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There is a set of utilities, and an information string which provide what you are looking for. They need to be installed... Open a terminal window ctrl+alt+t Install the utilities sudo apt-get install mesa-utils The command glxinfo | more will contain information about how the graphics section looks up. Try glxinfo | grep string - you are not looking ...


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Yes. The AMD64 architecture was developed by AMD as an extension to the Intel x86 architecture. It is implemented by AMD and Intel in consumer-grade 64-bit CPUs. AMD64 is alternately called x86-64 (which makes its Intel heritage more apparent).


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The lshw command can show you the CPU model, and you can look it up on Wikipedia: sudo lshw -C CPU | grep product product: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-3330 CPU @ 3.00GHz In general, for a Core iX processor, if the model number is 2XXX, it is a Sandy Bridge model, Ivy Bridge if 3XXX and Haswell if 4XXX. Of course, the lshw command uses internationalization, so ...


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For Intel processors, the ARK is a good place to look. The 520M's page is here and tells you everything you could possibly want to know about the processor. You can even search for Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge mobile processors and see that the 520M predates both Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge. Also, "cat /proc/cpuinfo" is more portable than lshw.


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According to the Intel docs: Affinity Types Type is the only required argument. type = none (default) Does not bind OpenMP threads to particular thread contexts; however, if the operating system supports affinity, the compiler still uses the OpenMP thread affinity interface to determine machine topology. Specify KMP_AFFINITY=verbose,none to ...


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For pre-built systems Ubuntu has a Certification Program. For custom-built systems, there really isn't a foolproof way to check other than installing it and seeing if it works. That being said, Ubuntu works out of the box with no extra work required on probably 80% of systems I've installed it on. For best performance in applications requiring 3D hardware ...


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There are two things that you should check, the first as mentioned by @kkpatel is that the VM Tools will need to be installed in your virtual Windows machine. This can be done in a couple of manners, but the easiest is this: While the VM is running, and not in full-screen mode, choose 'VM' from the VMWare Menu, and in the menu the second to bottom option ...



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