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You can use Clonezilla. It's a great tool if you want all systems have a same copy of OS and softwares. As your requirement look like you want all alike systems. You can clone any hard disk partition or full hard disk using this utility. You will have a great choice of USB install, network install, samba server, etc. to install your cloned image to other ...


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You have many tools that are available for Ubuntu 12.04(some of them are not used anymore for newer versions. but still works for ubuntu 12.04). relinux remastersys Ubuntu Builder System Imager And much more. I personally advise you to use Relinux. Download this version from launchpad and not the last version to use the following tutorial on it Here ...


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To merge the three parts back into the original file, just run: cat part1 part2 part3 > original Now if you are reasonably sure that the resulting file is an ISO file 1 (e.g. the splitted parts have a .iso extension), the most straightforward way to create a bootable USB drive out of it is to use dd; carefully check thrice to which block device your ...


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If you have an ISO file obtained from a CD or DVD, you do not need any extra software to run it on Linux. You can mount it as any other device with this command: mount -o loop -t iso9660 fileName.iso /your/destination/folder You then will be able to run the files on the CD as it was in a real CD unit. Note than in some cases that the CD has copy ...


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There are no real alternatives to Daemon Tools, but these two are probably the best you'll get: Mountiso - command-line tool: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/MountIso Acetonel - if you're looking for a GUI: https://apps.ubuntu.com/cat/applications/precise/acetoneiso/


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When burning an iso file in Ubuntu, you should be able to put the blank disc in, and it will bring up the prompt to select what you want to do. Select cancel and find the iso file. Right click the iso file, and select 'Write to disc'. This will bring up a prompt that lets you write the file to the disc. Select the disc drive you want to burn to, and select ...


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Yes, there is a difference. I had the same issue when booting the installer from a USB - is this what you are doing? If you have used some utility to create it, it may not have worked correctly with the newest image. Just do (please, make sure you put YOUR actual paths ;-) ) the following from some linux installation (Alt+F2 will work even from that same ...


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The official page containing MD5 hashes for Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Edubuntu Xubuntu and Lubuntu is: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UbuntuHashes Choose the relevant distribution and click on the MD5SUMS file. Now check your download ISO: md5sum ubuntu-*.iso Compare the hash (the alphanumeric string on left) that your machine calculated with the ...


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Mirror homepage image dowload for you http://www.ubuntu.com/download/server


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Check here where there are old releases : http://old-releases.ubuntu.com/releases/14.04.0/


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"USB Image Tool" is a freeware for Windows which can create images of your BOOTABLE USB flash drives and also allows you to restore them later. This free tool can be used to create backup images of almost all types of BOOTABLE USB devices such as flash drives, card readers, digicams, cell phones and mobile music players. Its a portable tool so you don't ...


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This sounds like the downloaded file is corrupted. On a Mac OS, you can compute the MD5 sum of the file from a terminal using md5sum /path/to/lubuntu-15.04-desktop-i386.iso I think you can even view it in the file's properties alternatively. Then compare that checksum to the one given on the download page. If they do match, ignore this answer, the problem ...


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By default this is how it's made and look like: FAT = Maximum file size is 2 GB. FAT32 = Maximum file size is 4 GB. NTFS = File size limited only by size of volume. As you can see this is the support of the file/image size that supported by each system/partition table. So, if you're planning on using files larger than 4GB it is recommended to use NTFS ...


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Solved by OP in Question Edit: Never mind, seems like an iDRAC key mapping issue. I changed iDRAC to use Java for console and it seems to work now. Not an Ubuntu problem.



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