a nice day :) Thomas


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ISO 9660 Wikipedia's page The ISO 13490 standard is an extension to the ISO 9660 format that adds support for multiple sessions on a disc. Since ISO 9660 is by design a read-only, pre-mastered file system, all the data has to be written in one go or "session" to the medium. Once written, there is no provision for altering the stored content. ISO 13490 was ...


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There was infact no such issue. I somehow missed to check the file-permissions of the .iso file. Set it to exe, and then was able to boot RHEL via kvm.


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A couple of things to check: Is there enough space on the USB drive? Is the USB drive mounted? You may want to try reformatting the drive before you attempt running unetbootin beware that this will wipe the USB Drive!: sudo fdisk /dev/sdx (replace x with whatever the usb drive # is) Then type d then the ENTER Key This will delete the current ...


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You can use the dd utility. First unmount your usb-drive and then get the device name with: lsblk Then create the bootable usb with: sudo dd bs=4M if=/path/to/your.iso of=/dev/xxx && sync Change /dev/xxx to your usb-drive device name.


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If you want to install packages on an offline system, apt ist prepared for this. This link is for xubuntu, but it will also work on your ubuntu system. All you need is another system with apt and internet access.


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You could use xorriso. I don't remember why but I think this is not possible with mkisofs. Try: xorriso -as mkisofs \ -isohybrid-mbr /usr/lib/syslinux/mbr/isohdpfx.bin \ -c isolinux/boot.cat \ -b isolinux/isolinux.bin \ -no-emul-boot \ -boot-load-size 4 \ -boot-info-table \ -eltorito-alt-boot \ -e boot/grub/efi.img \ -no-emul-boot \ ...


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mdf2iso doesn't seem to support all MDF files, notably those created by Alcohol 120% which contain lots of extra anti-anti-piracy metadata. Use iat instead, it works in more cases (although still not all), and succeeds mdf2iso.


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Within my ~/Downloads folder there is a hidden folder ".Trash-1000", in which things were going. I have no idea how that is supposed to be managed, but I got my disk space back.


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If you are having problem mounting files on dvd , you can use the live-usb to do that. Just download win32 disk imager and install and then select the usb name(before that format the usb as fat32 or any other availible then ntfs) and burn the .iso or image file to the usb. It is simple and effective.


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You can use "ISO Master" to Read, write and modify ISO images. Link below https://apps.ubuntu.com/cat/applications/precise/isomaster/


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I create my backups and live iso files with Systemback utility, you can install it from its PPA and it works the same as remastersys (no longer maintained), i think. In ubuntu 14.04 i needed an extra package called unionfs-fuse too. It can also create live usb images. You can add your user files in iso which can then be installed on other machines, but other ...



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